Now showing items 21-40 of 4874

    • From genre to zenre

      Callow, Christos; Birkbeck, University of London (Birbeck, University of London, 2014)
    • Creep damage of BGA solder interconnects subjected to thermal cycling and isothermal ageing

      Depiver, Joshua Adeniyi; Mallik, Sabuj; Amalu, Emeka H; Harmanto, Dani; University of Derby (IEEE Xplore, 2019-12)
      Solder joints of electronic components are the most critical part of any electronic device. Their untimely failure during the system’s operation often culminates in catastrophic failure of the device. The determination of creep damage in electronic component solder joint is vital to the prediction of crack initiation and prevention of premature failure. This paper presents the creep damage in solder joints in a ball grid array (BGA) soldered on a printed circuit board (PCB) and subjected to thermal cycling as well as isothermal ageing. ANSYS 19.0 package is employed to model the isothermal gaining at -40, 25, 75 and 150℃ temperatures for 45 days. Standard temperature cycle profile is used to simulate the effect of the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch on the bonded materials in the BGA component. The solders studied are lead-based eutectic solder alloy and lead-free SAC396, SAC387, and SAC305. Based on the results obtained for the stress, strain and strain energy of the solders, the research investigation advises on the most effective solder for achieving improvement in the thermo-mechanical reliability of solder joints in BGA soldered on PCB.
    • Intrasexual competition as a predictor of women’s judgements of revenge pornography offending

      Fido, Dean; Harper, Craig, A; Davis, Mia; Petronzi, Dominic; Worrall, Sophie; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (Sage, 2019-12-25)
      Recent legislative developments have led to a marked increase in the empirical investigation of motivations and judgements of so-called acts of ‘revenge pornography’ offending. In two independently-sampled studies, we used moderation analyses to investigate whether higher levels of intrasexual competition predicted more lenient judgements of revenge pornography offences as a function of sex (Study 1, N = 241), and whether such relationships would be further moderated by physical attractiveness (Study 2, N = 402). Potential covariates of callous-unemotional traits, empathy, and victimization history were controlled for. Opposing our hypotheses, we consistently observed a trend for higher levels of intrasexual competition being associated with more lenient judgements of revenge pornography offences involving male victims by female participants. The results are discussed in terms of intrasexual competition potentially sharing variance with unobserved constructs in the wider sexological literature, and of the key relevance of these findings for future empirical investigation into judgements of non-consensual image-based offending. Open data and a preprint of this paper are available at https://osf.io/y29fq/?view_only=568a2c403fcf428280914c149063db95.
    • Exploring the ZMET methodology in services marketing

      Hancock, Charles C.; Foster, Carley; University of Derby (Emerald, 2019-12-16)
      This paper aims to explore how the Zaltman metaphor elicitation technique (ZMET) can be adopted in services marketing to provide deeper customer experience insights. This paper explores how ZMET interviews, which use images selected by the participant to facilitate discussion, can be used by researchers. This paper draws upon a study of 24 student experiences at a UK university. Adopting this qualitative method for services marketing can counter depth deficit when compared to other qualitative approaches, because it is participant led. However, the method requires competent interview skills and time for the interview and analysis. We find that ZMET has not been widely adopted in academia because of its commercial licenced use. The paper illustrates how to use the ZMET process step-by-step. Findings are limited to student experiences. Further research is necessary to understand how researchers could use ZMET in other areas of services marketing. This paper provides guidance to researchers on how to use ZMET as a methodological tool. ZMET facilitates a deeper understanding of service experiences through using participant chosen images and thus enabling researchers to uncover subconscious hidden perceptions that other methods may not find. ZMET has been used commercially to gain market insights but has had limited application in service research. Existing studies fail to provide details of how ZMET can be used to access the consumer subconscious. This paper makes a methodological contribution by providing step-by-step guidance on how to apply ZMET to services marketing.
    • Numerical analysis of flow in the gap of a simplified tractor-trailer model with cross vortex trap device

      charles, terrance; Yang, Zhiyin; lu, yiling; University of Derby (World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, 2019-12)
      Heavy trucks are aerodynamically inefficient due to their un-streamlined body shapes, leading to more than of 60% engine power being required to overcome the aerodynamics drag at 60 m/hr. There are many aerodynamics drag reduction devices developed and this paper presents a study on a drag reduction device called Cross Vortex Trap Device (CVTD) deployed in the gap between the tractor and the trailer of a simplified tractor-trailer model. Numerical simulations have been carried out at Reynolds number 0.51×106 based on inlet flow velocity and height of the trailer using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. Three different configurations of CVTD have been studied, ranging from single to three slabs, equally spaced on the front face of the trailer. Flow field around three different configurations of trap device have been analysed and presented. The results show that a maximum of 12.25% drag reduction can be achieved when a triple vortex trap device is used. Detailed flow field analysis along with pressure contours are presented to elucidate the drag reduction mechanisms of CVTD and why the triple vortex trap configuration produces the maximum drag reduction among the three configurations tested.
    • A measure of nature connectedness for children and adults: Validation, performance, and insights

