Now showing items 21-40 of 6150

    • WAF0042 - Inquiry: Women in the Armed Forces: From Recruitment to Civilian Life

      Spenser, Karin; Childs, Carrie; Adhikari, Joanna; University of Derby (UK Parliament, 2021-03-03)
      It is acknowledged that once military service is complete, personnel embark on a long metaphorical journey back to civilian life. Women military service leavers (WMSLs) are the fastest growing segment of the armed forces, and for them this transition can be even more traumatic than for their male counterparts. Whilst, it is recognised that to make this change seamless, they must have timely access to high quality women-centric services, it is suggested that such support is both limited and male-focused. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with eight WMSLs to gain a better understanding of the transition from military to civilian life. Thematic analysis was adopted to identify themes and subthemes. Two main themes were identified from the narratives – an environment of stress and long-term impact of service. Both themes are composed of several subthemes, which capture aspects of each main theme. Findings suggest the being in the military is stressful for all, but there is a perceived lack of support for WMSLs as they move into to civilian life. Their struggle with issues such as housing, employment and mental health was noted. Therefore, this research concludes that women need specific support during and after their military career.
    • The importance of Forest School and the pathways to nature connection

      Cudworth, Dave; Lumber, Ryan; DeMontfort University; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-02-18)
      Over the past 25 years Forest School in the UK has been growing in popularity as part of a wider resurgence of interest in outdoor learning. A key driver behind this recurrence of interest has been a growing concern over the lack of child exposure to outdoor experiences and with the natural world and their ensuing nature-deficit disorder. This article considers Forest School as linked with the concept of nature connection that is the sensation of belonging to a wider natural community. This sense of belonging developed by being in nature can also be a key factor in promoting attachment and sense of place which in turn is associated with the promotion of health, wellbeing and pro-environmental behaviours. As such the origins towards achieving nature connection are a formal part of the Forest School Association’s (FSA 2016). Forest School principals, with growing research linking Forest School and nature connection as concomitant. Recent work has suggested that contact, emotion, meaning, compassion, and beauty are key pathways for the formation of nature connection and there is a strong need to better understand children’s nature connection in this context. Further, from the premise that what goes on in spaces and places is fundamentally linked to both social and spatial processes, this article also attempts to understand the spatialities of Forest School in order to frame the development of nature connection within a socio-spatial analytic.
    • A Critical Discussion of the Clinical Management of Dietary Supplementation in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

      Chatzinikolaou, Marios Dimitrios; Apeiranthitou., Vasiliki; University of Derby; University College London (ECronicon Open Access, 2021-01-30)
      Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are both classified as neurodevelopmental disorders, affecting primarily young children and adolescents, stemming from biological/genetic and environmental origins that negatively influence neurobiological structures and leading to gastrointestinal discomforts. More precisely, toxins produced by pathogenic microorganisms’ overgrowth, unnecessary employment of antibiotics, abnormalities in the activity of carbohydrate digestive enzymes and gut’s mucosal lining disruptions result in alterations in children’s neurological functioning. Central nervous system alterations adversely affect brain maturation, social interactions, and cognitive abilities. In this respect, dietary supplementations such as omega-3 and omega-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and/or vitamins can be effectuated, potentially increasing the effectiveness of pharmacological medications. However, research findings divulge an unspecified consensus concerning optimal supplementation duration, exact dosages, consistent utilization of outcome measures, adherence to supplements, and their longterm behavioral and health effects. In addition, dietary supplements do not always enable for corrections of children’s micronutrient deficiencies, contributing to excessive intake. Thus, it can be speculated that they cannot be provided solitarily since they depict developmental insensitivities in addressing all nutritional needs of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder individuals. Accordingly, each individual’s developmental needs and entire dietary patterns should be carefully considered for the elimination of comorbid health conditions. In conjunction with the development and validation of universally accepted dietary plan, this shall allow for the construction of a holistic and multidisciplinary approach to dietary treatment schemes that can fully benefit these populations and are especially adapted to their needs. Future research should further explore gluten/casein-free and other restrictive diets, along with the clarification of effective randomized controlled trials.
    • Another look at contagion across United States and European financial markets: Evidence from the credit default swaps markets

