Now showing items 1-20 of 6198

    • Understanding parents’ contribution to young people’s career decision-making

      Clark, Lewis; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2021-04-01)
      This article summarises Erasumus funded research to establish the impacts on young people's career decsion making. The article presents data pertaining to parental influence.
    • Teaching Healthcare Professional Students in Online Learning during COVID-19: Reflection of University Lecturers

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Spink, Rachel; Brooks-Ucheaga, Michelle; Green, Pauline; Rawson, Rebecca; Rhodes, Christine; Chircop, James; Williams, Alan; Okere, Uche; Lyte, Geraldine; et al. (Concurrent Disorders Society Inc., 2021-05-13)
      Online education has been regarded as a lifeline for many education institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic, offering students a means to advance their education and career. While face-to-face teaching universities convert their education curricula to the online settings, many institutions lack effective online teaching strategies, leading to reduced student enrolment and satisfaction. Contrarily, we have been receiving an ever-increasing number of healthcare professional students in our learning department since the outbreak, while maintaining high satisfaction. These students work as registered professional key workers and study online. Among numerous measures taken to support this student group, this short paper reports four effective teaching practices we have implemented: (a) active use of adaptive learning, (b) Padlet discussions, (c) wellbeing webinars, and (d) resilience building. These teaching strategies are deemed to address weaknesses of online learning and offer emotional support to students. Our teaching practices will be useful to many universities supporting this crucial group of students in the online environment.
    • Exploring factors having an impact on attitudes and motivations towards volunteering in the undergraduate nursing student population − A comparative study of the UK and Ghana

      Dyson, Sue E.; Korsah, K.A.; Liu, L.Q.; O’Driscoll, M.; van den Akker, O.B.A; University of Derby; University of Ghana; Middlesex University (Elsevier, 2021-04-10)
      This study explores attitudes and motivations towards volunteering in nursing students in Ghana compared with nursing students in the United Kingdom (UK). Ghana traditionally follows a western model of nurse education, with students studying programmes commensurate in theory and practice, making Ghana a suitable location for a comparative study. We explored similarities and differences in attitudes and motivation towards volunteering to challenge and inform our common place practice towards nursing pedagogy. Ghanaian students displayed positive attitudes towards volunteering, although these did not translate into increased motivation to volunteer while at university. Students reported financial constraints as reasons for not volunteering as did UK students, although Ghanaian students used available resources for daily living expenses, whereas UK students prioritised available resources to pay down student debt. Structured volunteering was absent from both Ghanaian and UK nursing programmes, despite its potential to increase the variety of social groups or situations to which students are exposed, to increase self-confidence and to encourage greater reflection on practice through doing. Structural challenges within countries may provide a better explanation of variation in student motivation towards volunteering, than cross-cultural variation in attitudes towards volunteering between countries.
    • Contending with Spiritual Reductionism: Demons, Shame, and Dividualising Experiences Among Evangelical Christians with Mental Distress

      Lloyd, Christopher E. M.; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-05-15)
      The belief that mental distress is caused by demons, sin, or generational curses is commonplace among many evangelical Christian communities. These beliefs may have positive or negative effects for individuals and groups. Phenomenological descriptions of these experiences and the subjective meanings associated with them, however, remain somewhat neglected in the literature. The current study employed semi-structured interviews with eight evangelical Christians in order to idiographically explore their experiences of mental distress in relation to their faith and wider communities. Through an interpretative phenomenological analysis, two superordinate themes were constructed: negative spiritualisation and negotiating the dialectic between faith and the lived experience of mental distress. Participants variously experienced a climate of negative spiritualisation, whereby their mental distress was demonised and dismissed, and they were further discouraged from seeking help in secular institutions and environments. Participants often considered such dismissals of their mental distress as unhelpful and stigmatising and experienced heightened feelings of shame and suffering as a result. Such discouragement also contributed to the process of othering and relational disconnection. Alongside a rejection of church teachings, which exclusively spiritualised psychological distress, participants negotiated a nuanced personal synthesis of faith, theology, and distress, which assumed a localised and idiographic significance. This synthesis included advocating for the uptake of aetiological accounts, which contextualised mental distress in terms of the whole person and resisted de-politicised, dichotomised, and individualistic narratives. Results are discussed in relation to a broad range of literature in the field, while further research suggestions are provided.
    • LGBQ adults’ experiences of a CBT wellbeing group for anxiety and depression in an Improving Access to Psychological Therapies Service: a qualitative service evaluation

