Now showing items 21-40 of 4697

    • Accelerometer-based physical activity levels differ between week and weekend ways in British preschool children

      Roscoe, Clare M. P.; James, Rob S.; Duncan, Michael J.; University of Derby; Coventry University (MDPI AG, 2019-09-12)
      Participation in physical activity (PA) is fundamental to children’s future health. Studies examining the temporal pattern of PA between weekdays and weekends in British preschool children are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare PA levels between week and weekend days for UK preschool children, using objective measurements. One hundred and eighty-five preschool children (99 boys, 86 girls, aged 4–5 years), from central England wore a triaxial accelerometer (GENEActiv) for 4 days to determine PA. The time (min) and percentage (%) of time spent in light, moderate and vigorous PA (MVPA) was determined using specific cut-points for counts per minute related to 3–5 year olds. Of the sample, none of the children met the UK recommended 180 min or more of PA per day. A significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between the amount of time that preschool children spent in sedentary behaviours on weekdays (91.9%) compared to weekend days (96.9%). During weekdays and weekend days, 6.3% and 2.0% of time was spent in MVPA, respectively. Therefore, a substantial proportion of British preschool children’s day is spent in sedentary behaviours, with less MVPA accrued during the weekend. Regular engagement during the weekdays provides opportunities to accrue PA, which may not be present on weekend days.
    • First observation of an attractive interaction between a proton and a cascade baryon

      Acharya, S.; Adamová, D.; Adhya, S. P.; Adler, A.; Adolfsson, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; et al. (American Physical Society (APS), 2019-09-13)
      This Letter presents the first experimental observation of the attractive strong interaction between a proton and a multistrange baryon (hyperon) Ξ−. The result is extracted from two-particle correlations of combined p−Ξ−⊕¯p−¯Ξ+ pairs measured in p−Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02 TeV at the LHC with ALICE. The measured correlation function is compared with the prediction obtained assuming only an attractive Coulomb interaction and a standard deviation in the range [3.6, 5.3] is found. Since the measured p−Ξ−⊕¯p−¯Ξ+ correlation is significantly enhanced with respect to the Coulomb prediction, the presence of an additional, strong, attractive interaction is evident. The data are compatible with recent lattice calculations by the HAL-QCD Collaboration, with a standard deviation in the range [1.8, 3.7]. The lattice potential predicts a shallow repulsive Ξ− interaction within pure neutron matter and this implies stiffer equations of state for neutron-rich matter including hyperons. Implications of the strong interaction for the modeling of neutron stars are discussed.
    • GORTS: genetic algorithm based on one-by-one revision of two sides for dynamic travelling salesman problems

      Xu, Xiaolong; Yuan, Hao; Matthew, Peter; Ray, Jeffrey; Bagdasar, Ovidiu; Trovati, Marcello; University of Derby; Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, China; Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, UK (Springer, 2019-09-21)
      The dynamic travelling salesman problem (DTSP) is a natural extension of the standard travelling salesman problem, and it has attracted significant interest in recent years due to is practical applications. In this article, we propose an efficient solution for DTSP, based on a genetic algorithm (GA), and on the one-by-one revision of two sides (GORTS). More specifically, GORTS combines the global search ability of GA with the fast convergence feature of the method of one-by-one revision of two sides, in order to find the optimal solution in a short time. An experimental platform was designed to evaluate the performance of GORTS with TSPLIB. The experimental results show that the efficiency of GORTS compares favourably against other popular heuristic algorithms for DTSP. In particular, a prototype logistics system based on GORTS for a supermarket with an online map was designed and implemented. It was shown that this can provide optimised goods distribution routes for delivery staff, while considering real-time traffic information.
    • Effects of the graphene nanoplatelets reinforced interphase on mechanical properties of carbon fibre reinforced polymer – A multiscale modelling study