      Tsionas, Mike G.; Apergis, Nicholas; Lancaster University; University of Derby (Wiley, 2021-01-18)
      The paper looks at the results of Apergis, Christou and Kynigakis (2019) and proposes a novel model that allows time variation in volatility, skewness and kurtosis, based on multivariate stable distributions. The analysis also looks at bank sector CDS, insurance sector CDS, sovereign bonds, equity and volatility indices. The findings corroborate their results and indicate significant evidence of contagion, especially through the channels of co‐skewness and co‐kurtosis. In addition, it establishes a higher order channel of causality between co‐skewness and co‐kurtosis.
    • Impact of economic policy uncertainty on CO2 emissions: evidence from top ten carbon emitter countries

      Anser, Muhammad Khalid; Apergis, Nicholas; Syed, Qasim Raza; University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an, China; University of Derby; National Tariff Commission, Ministry of Commerce, Islamabad, Pakistan (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-02-08)
      Over the last few decades, economic policy uncertainty (EPU) has surged across the globe. Furthermore, EPU affects economic activities, which may also generate strong CO2 emissions. The goal of this study is to explore the impact of EPU (measured by the world uncertainty index) on CO2 emissions in the case of the top ten carbon emitter countries, spanning the period 1990 to 2015. The findings from the PMG-ARDL modelling approach document that the world uncertainty index (WUI) affects CO2 emissions in both the short and the long run. In the short run, a 1% increase in WUI mitigates CO2 emissions by 0.11%, while a 1% rise in WUI escalates CO2 emissions by 0.12% in the long run. The findings could have some substantial practical effects on economic policies through which policy makers try to shrink any uncertainty by organizing and participating in international summits and treaties. In addition, international organizations could also launch certain programs to shrink uncertainties associated with economic policy. Finally, these countries should introduce innovation, renewable energy, and enforce alternative technologies that are environment friendly. Overall, governments must provide strong tax exemptions on the use of clean energy, while R&D budgets should also expand.
    • The causal linkage between inflation and inflation uncertainty under structural breaks: Evidence from Turkey

      Apergis, Nicholas; Bulut, Umit; Ucler, Gulbahar; Ozsahin, Serife; University of Derby; Kirsehir Ahi Evran University, Kirsehir, Turkey; Necmettin Erbakan University, Konya, Turkey (Wiley, 2021-03-03)
      The goal of this paper is to examine the relationship between inflation and inflation uncertainty for Turkey through monthly data spanning the period 2004:01–2019:12. To this end, the paper first builds the inflation uncertainty series using inflation data. Second, it examines the cointegration relationship between inflation and inflation uncertainty. Finally, it searches for causal relationships between inflation and inflation uncertainty. The paper employs econometric methods which explicitly consider structural breaks. After examining the inflation–inflation uncertainty nexus for the whole sample, the analysis also investigates this relationship in two subperiods, i.e., 2004:5–2010:10 and 2010:11:2019:12 considering the change in the monetary policy framework of the Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey (CBRT). The findings provide evidence that there exists unidirectional causality running from inflation to inflation uncertainty for both the whole sample and the second subperiod, while there is no causality between inflation and inflation uncertainty for the first subperiod. Overall, the results show that during the second subperiod (i) when the CBRT tried to achieve not only price stability, but also financial stability and (ii) when the inflation rate is more volatile and higher, the increase in the inflation rate results in an increase in inflation uncertainty.
    • Responses of carbon emissions to corruption across Chinese provinces

      Ren, Yi-Shuai; Ma, Chao-Qun; Apergis, Nicholas; Sharp, Basil; Hunan University, China; University of Auckland, New Zealand; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2021-03-19)
      In response to the recent growth of multitudes of theoretical literature analysing the corruption impact on the economy and environment, this paper subjects the corruption–carbon emission relationship in China to a detailed empirical examination through the autoregressive distributed lag modelling approach and panel quantile regressions. Based on panel data from Chinese provinces, spanning the period 1998–2016, this study explores the impact of long- and short-term corruption on per capita carbon emissions by considering the heterogeneous distribution of those emissions. The results document that corruption increases per capita carbon emissions in Chinese provinces in the short run, reducing per capita carbon emissions in the long run. Moreover, an increase in corruption leads to an increase in carbon emissions per capita in all quantiles, indicating that these emissions increase with corruption severity. The coefficients in low quantiles are slightly larger than those in high quantiles, indicating that corruption leads to more carbon emissions in provinces with lower per capita carbon emissions.
    • The asymmetric relationship of oil prices and production on drilling rig trajectory