      Lloyd, Christopher E. M.; Rimes, Katharine A.; Hambrook, David G.; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2021-01-05)
      Sexual minorities, including those identifying as lesbian, gay, bisexual or queer (LGBQ) are at heightened risk of experiencing mental health problems. Nationally, treatment outcomes within England’s Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services are worse for sexual minority patients than for heterosexuals. An IAPT service in London developed a cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) group specifically for sexual minority patients to provide a safe, affirmative intervention to learn skills for overcoming depression, anxiety and stress. A qualitative online survey was emailed to all 59 service users who had completed the eight-session intervention, to explore their experiences inductively. Survey data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Themes were identified in participants’ responses in order to establish which aspects of the group intervention were deemed to be helpful and unhelpful, and to explore suggestions for group improvement. Eighteen people completed the survey (response rate 30.5%). Respondents reported that they found the CBT frame of the group useful, with the LGBQ focus experienced as particularly beneficial, often enhancing engagement with CBT concepts and tools. In addition to generic elements of group therapy that some found difficult, others reported that intragroup diversity, such as generational differences, could lead to a reduced sense of connection. Several suggestions for group improvement were made, including incorporating more diverse perspectives and examples in session content and focusing more on issues relating to intersectionality. These results provide preliminary evidence that a culturally adapted CBT group intervention developed specifically for sexual minorities is acceptable and perceived as offering something unique and helpful.
    • Access to Finance for Cleantech Innovation and Investment: Evidence from U.K. Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises

      Cowling, Marc; Weixi, Liu; University of Derby; University of Bath (IEEE, 2021-05-03)
      Clean technology (cleantech) is becoming increasingly important as firms and industries seek to address challenges around the global scarcity of resources and also achieve wider social and environmental goals. Yet there are underlying problems with how capital markets respond to this increasing demand for new and innovative cleantech investments. In this article, we use a large U.K. dataset to first consider the extent to which firms engaging with cleantech increase their demand for external capital. We then consider how different types of debt and equity financiers deal with this demand for funds. Our key findings are that: 1) businesses engaging with clean technologies have a higher demand for external capital and 2) these demands are not being fully met by traditional providers which forces firms to seek out alternative and nontraditional sources of finance.
    • Chasing a pot of gold: an analysis of emerging recovery-oriented addiction policies in Flanders (Belgium) and the Netherlands

      Bellaert, Lore; Martinelli, Thomas; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Best, David; van de Mheen, Dike; Vander Laenen, Freya; Ghent University; Tilberg University, The Netherlands; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-04-26)
      Following the paradigm shift to recovery in the Anglophone world, recovery is also gaining momentum in drug policy and practice in Flanders (Belgium) and the Netherlands. Since the meaning of recovery is being debated internationally, broadening the assessment of how the recovery framework is applied in policy discourse and how it is implemented in various international contexts is imperative. This com parative policy analysis aims to assess similarities and differences in addiction recovery vision, imple mentation, and evaluation in Flanders and the Netherlands. The thematic analysis draws upon a triangulation of different data collection methods: a focus group (n ¼ 14) and interviews (n ¼ 21) with key figures in the addictions field, followed by analyses of relevant policy documents (n ¼ 9). Our find ings show that a holistic vision of addiction recovery is endorsed in both countries. Although differen ces in policy development occurred (i.e. centrally driven in Flanders versus ‘bottom-up’ in the Netherlands), similar challenges emerged concerning recovery-oriented addiction policies. While policy makers in Flanders and the addiction sector in the Netherlands strongly proclaim recovery, structural implementation, dedicated funding, and systematic evaluation of recovery-oriented policies are lacking. This study suggests that systematic inclusion of experts by experience and aligning government and practice level funding and policies are crucial.
    • Justice capital: A model for reconciling structural and agentic determinants of desistance