      Le, Huirong; Lu, Yiling; Pawlik, Marzena; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-07-05)
      Mechanical properties of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) are greatly affected by an interphase between fibre and matrix. Coating fibre with nanofillers has been suggested to improve the interphase properties. In this paper, a multiscale modelling framework was developed to investigate how graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) influence the mechanical properties of CFRP laminate by reinforcing the interphase. At the nanoscale, the Mori-Tanaka homogenisation method was used to determine effective properties of the GnPs reinforced interphase. GnPs reinforced interphase properties at different GnPs orientations, and volume fractions were examined. At the microscale, a 3-D representative volume element (RVE) model based on obtained interphase properties was used to predict the elastic constants of CFRP unidirectional lamina. This RVE model consisted of three phases: carbon fibre, epoxy resin and the GnPs reinforced interphase. The incorporation of GnPs in the interphase increased both longitudinal and transverse lamina moduli. Finally, simulations of the three-point bending test were performed on the macroscale CFRP laminate. The macroscale modelling based on predicted lamina properties was found to reproduce experimentally measured flexural modulus well. It was found that the GnPs coating on fibre has a positive influence on the mechanical properties of CFRP, and the enhancement varied with orientation and local volume fraction of GnPs. In the presence of GnPs coating, 0° and 90° flexural moduli of CFRP laminate increased by 6.1% and 28.3% respectively.
    • Social and environmental sustainability model on consumers’ altruism, green purchase intention, green brand loyalty, and evangelism

      Panda, T. K.; Kumar, A; Jakhar, S; Luthra, S; Garza-Reyes, J. A.; Kazancoglu, I; Nayak, S.S.; University of Derby; OP Jindal Global University, India; Indian Institute of Management Lucknow, India; et al. (Elsevier, 2019-09-26)
      Across the globe, the awareness for environmental degradation and its harmful effects is rapidly growing. The whole world has come together to work in the direction to protect the environment. Consumers are increasingly becoming cautious towards the impact of their consumption pattern on environment and organisations can attain a competitive edge by leveraging this cautiousness by offering them green products/brands. However, it is importance for the marketers to understand that how increasing levels of sustainability awareness impacts other factors which explain pro-environmental behaviour of customers. To fill the existing gap in the current literature in this regard, the current study aims to build a structural model which includes social and environmental sustainability awareness in measuring customer altruism, buying intention, loyalty and customer evangelism. The theoretical model extends the existing framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and explores the decision-making framework regarding ethical behaviour. Through existing literature review and expert input, the indicators (variables) for each construct were recognised. After that, data was collected from 331 respondents through a structurally designed questionnaire; the hypothetical model was test using the Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) technique. The findings of the study indicate that sustainability awareness positively influence the consumer altruism which in turn enhances the consumer purchase intention, green brand loyalty and green brand evangelism and altruism can and can bridge value-action gap for green brands. Current analysis supports the view that there are significant positive associations among the identified constructs.
    • Sensitivity of economic policy uncertainty to investor sentiment

      Rehman, Mobeen Ur; Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus; University of Derby; Institute of Science and Technology Islamabad, Pakistan (Emerald, 2019-06-24)
      A series of global financial crises in 21st century, steep economic decline and slow recoveries have intensified the concern of regulatory bodies for economic policy certainty. This study explores the effect of investor sentiment on economic policy uncertainty (EPU), spanning the period 1995-2015. The analysis is carried out for Asian, Developed and the European market samples by applying the method of quantile regressions. The findings document the presence of a negative impact of investor sentiment on EPU. Robustness analysis illustrates the validity of the results for the cases of Asian and Developed markets.
    • Slow on the draw: the representation of turtles, terrapins and tortoises in children’s literature

      Beaumont, Ellen S.; Briers, Erin; Harrison, Emma; University of Derby; The Orkney Campus of Heriot-Watt University, Stromness (Springer, 2019-08-08)
      Children’s picture books, both fiction and non-fiction, play a vital role in introducing the reader to the natural world. Here we examine the representation of turtles, terrapins and tortoises (Testudines) in 204 English language picture books and find a mean of 3.9 (SD 9.1) basic biological errors per book. Only 83 (40.7%) of the examined books were found to be error-free in the representation of Testudines, with no significant improvement in biological accuracy being observed over time (book publication date range 1974–2017). Suggestions are made as to how biological accuracy of children’s literature could be improved to help foster children’s understanding and wonder of the natural world. Fantasy and imagination have an important role within children’s literature, but here it is argued that the books children read should support future generations having sufficient understanding of the natural world to imagine the solutions to current environmental problems. A role of children’s picture books should not be to reinforce biological illiteracy.
    • Mr Cameron's new language initiative for Muslim women: lessons in policy implementation