      Richardson, Miles; Hunt, Anne; Hinds, Joe; Bragg, Rachel; Fido, Dean; Petronzi, Dominic; Barbett, Lea; Clitherow, Theodore; White, Matthew; University of Derby; et al. (MDPI AG, 2019-06-12)
      With benefits to both human well-being and pro-nature conservation behaviors, nature connectedness is emerging as an important psychological construct for a sustainable future. The growing research and applied and policy-related interests require a straightforward measure of nature connectedness that is suitable for both children and adult populations. To establish the reliability of the new Nature Connection Index (NCI) three factor analyses were conducted. One was based on a large Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment (MENE) dataset for adults (n = 3568) with a replication from data sets collected online (n = 553), and a third used MENE data from children (n = 351). To validate the NCI as a measure for nature connectedness an online comparison study (n = 153) included the NCI alongside other established measures. The results showed that the NCI was a reliable and valid scale that offers a short, simple alternative to other measures of nature connectedness, particularly for populations including both children and adults, measured face to face or online. The utility of the NCI is also supported, with variations associated with various pro-environmental and pro-conservation behaviors observed, and importantly the NCI also revealed changes in nature connectedness across the lifespan.
    • ‘The postman wears out fast’: Retiring sick in London’s Victorian post office

      Green, David; Brown, Douglas; McIlvenna, Kathleen; Shelton, Nicola; Kingston University; Kings College, London; University of Derby; University College London (Taylor and Francis, 2019-09-26)
      The Post Office was an extremely important institution and London was the focal point of its operations. Throughout the nineteenth century, London was the main sorting centre and accounted for a third of the mail delivered in Britain. However, London postal workers were relatively unhealthy and the majority retired before they reached 60, mainly because of ill health. Using new evidence drawn from pension records, this article explores the extent of ill health in the London workforce, comparing it to that in the Metropolitan Police. For postmen, orthopaedic conditions were the main problem, relating to the ability to walk long distances. This was similar to the problems encountered in the police. For other postal workers, notably letter sorters, mental illness and poor vision were the main problems, relating to the pressure of having to work irregular hours, often at night-time and in poorly designed and overcrowded workspaces. These problems were exacerbated by the increasing frequency of mail deliveries and the constant shortage of space in the main headquarters building. In response to these issues and workers’ concerns, the Post Office introduced a range of measures including a medical service and generous sickness pay, more offices, new technologies to speed the flow of mail, better lighting, and changed working practices to ease pressures on the workforce.
    • A new approach for strength and stiffness prediction of discontinuous fibre reinforced composites (DFC)

      Shah, S.Z.H; Choudhry, Rizwan, Saeed; Mahadzir, Shuhaimi; University of Derby; Universiti Teknologi, Malaysia (Elsevier, 2020-12-03)
      A new modelling methodology for strength and stiffness prediction of discontinuous fibre-reinforced composites (DFC) is proposed. This has been validated for both thermoplastic and thermoset, prepreg based, carbon fibre reinforced, random DFC laminates having high volume fraction, by implementing it in a commercial FE solver. The methodology involves explicit generation of internal architecture of DFC through an algorithm which is efficient (faster model generation and solution), easily customizable and scalable. It captures many of the realistic features of the DFC such as variation in volume fraction, interlacing of strands, random orientation and thickness variation of strands. Thus, the model accounts for the natural mechanical property variation, which is characteristic of random DFCs and was found to be conservative in terms of prediction of tensile strength and stiffness for all the validation cases considered. It is generic in the sense that it can be easily extended to generate preferentially aligned and hybrid DFC laminates.
    • How the university lost its way: Sixteen threats to academic freedom

      Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-11-27)
      Are you happy to let someone tell you what to think? No one is. In universities, where academics have a particular role encapsulated in the phrase ‘academic freedom’—the responsibility to speak your mind and challenge conventional wisdom—they have a duty to refuse to be told what to think. My challenge to academics at the Higher Education Institutional Research (HEIR) Conference 2019 was that, in their unquestioning compliance with many familiar functions of the university today, they have willingly accepted innovations and impositions that do just that, tell you what to think. It is time to give them a wake-up call.
    • "The widows and orphans of servants are dying": The conflict of family in the design and application of nineteenth-century civil servant pensions

      McIlvenna, Kathleen; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-04-22)
      The Post Office is a Victorian institution. There had of course been postal systems before this time and in other places but the idea that all people in all places should be connected through the mail was a new idea. In the context of this volume, the existence and development of the Post Office network matters for two reasons. Firstly, because letters connected families and kin who were not proximately resident, and they also had the capacity to make notional kinship into a functional resource. In chapters by Steven King, Cara Dobbing and Geoff Monks elsewhere in this volume it is clear that whatever the co-residential family unit might have looked like, letters were a vital mechanism for conveying information, renewing and repairing kinship bonds and giving meaning to the fictive kinship networks that are the focus of the work of Naomi Tadmor. Secondly, in order to provide this service large (and increasing) numbers of employees were needed. This inevitably means that the nature of work for Post Office was a potent force in shaping family life, the nature of family relations and (in the sense that for some employees the Post Office acted as an alternate family) the very meaning of terms such as ‘family’ or ‘kin’. Moreover, in the sense that Post Office workers rapidly became part of a wider nineteenth-century movement for employers to provide superannuation schemes, we might expect the service to have shaped the long-term planning of family life and even the likelihood of re-marriage or the timing of children leaving home.
    • Right place right Now

      Naylor, Sarah; University of Derby (Society of Radiographers, 2019-12)
    • Representing camp: Constructing macaroni masculinity in eighteenth century visual satire

      Gowrley, Freya; University of Edinburgh (University of South Florida Tampa, 2019-05-06)
      This article asks how ‘Camp,’ as defined in Sontag’s 1964 essay, ‘Notes on Camp,’ might provide a valuable framework for the analysis of late eighteenth-century satirical prints, specifically those featuring images of the so-called ‘macaroni.’ Discussing a number of satirical prints and contemporary writings on the macaroni, the article reads them against Sontag’s text in order to establish its utility as a critical framework for understanding the images’ complex relationship of content, form, and function.
    • Craft(ing) narratives: Specimens, souvenirs, and “morsels” in A la Ronde’s specimen table

      Gowrley, Freya; University of Edinburgh (University of Toronto Press, 2018-10-16)
      This article explores the relationship between souvenir acquisition and the construction of narrative in the interior decoration of A la Ronde in Devon, home to cousins Jane and Mary Parminter. During their 1796–1811 period of homosocial cohabitation, the Parminters ornamented the property with handcrafted objects and spaces, often fabricated from souvenirs, found objects, and pieces from their family collection. While the secondary literature on A la Ronde emphasizes the appropriateness of so-called feminine crafts such as shell-work and paperwork for the decoration of a female space, this article reveals how the cousins used material objects to create complex domestic, familial, and touristic narratives. Focusing on a specimen table made around 1790, the article situates its production in relation to the histories of the Parminter family, their residence in Devon, and their extensive Continental tour. Utilizing frameworks from period travel writing, it demonstrates how the collection and creation of such objects was indivisible from the construction of narrative.
    • War and the ruby tree. The motif of the unborn generations in Jewish women’s story-telling

      Heywood, Simon; Cumbers, Shonaleigh; Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-12-27)
      The Marks/Khymberg family oral storytelling tradition, currently practised publicly by Shanaleah Khymberg (Shonaleigh Cumbers) (b. 1971), includes a large number of cycles of fairy-tale-like stories (wundermaysel), including The Ruby Tree, a many-branched story-cycle showing affinities with well-known tales such as Rapunzel and Beauty and the Beast. Like other stories in the extensive family repertoire, The Ruby Tree was learned orally by Shonaleigh in childhood from her grandmother, Edith Marks. Edith Marks herself trained and practised as a community storyteller or drut'syla (cf. Yiddish dertseyler "storyteller") in the pre-war Netherlands, before carrying the family repertoire in her memory, through Holocaust and postwar relocation to Britain, and teaching it to her grand-daughter in accordance with traditional practice. The imagery of The Ruby Tree, as the story is told by Shonaleigh today, resonates with the often traumatic history of the story's transmission from the pre-war Netherlands to the modern international storytelling circuit. We aim to discuss the story-cycle as a variant of well-known international oral folktale-types, before narrating the dramatic changes of context which the Marks/Khymberg family tradition has undergone, and drawing conclusions about the effects of war, deportation, mass-murder and postwar dispersal on the meaning of this ancient story as it re-emerges in dialogue with its modern context.
    • Are you using simulation in radiography? If not, why not?