      Best, David; Hamilton, Sharynne; Hall, Lauren; Bartels, Lorana; University of Derby; University of Western Australia; University of Lincoln; Australian National University (SAGE, 2021-04-08)
      The emerging literature on desistance (and recovery from addictions) has focused on key life-course transitions that can be characterised as the need for jobs (meaningful activities), friends (transitioning to pro-social) and houses (a home free from threat). The term ‘recovery capital’ is used to characterise personal, social and community resources an individual can draw upon to support their recovery, partly bridging agentic (per sonal) and structural (community) factors. The development of the concept of ‘justice capital’ furthers this reconciliation, by focusing on resources an individual can access and the resources that an institution can provide. We build on this by outlining the concept of institutional justice capital (IJC) to examine the role of criminal justice insti tutions in supporting or suppressing justice capital, particularly for marginalised groups. We use a case study approach, drawing on recent studies in prisons in Australia and the United Kingdom to develop a model of justice capital at an institutional level and discuss how this can shape reform of prisons and can be matched to the needs of offenders. The paper concludes with a discussion of future directions in implementing an IJC model, to deliver a strengths-based approach to promoting desistance and creating a metric for assessing the rehabilitative activities of institutions.
    • The Strengths and Barriers Recovery Scale (SABRS): Relationships matter in building strengths and overcoming barriers

      Best, David; Sondhi, Arun; Brown, Lorna; Nisic, Mulka; Martinelli, Thomas; van de Mheen, Dike; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; University of Derby; Therapeutic Solutions (Addictions), London; Recovered Users Network (RUN), Brussels, Belgium; et al. (Frontiers, 2021-03-26)
      There is a well-established relationship between isolation and both morbidity and mortality in the context of addiction recovery, yet the protective effects of intimate and familial relationships have not been adequately assessed. The current paper uses the European Life In Recovery database to assess the association between relationship status and living with dependent children on recovery capital of people in recovery from drug addiction, operationalised by the Strengths And Barriers Recovery Scale (SABRS). The study participants were drawn from the REC-PATH study and supplemented by a second sample recruited by the Recovered Users Network (RUN) across various European countries, resulting in a combined sample of 1,313 individuals completing the survey, primarily online. The results show that, in recovery, those who are married or co habiting reported significantly greater recovery strengths and fewer barriers to recovery, and reported greater gains in recovery capital across their recovery journeys. Similar associations are found for participants who have dependent children living with them. There is also some indication that this association is stronger for female than for male participants. Finally, having more people that one can rely on and a greater proportion of people in recovery in the social network are both linked to greater recovery capital and greater self-reported growth in recovery capital. We conclude that this study provides further evidence in favour of a “social cure” in recovery, in which close familial ties are associated with stronger recovery resources
    • Estimating a treatment effect on reoffending by people in prison with an alcohol use disorder: a national matched propensity score analysis

      Sondhi, Arun; Leidl, Alessandro; Best, David; Therapeutic Solutions (Addictions) London; Statistical Services Centre, Reading, UK; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-02-23)
      Little is known as to the efficacy of treatment interventions for an alcohol use disorder (AUD) to reduce reoffending. A quasi-experimental propensity score matched observational study was deployed to calculate the average treatment effect on reoffending for people in prison with an AUD exposed to prison-based treatment compared to a matched control group. A one-to-one match without replacement followed by a marginal Cox proportional hazards time-to-event model with the treatment group only were also run. No statistically signifi cant difference in reoffending rates and risk of reoffending on release were noted. Analyses suggest that the treatment group were more likely to be treated for binge drinking than individuals assessed who commit crime due to their consump tion of alcohol. The English treatment model is an opportunity to create an enhanced system that integrates public health whilst addressing recidivism. Further work is required assess ing the effect of multiple treatments on reoffending
    • Influence of Dance on Embodied Self-Awareness and Well-Being: An Interpretative Phenomenological Exploration