      Apergis, Nicholas; Ewing, Bradley T.; Payne, James E.; University of Derby; Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA; The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA (Elsevier BV, 2021-01-22)
      With active drilling rigs essential for replenishing oil resources depleted through production, this study examines the potential asymmetries between drilling rig trajectory (vertical, directional, and horizontal), oil prices and oil production in the U.S. within a nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag framework. Based on weekly data, the results reveal long-run symmetry with respect to oil prices irrespective of drilling rig trajectory. However, there is long-run asymmetry for oil production consistent with the capital-intensive nature of drilling and the fixed costs associated with new wells. The results also show short-run asymmetry with respect to both oil prices and oil production consistent with companies taking advantage of upturns quickly and refraining from costly shut-in, plug and abandon, or increased expenditures on improved oil recovery during downturns.
    • Controlling Wolbachia transmission and invasion dynamics among aedes aegypti population via impulsive control strategy

      Dianavinnarasi, Joseph; Raja, Ramachandran; Alzabut, Jehad; Niezabitowski, Michał; Bagdasar, Ovidiu; Alagappa University, Karaikudi, India; Prince Sultan University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Silesian University of Technology, Akademicka 16, Gliwice, Poland; University of Derby (MDPI AG, 2021-03-08)
      This work is devoted to analyzing an impulsive control synthesis to maintain the self-sustainability of Wolbachia among Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes. The present paper provides a fractional order Wolbachia invasive model. Through fixed point theory, this work derives the existence and uniqueness results for the proposed model. Also, we performed a global Mittag-Leffler stability analysis via Linear Matrix Inequality theory and Lyapunov theory. As a result of this controller synthesis, the sustainability of Wolbachia is preserved and non-Wolbachia mosquitoes are eradicated. Finally, a numerical simulation is established for the published data to analyze the nature of the proposed Wolbachia invasive model.
    • Creating a compassionate world: addressing the conflicts between sharing and caring versus controlling and holding evolved strategies

      Gilbert, Paul; University of Derby (Frontiers Media SA, 2021-02-10)
      For thousands of years, various spiritual traditions and social activists have appealed to humans to adopt compassionate ways of living to address the suffering of life. Yet, along with our potential for compassion and self-sacrifice, the last few thousand years of wars, slavery, tortures, and holocausts have shown humans can be extraordinarily selfish, callous, vicious, and cruel. While there has been considerable engagement with these issues, particularly in the area of moral psychology and ethics, this paper explores an evolutionary analysis relating to evolved resource-regulation strategies that can be called “care and share” versus “control and hold.” Control and hold are typical of primates that operate through intimidatory social hierarchies. Care and share are less common in non-human primates, but evolved radically in humans during our hunter-gatherer stage when our ancestors lived in relatively interdependent, small, mobile groups. In these groups, individualistic, self-focus, and self-promoting control and hold strategies (trying to secure and accumulate more than others) were shunned and shamed. These caring and sharing hunter-gatherer lifestyles also created the social contexts for the evolution of new forms of childcare and complex human competencies for language, reasoning, planning, empathy, and self-awareness. As a result of our new ‘intelligence’, our ancestors developed agriculture that reduced mobility, increased group size, resource availability and storage, and resource competition. These re-introduced competing for, rather than sharing of, resources and advantaged those who now pursue (often aggressively) control and hold strategies. Many of our most typical forms of oppressive and anti-compassionate behavior are the result of these strategies. Rather than (just) thinking about individuals competing with one another, we can also consider these different resource regulation strategies as competing within populations shaping psychophysiological patterns; both wealth and poverty change the brain. One of the challenges to creating a more compassionate society is to find ways to create the social and economic conditions that regulate control and hold strategies and promote care and share. No easy task.
    • A mixed-methods evaluation of care (cancer and rehabilitation exercise): a physical activity and health intervention, delivered in a community football trust