      Turner, Royce; Wigfield, Andrea; University of Huddersfield (Wiley-Blackwell, 2016-05-19)
      As the government announces a programme to teach Muslim women to speak English, this article examines how such a policy can be implemented successfully, arguing that lessons can be drawn from both academic research, especially that carried out with Muslim women themselves, and previous successful policy application. It focuses on two projects carried out in the recent past for the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) and Jobcentre Plus, and outlines the key factors that led to their success. The LSC project involved one of the largest in‐depth surveys of Muslim women's attitudes towards work, and their views on life in Britain, that has ever been undertaken. The Jobcentre Plus project was a highly successful and innovative employment training initiative for ethnic minority women piloted in Sheffield, the very kind of ‘targeted’ approach that Mr Cameron has claimed his government's new language initiative will be.
    • Facile template-free synthesis of hierarchically porous NiO hollow architectures with high-efficiency adsorptive removal of Congo red

      Hu, Hanmei; Deng, Chonghai; Sun, Mei; Zhang, Kehua; Wang, Man; Xu, Jiayi; Le, Huirong; Hefei University; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-06-05)
      Hierarchically porous NiO hollow architectures (HPHAs) were synthesized via a one-pot facile chemical bath deposition method and followed by a calcination process. The crystal structure, component and morphology of the products were characterized by various techniques. The results revealed that hierarchical architectures with hollow interior are composed of mesoporous NiO nanoflakes with thickness of about 8 nm. Interestingly, the as-synthesized NiO HPHAs have the unusual three-ordered porous features including a microscale hollow interior and two mesoscale pores which are attributed to the holes on the surface of nanoflakes with an average diameter of about 3.9 nm and the cavities on the wall of microsphere in the range of 20–40 nm in diameter formed by interconnecting nanoflakes. These comprehensive hierarchically porous structures are beneficial for the adsorption performance towards Congo red in water. The absorptive capacity over NiO HPHAs achieved about 1.8 and 4.0 times as high as that of the precursor β-Ni(OH)2 hollow microspheres (HSs) and the commercial activity carbon (AC) under the same conditions. The studies of adsorption kinetics illustrated that the adsorption behavior perfectly obeyed the pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption isotherm fits the Langmuir adsorption assumption well. The maximum adsorption capacities were calculated to be 490.2 mg g−1 according to the Langmuir equation, which is excellent result compared to NiO absorbents. The high-efficiency adsorption capacities for NiO HPHAs are attributed to the large specific surface area, the synergistic effect of micro-mesoporous structure and the electrostatic interaction of NiO with CR molecules. Additionally, NiO HPHAs can be easily renewed and has good chemical stability, indicating a great promising absorbent in the application for the removal of diazo organics in wastewater.
    • Multilayered composite coatings of titanium dioxide nanotubes decorated with zinc oxide and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: controlled release of Zn and antimicrobial properties against <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em></p>

      Gunputh, Urvashi; Le, Huirong; Besinis, Alexandros; Tredwin, Christopher; Handy, Richard; University of Derby; Plymouth University (Dove Medical Press Ltd., 2019-05-16)
      This study aimed to decorate the surface of TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs) grown on medical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy with an antimicrobial layer of nano zinc oxide particles (nZnO) and then determine if the antimicrobial properties were maintained with a final layer of nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) on the composite. The additions of nZnO were attempted at three different annealing temperatures: 350, 450 and 550 °C. Of these temperatures, 350°C provided the most uniform and nanoporous coating and was selected for antimicrobial testing. The LIVE/DEAD assay showed that ZnCl2 and nZnO alone were >90% biocidal to the attached bacteria, and nZnO as a coating on the nanotubes resulted in around 70% biocidal activity. The lactate production assay agreed with the LIVE/DEAD assay. The concentrations of lactate produced by the attached bacteria on the surface of nZnO-coated TiO2 NTs and ZnO/HA-coated TiO2 NTs were 0.13±0.03 mM and 0.37±0.1 mM, respectively, which was significantly lower than that produced by the bacteria on TiO2 NTs alone, 1.09±0.30 mM (Kruskal–Wallis, P<0.05, n=6). These biochemical measurements were correlated with electron micrographs of cell morphology and cell coverage on the coatings. nZnO on TiO2 NTs was a stable and antimicrobial coating, and most of the biocidal properties remained in the presence of nano-HA on the coating.
    • Marginalisation and events