      Braun, Nataliya; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2021-05-13)
      This qualitative research aimed at exploring personal dance experience and influence of dancing on the evolution of embodied self-awareness and well-being. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with three participants (one female, two males), and the data were evaluated using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Six themes were identified: (a) freedom of expression through dance, (b) perceptions of fun and partner dance vs. dancing alone, (c) flow in dance, (d) sensations and sexuality in dance, (e) music and rhythm in dance, and (f) impact of dance on life and the self. Participants reported that dance led to higher embodied self-awareness and creative self-expression and was deemed to improve health and well-being. Our findings help increase the utility of dance as a well-being approach, stress coping intervention and countermeasure to depression and loneliness. They make aware of the use of dance as a creative tool in inducing positive transformations on individual and societal levels.
    • Performance evaluation of machine learning techniques for fault diagnosis in vehicle fleet tracking modules

      Sepulevene, Luis; Drummond, Isabela; Kuehne, Bruno Tardiole; Frinhani, Rafael; Filho, Dionisio Leite; Peixoto, Maycon; Reiff-Marganiec, Stephan; Batista, Bruno; Federal University of Itajubá, Itajubá, Brazil; Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Ponta Porã, Brazil; et al. (Oxford University Press, 2021-05-14)
      With industry 4.0, data-based approaches are in vogue. However, extracting the essential features is not a trivial task and greatly influences the fi nal result. There is also a need for specialized system knowledge to monitor the environment and diagnose faults. In this context, the diagnosis of faults is signi cant, for example, in a vehicle fleet monitoring system, since it is possible to diagnose faults even before the customer is aware of the fault, minimizing the maintenance costs of the modules. In this paper, several models using Machine Learning (ML) techniques were applied and analyzed during the fault diagnosis process in vehicle fleet tracking modules. Two approaches were proposed, "With Knowledge" and "Without Knowledge", to explore the dataset using ML techniques to generate classi fiers that can assist in the fault diagnosis process. The approach "With Knowledge" performs the feature extraction manually, using the ML techniques: Random Forest, Naive Bayes, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP); on the other hand, the approach "Without Knowledge" performs an automatic feature extraction, through a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). The results showed that the proposed approaches are promising. The best models with manual feature extraction obtained a precision of 99.76% and 99.68% for detection and detection and isolation of faults, respectively, in the provided dataset. The best models performing an automatic feature extraction obtained respectively 88.43% and 54.98% for detection and detection and isolation of failures.
    • Opinions of small and medium UK construction companies on environmental management systems

      Bailey, Matthew; Booth, Colin A; Horry, Rosemary; Vidalakis, Christos; Mahamadu, Abdul-Majeed; Awuah, Kwasi Gyau Baffour; University of Derby; University of the West of England; University of Salford (Thomas Telford Ltd, 2021-02-16)
      Pressure to reduce the environmental impact of construction activities has increased, such that a paradigm shift is required. This paper presents stakeholder opinions of environmental management systems as a means for the construction industry to respond to these issues. Using a previous approach, the views of small and medium construction companies were sought, using questionnaires to ask respondents to reveal their perceived benefits of and barriers to implementing the ISO 14000 suite of environmental management standards in the UK. Detailed statistical analysis showed that environmental management systems can sometimes produce quantifiable benefits to organisations in terms of cost reduction. However, from a contractor’s view, the greatest benefit was a reduction in environmental impact outweighing financial benefits. Findings also demonstrated numerous barriers to an organisation exist, both internal and external, regarding adoption and use of environmental management systems. The most critical barrier was that cost savings do not always balance with the expense of implementation. Furthermore, waste minimisation at the design stage is viewed as most important. In general, the opinions gauged in this study indicated that short-term profits are normally considered more imperative than long-term gains. Therefore, despite a need to focus on developing strategies for removing or reducing the challenges of environmental management systems, the reality is that they may not be the panacea to sustainable development, as is often touted.
    • Holidays and economic growth: Evidence from a panel of Indian states

      Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan; Apergis, Nicholas; University of Derby; University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA (Wiley, 2021-05-01)
      The number of holidays differs significantly across Indian states. Moreover, some of the governing political parties have been accused of using holidays as a tool either to mollify disgruntled workers or to woo voters before the state elections. In this context, this paper explores the relationship between the number of holidays and economic growth across 24 Indian states, spanning the period 2008–2016, by employing a panel model analysis. The paper presents evidence suggesting that holidays seem to affect growth negatively in the rich states but are inconsequential for the growth performance of the poor states.
    • Times they are a changing: evaluating interventions in a new era

      Astley, Jo; Church, Emma; University of Derby; East Midlands Widening Participation Research and Evaluation Partnership (FACE, 2021-03-24)
      This chapter will outline the University of Derby’s response to that APP requirement of evidence-based practice to address the inequitable HE outcomes of under-represented groups. It will firstly share the University’s current evaluation practices concerning access, in which the East Midlands Widening Participation Research and Evaluation Partnership (EMWPREP) plays such a key role. It will then move on to demonstrate how the University has utilised Theory of Change to embed evidence-based practice across the whole student lifecycle, and discuss the methods and methodologies that will be adopted within a new framework to evaluate interventions, and identify new areas for research. The chapter concludes by reflecting on key areas of focus required by the University through the 2019-2020 academic year, in order for the institution to be well equipped to meet its APP reporting requirements when the first monitoring return is due in spring 2022. It will also reflect on the challenges that the institution faces (as well as the sector as a whole), in order to fulfil OfS expectations.
    • Researching entrepreneurship: an approach to develop subjective understanding

      Rajasinghe, Duminda; Aluthgama-Baduge, Chinthaka; Mulholland, Gary; University of Northampton, Northampton, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK; AFG College with University of Aberdeen, Doha, Qatar (Emerald, 2021-04-29)
      Entrepreneurship is a complex social activity. Hence, knowledge production in the field requires inclusivity and diversity within research approaches and perspectives to appreciate the richness of the phenomenon. However, the dominance of positivist research in the field is visible, and the current qualitative research is also predominantly restricted to popular templates. This seems to have limited the understanding of entrepreneurship. This paper critically discusses the appropriateness of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) as an innovative qualitative research methodology that facilitates a fuller appreciation of the richness and diversity of entrepreneurship. This conceptual paper critically evaluates IPA's relevance for the stated purpose by reviewing both entrepreneurship and IPA literature. It discusses how IPA's philosophical underpinnings facilitate scholars to appreciate the wholeness of the phenomenon and provides literature informed data analysis guidance, thereby addressing some of the weaknesses of the qualitative research within the field. Critical evaluation of the literature suggests that IPA is an appropriate research methodology for entrepreneurship. It has the potential to address some interesting and timely questions to elaborate, deepen and qualify existing theory or to study relatively unexplored areas within the field. The laid-out guidance helps scholars to develop informed rationale for their research decisions and to ensure quality and rigour in qualitative research. This paper promotes the analysis of how people make sense of their experience as a valid way of knowing. IPA has a unique identity as it incorporates phenomenology, hermeneutics and idiography as a way to explore first-hand human experience to uncover qualitative understanding of entrepreneurship. The clear guidance and justifications in the paper promote scholarly confidence and address some preconceptions related to rigour, quality and validity of qualitative studies. Incorporating IPA into entrepreneurship, the paper also contributes to the demand for diversity, inclusivity and pluralism in qualitative research perspectives and approaches.
    • A readiness self-assessment model for implementing Green Lean Initiatives