      Shiner, Naomi; University of Derby (2018-01-31)
    • ‘When there's no underbrush the tree looks taller’: A discourse analytical examination of how men account for genital grooming

      Hall, Matthew; Arden University; University of Derby (Norton, 2019-01)
      It seems many men continue to be obsessed with their penis and especially its size and look. Two thirds of men in a recent UK study (Veale et al., 2013) reported some dissatisfaction with their genitals. Arguably much of this anxiety is perpetuated by the media and marketers, but may also follow more general trends in male body image consciousness (Grogan, 2010; Langridge et al., 2013). Marketers have been quick to offer both surgical and non-surgical remedies to help change the size, shape and image of the penis, especially online. Stepping aside from more traditional scholarly foci on culture (Lehman, 2006), media (Lehman, 2007), social (Davison, 200) and personal relationship issues (Lever et al., 2006), I focus instead on how men account for pubic hair shaving to enhance image. I discursively analyse online electronic talk in response to an advert promoting male groin grooming showing the complex ways in which men discursively negotiate their interest in this non-typical gender practice. The analysis shows charges of vanity are swept under the carpet in favour of heterosexual pleasure, cleanliness, self-respect and individuality. The implications for understanding traditional and contemporary masculinities are also discussed.
    • On-line constructions of metrosexuality and masculinities: A membership categorisation analysis

      Hall, Matthew; Gough, Brendan; Hansen, Susan; Seymour-Smith, Sarah; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (Equinox Publishing, 2017)
      The relatively recent growth of identity categories for men participating in non-conventional masculine activities can be linked to contemporary consumption and lifestyle opportunities (Gill et al. 2005). While there have been various studies pertaining to media representations of ‘metrosexuality’, ‘new’ masculinities, and the marketing of health and beauty products to men, we currently know little about how men define, ascribe to and disavow contemporary identity markers such as ‘metrosexual’. The existence of on-line forums dedicated to the discussion of metrosexuality provides an obvious opportunity to examine contemporary masculinities. In this paper we report on a study of one such internet forum, using membership categorization analysis (Sacks 1972; 1992) to investigate the deployment of metrosexuality and related identity categories. Our analysis highlights the masculinized parameters through which metrosexuality is taken up (and rejected), which include notions of vanity, conspicuous consumption, professional status and sexual prowess. The continued influence of hegemonic forms of masculinity in this context is discussed.
    • Wasta in Jordanian banking: An emic approach to a culture-specific concept of social networking and its power-implications

      Ali, Sa’ad; Weir, David; University of Worcester (Routledge, 2019-11-07)
      This chapter reviews the background and cultural implications of wasta business networking in the Jordanian banking sector. The chapter starts with exploring this practice, its origin and its use in Jordanian society and business context, highlighting how wasta is often viewed with an etic approach by its researchers and related to concepts such as corruption and favouritism. The wider context of wasta in Jordan is explored and wasta is viewed with an emic approach, drawing on insights from 17 interviews in the case of Jordanian banking sector. A more balanced exploration of wasta is offered, drawing on the role of identity and power in wasta practice and highlighting its possible benefits and drawbacks in employee selection. Reflexive considerations of using wasta to research wasta and the authors’ insider/outsider statuses are discussed and recommendations to students, researchers and practitioners are offered.
    • Sisterly guidance: elite women, sorority and the life cycle, 1770–1860

      Larsen, Ruth M.; University of Derby (Four Courts Press, 2018-03)
      This volume of essays examines the lives of women in country houses in Ireland and Britain from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. The authors present a spectrum of female house owners, residents and caretakers who were far more than bit players in the histories of families and big houses. The women featuring in these essays were all agents in their own destinies, taking charge of their lives (as much as was possible within a repressive society), as well as influencing the lives of others. They were committed to organizing households, supervising architects and builders, raising families, mobilizing political support, acquiring culinary expertise, assisting husbands or sons, writing fiction, travelling overseas, and, in one instance, undoing a late husband’s work. Drawing from a wide range of archival sources and family papers, this collection goes some way towards answering the question: ‘what did they do?’, and demonstrates the many roles women played in the appearance and running of family estates.