      Rutherford, Zoe; Zwolinsky, Stephen; Kime, Nicky; Pringle, Andy; University of Queensland; Yorkshire and Harrogate Cancer Alliance; Bradford Institute for Health Research; University of Derby (MDPI, 2021-03-23)
      With increasing cancer survivorship has come an increased necessity to support people living with cancer (PLWC) to have a good quality of life including being physically active. Using mixed methods, the current study aimed to use the RE-AIM evaluation framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) to determine how the football community trust delivered CARE (Cancer and Rehabilitation Exercise) intervention was able to increase participants’ physical activity in order to improve their quality of life and regain physiological and psychological function. Quantitative outcome data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months using the Cancer Physical Activity Standard Evaluation Framework questionnaire. Semi-structured focus groups (n = 5) captured participants’ (n = 40) lived experience of the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance of CARE. Questionnaire data were analysed using repeated measures ANOVAs and qualitative data were thematically analysed. Following diagnosis, CARE was successful in providing participants with a unique and accessible opportunity to become or restart physically activity, by providing a local, socially supportive, and inclusive environment. This resulted in significant increases in physical activity (F(1.58, 23) = 5.98, p = 0.009), quality of life (QoL) (F(2,36) = 13.12, p = 0.000) and significant reductions in fatigue (F(1.57,31) = 11.19, p = 0.000) over 6 months. Participants also reported becoming more active, recovering physical function, regaining independence, and enhanced psychological well-being as a result of attending CARE. Key design features of CARE were also identified across RE-AIM. CARE, a football community trust delivered physical activity intervention was successful in significantly improving participants’ QoL and in regaining the physical and psychological functioning of people living with cancer. Results suggest that maintaining engagement in CARE for 6 months and beyond can support people to maintain these changes. Engaging in robust evaluations such as this can help organizations to successfully secure future funding for their programs.
    • Access to medicine in developing countries: instituting state obligation over corporate profit

      YUSUF, HAKEEM OLAYINKA; Omoteso, Kamil; University of Derby (Indiana University Press, 2021)
      This paper investigates the divergence between the objectives of the State in ensuring the right to health of citizens and the profit maximization objective of pharmaceutical corporations in relation to access to, and supply of, medicine. This is pertinent given the rising cost of medicines and unmet needs, particularly in developing countries. This paper analyses the contention between pharmaceutical corporations’ profit drive and the State’s welfare obligation. There is a need to bridge the gap between business and human rights and this can be achieved by combining the concepts of ‘business ethical responsibility’ and corporation’s contributions to ‘common good’ with the jurisprudence on the right to health. This is imperative in view of the impact of the business of pharmaceutical corporations on vulnerable populations particularly in, but not limited to, developing countries.
    • A systematic review of self-report measures of negative self-referential emotions developed for non-clinical child and adolescent samples

      Ashra, Hajra; Barnes, Christopher; Stupple, Edward; Maratos, Frances A.; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-02-05)
      The crisis in child and adolescent mental health and wellbeing has prompted the development of school and community-based interventions to tackle negative emotions towards the self. Providing an evidence-base for such interventions is therefore a priority for policy makers and practitioners. This paper presents the first systematic review of self-referential and self-report measures of negative emotions for use with non-clinical child/adolescent populations, and evaluation of their psychometric properties. A systematic search of electronic databases and grey literature was conducted. Peer reviewed articles that introduced a new measure or included psychometric evaluation of a negative self-referential emotion for children and/or adolescents were identified. Study characteristics were extracted, and psychometric properties rated using internationally recognised quality criteria. Initially, 98 measures designed for evaluating children and adolescents’ negative self-referential emotions were found. Measures were primarily excluded if they were intended for clinical diagnosis or did not focus on self-referential emotions. The remaining eight measures (Brief Shame and Guilt Questionnaire; Self-Consciousness Scale-Children; Shame and Guilt Scale for Adolescents; Test of Self-Conscious Affect- Adolescents; The Child-Adolescent Perfectionism Scale [CAPS]; Child and Adolescent Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Revised; Children Automatic Thoughts Scale [CATS]; Negative Affect Self-Statement Questionnaire) were organised into domains consisting of self-conscious emotions, self-oriented perfectionism and negative self-cognitions. Psychometric quality ratings identified the CAPS (Flett et al. in J Psychoeduc Assess 34:634–652, 2016) and the CATS (Schniering and Rapee in Behav Res Ther 40:1091–1109, 2002) as having the strongest psychometric qualities. However, all reviewed measures lacked full evaluation of essential psychometric properties. Our review revealed a paucity of self-referential emotional measures suitable for assessing adverse negative self-referential emotions in general child and adolescent populations. Measures suitable for use in non-clinical samples were identified, but these require further evaluation and/or new scale developments are needed. The psychometric findings and methodological issues identified will guide researchers and practitioners to make evidence-based decisions in order to select optimal measures.
    • Foresee the glory and train better: Narcissism, goal-setting and athlete training