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-03-26)
    • The fundamentals of event design

      Antchak, Vladimir; Ramsbottom, Olivia; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-12-20)
      The Fundamentals of Event Design aims to rethink current approaches to event design and production. The textbook explores the relationship between event design and multiple visitor experiences, as well as interactivity, motivation, sensory stimuli, and co-creative participation. structured around the key phases of event design, the book covers all the critical dimensions of event concepting, atmospherics, the application of interactive technologies, project management, team leadership, creative marketing and sustainable production. The concepts of authenticity, creativity, co-creation, Imagineering and storytelling are discussed throughout, and practical step-by-step guidance is provided on how to create and deliver unique and memorable events. The chapters include industry voices offering real life insight from leading international event practitioners and individual and/or team assignments to stimulate learners’ creativity, visualisation and problem solving.
    • Sector-focused approach to business events in Manchester

      Vokacova, Zuzana; Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
    • Small cities with big dreams: creative placemaking and branding strategies

      Antchak, Vladimir; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-09-12)
    • Event portfolio management: theory and methods for event management and tourism

      Antchak, Vladimir; Ziakas, Vassilios; Getz, Donald; University of Derby; Plymouth Marjon University; University of Calgary (Goodfellow, 2019-09-05)
      Event Portfolio Management' explores the phenomenon of the event portfolio as a policy tool for cities and destinations. Divided into two parts – ‘Theory’ and ‘Practice’ – the book critically analyses and summarises key underpinnings behind portfolio theory development and identifies key trends and issues in the event portfolio approach. It examines the processes of event portfolio development and management, leveraging, stakeholder networking and collaboration, portfolio design, risk assessment and evaluation. With a wide geographical reach, the book introduces the results of empirical research from different international case studies, including Auckland, Wellington and Dunedin in New Zealand, Canberra and Melbourne in Australia, and Manchester and Edinburgh in the UK.
    • SENCO induction pack: Supporting you at the start of your journey

      Whatton, Julie; Codina, Geraldene; Middleton, Tristan; Esposito, Rosanne; Department for Education; NASEN (Whole School SEND/DfE/LLSENDCiC/nasen, 2019-04)
      This induction pack has been designed by SENCOs for SENCOs as a useful reference tool that can be used from day one of undertaking this important role. It can be a valuable asset to both new and experienced professionals alike and we would recommend it to all SENCOs. We understand that the role is context-specific and so, instead of trying to prescribe a single approach, this induction pack sets out the key operational considerations so that SENCOs can make more informed decisions. This SENCO Induction Pack has been developed by Leading Learning for SEND Community Interest Company as part of a suite of resources developed by the Whole School SEND Consortium3, hosted by nasen4, to embed good SEND provision in schools. This project was funded by the Department for Education. As such, the induction pack includes references to a broad range of organisations, resources and documents from across the SEND community. This is in keeping with one of the wider principles of Whole School SEND, which is to maximise the use of existing resources to save schools time and money.
    • The mediating role of shared flow and perceived emotional synchrony on compassion for others in a mindful-dancing program