      Cherrafi, Anass; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Belhadi, Amine; Kamble, S.S; Elbaz, Jamal; Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, Morocco; University of Derby; Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco; EDHEC Business School, Roubaix, 59057, France; ENCG –Agadir, Ibn Zohr University, Agadir, Morocco (Elsevier, 2021-05-07)
      This paper proposes a self-assessment model to evaluate the level of readiness of organizations to implement Green Lean initiatives. A systematic literature review was conducted to synthesize the key elements of the implementation of Green Lean, barriers and its critical success factors. The proposed instrument was validated through semi-structured interviews and workshops with experts from academia and industry and applied in four manufacturing companies in a developing country. The results revealed that the proposed self-assessment model is an appropriate instrument to determine the readiness of organizations for effectively implementing Green Lean. The proposed self-assessment model was able to display the potential challenges a company will face if it aims to integrate Green and Lean and implement it. The results of this paper will help the practitioners to conduct a diagnostic of requirements for Green Lean adoption, thereby increasing the probability of success of such an initiative before a company spends its resources on the project. Consequently, this paper will contribute to encouraging the effective implementation of Green Lean initiatives and serving as implications for further exploration and contribution to this area.
    • Educators Perspectives on the Value of Physical Education, Physical Activity and Fundamental Movement Skills for Early Years Foundation Stage Children in England.

      Dobell, Alexandra; Pringle, Andy; Faghy, Mark A; Roscoe, Clare M P; University of Derby (MDPI, 2021-04-26)
      There is a lack of information available for physical education (PE) provision in the early years foundation stage (EYFS), prompting concern about what is currently delivered in schools and the values behind the approaches taken. Using semi-structured interviews, this study investigated educators’ perspectives on the value of PE and physical activity (PA) for EYFS children across England in relation to opportunities for, barriers to, and benefits of PA and PE. This study collected important stakeholder views and can help shape the impact and implementation of fundamental movement skills (FMS) and PA interventions at the EYFS.
    • Training careers professionals: Underpinning research for the C-Course programme.

      Hooley, Tristram; Schulstok, Torild; University of Derby; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (Inland Norway University of Applied Science, 2021)
      This report sets out the findings of research conducted in the Czech Republic, Norway, Slovakia and Poland to underpin the development of a new professional e-learning programme for careers practitioners. The recommendations are based on a review of the literature, desk research in each of the countries, expert interviews and practitioner focus groups. Overall, the research finds that: 1. there is a clear demand for an e-learning course for careers practitioners across the four countries. The e-learning should: 2. be clearly articulated in a way that clarifies who should engage with it and why; 3. be flexible to ensure that a wide range of practitioners can access and benefit from it; 4. include interaction with others and foster a community of practice; and 5. make use of a range of technologies by using multi-media and interactive tools. In terms of content, the training should include: 6. clarification of the key terminology and definitions with the field; 7. an overview different approaches to delivering careers services; 8. how to work with a range of different sectors and different client groups; 9. how to work more systemically e.g. with families, communities and organisations; 10. knowledge about the education system, labour market and the research skills required to gather this information for yourself; 11. support for those who are undergoing the training to become professionals and adopt healthy, ethical, reflective, and context-aware practice; and 12. an overview of key theories and evidence for more advanced practitioners.
    • “Upskirting,” Homosociality, and Craftmanship: A Thematic Analysis of Perpetrator and Viewer Interactions

      Hall, Matthew; Hearn, Jeff; Lewis, Ruth; Arden University; British University in Egypt; University of Derby; University of Huddersfield; Örebro University; Hanken School of Economics; Northumbria University (Sage, 2021-05-05)
      “Upskirting” is the action or practice of surreptitiously taking photographs or videos up a female’s skirt or dress. In the United Kingdom, it is an offense. However, internationally, laws are uneven. Understanding how perpetrators account for their actions becomes an important question. Here, we present the findings of our thematic analysis of posts on the “upskirting” website, The Candid Zone. Our analysis shows that posters and respondents frame this activity as artistic and technical, providing each other with advice and guidance on where and how to get the “best” shots. We conceptualize this form of abuse as homosociality and craftsmanship.