      Zhang, Shuge; Roberts, Ross; Woodman, Tim; Pitkethly, Amanda; English, Cedric; Nightingale, David; University of Derby; Bangor University; Edinburgh Napier University (American Psychological Association, 2021-03)
      Grandiose narcissism may be debilitative to athlete training because the opportunity for self-enhancement that motivates narcissists to strive is normally absent in training environments. However, this view ignores the divergent influences of the self-inflated (reflecting over-confidence) and dominant (reflecting willingness for dominance) facets of grandiose narcissism. We expected that self-inflated narcissism would undermine athlete training, but only when dominant narcissism was low. This is because dominant narcissism may serve as the catalyst that drives those with self-inflated narcissism to train well. We further considered goal-setting as a practical means of alleviating the negative influence of self-inflated narcissism in training. Goal-setting provides athletes with an exciting vision of the future and thus can be an important self-enhancement strategy to engage narcissistic athletes in training. In the present study, 321 athletes completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI-40) and the goal-setting subscale in the Test of Performance Strategies-3 (TOPS-3). Coaches of these athletes assessed training behaviors using the Quality of Training Inventory (QTI). Self-inflated narcissism predicted higher levels of (coach-rated) distractibility and poorer quality of preparation only when both dominant narcissism and goal-setting were low (and not when either was high). The findings suggest that dominant narcissism and goal-setting protect against the adverse influences of self-inflated narcissism on athlete training. The work underscores the importance of considering grandiose narcissism as a multidimensional construct and supports goal-setting as a useful self-enhancement strategy.
    • The management of urinary tract infections in older patients within an urgent care out of hours setting

      Dexter, Justine; Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (MAG, 2021-03-26)
      This article critically analyses the prevalence, assessment and management of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients over the age of 65, in an urgent care out-of-hours service in order to enhance care. It is undertaken from the perspective of working as an Advanced Nurse Practitioner (ANP). A synopsis of UTI is presented, examining the epidemiology and aetiology. The process of assessment, diagnosis and management of UTI in older people is appraised based on current evidence. Difficulties associated with the recognition of UTI in elderly are evaluated. Finally, recommendations are made for the improvement of future practice as an ANP.
    • Nexus of circular economy and sustainable performance in the era of digitalization

      Agrawal, Rohit; Wankhede, Vishal Ashok; Kumar, Anil; Upadhyay, Arvind; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; National Institute of Technology Tiruchirappalli, Tiruchirappalli, India; Pandit Deendayal Energy University, Gandhinagar, India; London Metropolitan University; University of Brighton; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-04-01)
      This study aims to conduct a comprehensive review and network-based analysis by exploring future research directions in the nexus of circular economy (CE) and sustainable business performance (SBP) in the context of digitalization. A systematic literature review methodology was adopted to present the review in the field of CE and SBP in the era of digitalization. WOS and SCOPUS databases were considered in the study to identify and select the articles. The bibliometric study was carried out to analyze the significant contributions made by authors, various journal sources, countries and different universities in the field of CE and SBP in the era of digitalization. Further, network analysis is carried out to analyze the collaboration among authors from different countries. The study revealed that digitalization could be a great help in developing sustainable circular products. Moreover, the customers' involvement is necessary for creating innovative sustainable circular products using digitalization. A move toward the product-service system was suggested to accelerate the transformation toward CE and digitalization. The paper discusses digitalization and CE practices' adoption to enhance the SP of the firms. This work's unique contribution is the systematic literature analysis and bibliometric study to explore future research directions in the nexus of CE and SP in the context of digitalization. The present study has been one of the first efforts to examine the literature of CE and SBP integration from a digitalization perspective along with bibliometric analysis.
    • Targeted ensemble machine classification approach for supporting IOT enabled skin disease detection