      Pizarro, José J.; Basabe, Nekane; Amutio, Alberto; Telletxea, Saioa; Harizmendi, Miren; Van Gordon, William; University of Derby; University of the Basque Country, Spain (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2019-08-02)
      While there is a growing understanding of the relationship between mindfulness and compassion, this largely relates to the form of mindfulness employed in first-generation mindfulness-based interventions such as Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction. Consequently, there is limited knowledge of the relationship between mindfulness and compassion in respect of the type of mindfulness employed in second-generation mindfulness-based interventions (SG-MBIs), including those that employ the principle of working harmoniously as a “secular sangha.” Understanding this relationship is important because research indicates that perceived emotional synchrony (PES) and shared flow—that often arise during participation in harmonized group contemplative activities—can enhance outcomes relating to compassion, subjective well-being, and group identity fusion. This pilot study analyzed the effects of participation in a mindful-dancing SG-MBI on compassion and investigated the mediating role of shared flow and PES. A total of 130 participants were enrolled into the study that followed a quasi-experimental design with an intervention and control group. Results confirmed the salutary effect of participating in a collective mindful-dancing program, and demonstrated that shared flow and PES fully meditated the effects of collective mindfulness on the kindness and common humanity dimensions of compassion. Further research is warranted to explore whether collective mindfulness approaches, such as mindful dancing, may be a means of enhancing compassion and subjective well-being outcomes due to the mediating role of PES and shared flow.
    • Emirati women’s experiences of consanguineous marriage: A qualitative exploration of attitudes, health challenges, and coping styles

      Van Buren, Fiona; Van Gordon, William; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-08-26)
      Consanguineous marriage is associated with increased risk of congenital physical disabilities, as well as behavioural and mental health problems among consanguineous offspring. Furthermore, mental health problems have been highlighted as being prevalent among women involved in consanguineous marriages. Despite this, there has been limited research exploring the lived experiences of consanguineous marriage among women living in the United Arab Emirates, where up to 39% of all marriages are consanguineous. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of Emirati women involved in a consanguineous marriage in order to improve understanding of the experiential challenges faced by such individuals. Six Emirati women involved in a consanguineous marriage attended a focus group, and a thematic analysis of the interview transcript was subsequently undertaken. Five master themes emerged from the dataset: (i) Reasons for Marrying Consanguineously, (ii) Awareness and Fear of Hereditary Diseases, (iii) Emotional and Psychological Challenges, (iv) Coping Mechanisms, and (v) Confidence in Consanguineous Marriages. The master themes indicated a high level of family and parental influence as well as a cultural/traditional paradigm as being key causes for entering into a consanguineous marriage. Emotional and mental health challenges arouse due to the fear of genetic problems among offspring as well as difficulties coming to terms with consanguineous marriage dynamics. Self-help coping strategies were identified such as participants turning to religion in times of need, while shunning professional psychological help. Despite these challenges, participants generally retained confidence in the consanguineous marriage process. Findings shed light on the personal and health challenges experienced by Emirati women involved in consanguineous marriages, and highlight the need for further research to better understand the support needs of this population group.
    • Alternative research methods: introducing marketing sensing, a qualitative and interpretive perspective on research

      Longbottom, David; Lawson, Alison; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-12-07)
      This chapter examines research from an interpretive perspective where qualitative methods are predominantly used. We present that qualitative methods may be used by researchers seeking to gain deeper insights and understanding of underlying issues particularly in the context of social science studies which often involve people and organisations in a social setting. We will argue that such methods can be used within an interpretive philosophy, or may be combined with quantitative methods in a pragmatic and mixed methods approach. Whilst the chapter considers traditional methods associated with qualitative research, such as depth interview and focus group, it also introduces several alternative methods and techniques which may be used by researchers seeking to gain creativity in their research design and presentation and provide deeper understanding to build their analysis and research conclusions. The chapter is arranged in two parts. In part one, we examine issues of context, philosophy, approach and strategy. In part two, we examine issues of strategy and methods, planning, data collection, and data presentation.
    • Temporal patterns: Smart-type reasoning and applications

      Chuckravanen, Dineshen; Daykin, Jacqueline; Hunsdale, Karen; Seeam, Amar; Aberythwyth University (Mauritius Branch Campus) (International Academy, Research, and Industry Association (IARIA), 2017-02)
      Allen’s interval algebra is a calculus for temporal reasoning that was introduced in 1983. Reasoning with quali- tative time in Allen’s full interval algebra is nondeterministic polynomial time (NP) complete. Research since 1995 identified maximal tractable subclasses of this algebra via exhaustive computer search and also other ad-hoc methods. In 2003, the full classification of complexity for satisfiability problems over con- straints in Allen’s interval algebra was established algebraically. Recent research proposed scheduling based on the Fishburn- Shepp correlation inequality for posets. We describe here three potential temporal-related application areas as candidates for scheduling using this inequality