      Yu, Hong Qing; Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan; University of Derby (IEEE, 2021-03-26)
      The fast development of the Internet of Things (IoT) changes our life in many areas, especially in the health domain. For example, remote disease diagnosis can be achieved more efficiently with advanced IoT-technologies which not only include hardware but also smart IoT data processing and learning algorithms, e.g. image-based disease classification. In this paper, we work in a specific area of skin condition classification. This research work aims to provide an implementable solution for IoT-led remote skin disease diagnosis applications. The research output can be concluded into three folders. The first folder is about dynamic AI model configuration supported IoT-Fog-Cloud remote diagnosis architecture with hardware examples. The second folder is the evaluation survey regarding the performances of machine learning models for skin disease detection. The evaluation contains a variety of data processing methods and their aggregations. The evaluation takes account of both training-testing and cross-testing validations on all seven conditions and individual condition. In addition, the HAM10000 dataset is picked for the evaluation process according to the suitability comparisons to other relevant datasets. In the evaluation, we discuss the earlier work of ANN, SVM and KNN models, but the evaluation process mainly focuses on six widely applied Deep Learning models of VGG16, Inception, Xception, MobileNet, ResNet50 and DenseNet161. The result shows that each of the top four models for the major seven skin conditions has better performance for the specific condition than others. Based on the evaluation discovery, the last folder proposes a novel classification approach of the Targeted Ensemble Machine Classify Model (TEMCM) to enable dynamically combining a suitable model in a two-phase detection process. The final evaluation result shows the proposed model can archive better performance.
    • Unethical practices within medical research and publication – An exploratory study.

      Sivasubramaniam, shivadas; Consetino, M; Ribeiro, L; Marino, F; University of Derby; University of Insubria, Via Ravasi, 2, 21100, Varese, VA, Italy (Springer Nature, 2021-04-01)
      The data produced by the scientific community impacts on academia, clinicians, and the general public; therefore, the scientific community and other regulatory bodies have been focussing on ethical codes of conduct. Despite the measures taken by several research councils, unethical research, publishing and/or reviewing behaviours still take place. This exploratory study considers some of the current unethical practices and the reasons behind them and explores the ways to discourage these within research and other professional disciplinary bodies. These interviews/discussions with PhD students, technicians, and academics/principal investigators (PIs) (N=110) were conducted mostly in European higher education institutions including UK, Italy, Ireland, Portugal, Czech Republic and Netherlands. Through collegiate discussions, sharing experiences and by examining previously published/reported information, authors have identified several less reported behaviours. Some of these practices are mainly influenced either by the undue institutional expectations of research esteem or by changes in the journal review process. These malpractices can be divided in two categories relating to (a) methodological malpractices including data management, and (b) those that contravene publishing ethics. The former is mostly related to “committed bias”, by which the author selectively uses the data to suit their own hypothesis, methodological malpractice relates to selection of out-dated protocols that are not suited to the intended work. Although these are usually unintentional, incidences of intentional manipulations have been reported to authors of this study. For example, carrying out investigations without positive (or negative) controls; but including these from a previous study. Other methodological malpractices include unfair repetitions to gain statistical significance, or retrospective ethical approvals. In contrast, the publication related malpractices such as authorship malpractices, ethical clearance irregularities have also been reported. The findings also suggest a globalised approach with clear punitive measures for offenders is needed to tackle this problem.
    • Application of caputo–fabrizio operator to suppress the aedes aegypti mosquitoes via wolbachia: an LMI approach

      Dianavinnarasi, J.; Raja, R.; Alzabut, J.; Cao, J.; Niezabitowski, M.; Bagdasar, O.; Alagappa University, Karaikudi, India; Prince Sultan University, Riyadh 12435, Saudi Arabia; Southeast University, Nanjing, China; Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2021-02-11)
      The aim of this paper is to establish the stability results based on the approach of Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI) for the addressed mathematical model using Caputo–Fabrizio operator (CF operator). Firstly, we extend some existing results of Caputo fractional derivative in the literature to a new fractional order operator without using singular kernel which was introduced by Caputo and Fabrizio. Secondly, we have created a mathematical model to increase Cytoplasmic Incompatibility (CI) in Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes by releasing Wolbachia infected mosquitoes. By this, we can suppress the population density of A.Aegypti mosquitoes and can control most common mosquito-borne diseases such as Dengue, Zika fever, Chikungunya, Yellow fever and so on. Our main aim in this paper is to examine the behaviours of Caputo–Fabrizio operator over the logistic growth equation of a population system then, prove the existence and uniqueness of the solution for the considered mathematical model using CF operator. Also, we check the alpha-exponential stability results for the system via linear matrix inequality technique. Finally a numerical example is provided to check the behaviour of the CF operator on the population system by incorporating the real world data available in the known literature.
    • Pseudoprimality related to the generalized Lucas sequences

      Andrica, Dorin; Bagdasar, Ovidiu; Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2021-03-13)
      Some arithmetic properties and new pseudoprimality results concerning generalized Lucas sequences are presented. The findings are connected to the classical Fibonacci, Lucas, Pell, and Pell–Lucas pseudoprimality. During the process new integer sequences are found and some conjectures are formulated.