Now showing items 1-20 of 6061

    • Physical activity: understanding and addressing inequalities

      Jackson, Jessica; Roscoe, Clare M. P.; Mourton, Niamh; University of Derby (Public Health England, 2021-02-22)
      This guidance can be used by local level practitioners and commissioners to begin tackling inequalities in physical activity across and within protected characteristic groups. It presents the findings of a review, analysis and research aimed at understanding the enablers, barriers and opportunities for increasing physical activity across inequality groups. Three major themes are identified as considerations for action by practitioners and commissioners: enablers, barriers, and identifying opportunity community consultation, engagement, and partnership adopting a holistic approach for protected characteristics and intersectionality The document concludes with a full set of recommendations for commissioners and practitioners to consider when designing services and interventions locally.
    • An evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of good career guidance

      Hanson, Jill; Moore, Nicki; Neary, Siobhan; Clark, Lewis; University of Debry (University of Derby, 2021-03-01)
      This report presents the findings of a four year (2016-2019) formative and summative evaluation of the North East of England pilot of the Gatsby Benchmarks of Good Career Guidance. It uses quantitative and qualitative data collected from school and college staff, learners and stakeholders, as well as Gatsby Benchmark self-audit data, financial data and data pertaining to learner attendance, attainment and destinations. It describes the progress made by the sixteen pilot education providers in achieving the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, explores the approaches they took to achieving the Benchmarks and considers the barriers and enablers they faced. The impacts of their work in delivering the Gatsby Benchmarks on learners, staff, local stakeholders and national policy and practice are presented. The findings indicate that significant progress in achieving all eight Benchmarks can be made by all kinds of education providers within two years and that this has a significant and observable effect on learners with respect to their career readiness, their interactions with teaching staff and employers, their engagement in the classroom and on attainment.
    • The online and campus (OaC) model as a sustainable blended approach to teaching and learning in higher education: A response to COVID-19

      Petronzi, Rebecca; Petronzi, Dominic; University of Derby (Journal of Pedagogical Research, Turkey, 2020-11-10)
      The COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented challenge for wider society and has impacted all facets of life, including Higher Education Institution (HEIs) provision for teaching and learning – demanding an immediate digital response. The core challenge lies with the inherent choice made by students upon embarking on an undergraduate degree; that face-to-face learning was their preference. Now, HEIs must address this by utilising a range of digital solutions – that crucially, must also be embraced by those that no longer have the luxury to be risk averse or believe that digital solutions align with their existing pedagogical approaches. Higher Education Institutions should be – to an extent – well placed to deliver online provision. This paper aims to explore pertinent literature surrounding blended approaches with regards to key pedagogical and learning theories, with an overall aim of suggesting the Online and Campus (OaC) model as a potential ‘blueprint’ that incorporates campus, synchronous and asynchronous learning experiences. We refer to asynchronous as flexible, self-paced learning, and synchronous as an environment in which learners are in the same place at a given time (either online or campus) and accessing the same materials. For the purposes of this paper – and the OaC model – both asynchronous and synchronous learning refers to online provision, and we make the distinction between face-to-face teaching by reference to ‘Campus’.
    • Weaving together: narratives of home, exile and belonging

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Bloomsbury, 2021-05-20)
      Art, Borders and Belonging: On Home and Migration investigates how three associated concepts-house, home and homeland-are represented in contemporary global art. The volume brings together essays which explore the conditions of global migration as a process that is always both about departures and homecomings, indeed, home-makings, through which the construction of migratory narratives are made possible. Although centrally concerned with how recent and contemporary works of art can materialize the migratory experience of movement and (re)settlement, the contributions to this book also explore how curating and exhibition practices, at both local and global levels, can extend and challenge conventional narratives of art, borders and belonging. A growing number of artists migrate; some for better job opportunities and for the experience of different cultures, others not by choice but as a consequence of forced displacement caused economic or environmental collapse, or by political, religious or military destabilization. In recent years, the theme of migration has emerged as a dominant subject in art and curatorial practices. Art, Borders and Belonging thus seeks to explore how the migratory experience is generated and displayed through the lens of contemporary art. In considering the extent to which the visual arts are intertwined with real life events, this text acts as a vehicle of knowledge transfer of cultural perspectives and enhances the importance of understanding artistic interventions in relation to home, migration and belonging.
    • National identity and the politics of belonging in Greek Cypriot visual culture

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Springer, 2021-04-12)
      For decades the display of blue and white colours in Cyprus have been synonymous with Greek nationalism. During British colonial rule in Cyprus, there was a rise of nationalism. As a result, the Greek population of Cyprus demanded Enosis (union) with Greece. The rise of Greek nationalism during the National Liberation Struggle 1955-59 was, for the most part, denoted through a national ‘spectacle’ that included the national anthem and the flag. According to Rebecca Bryant (2004: 164), ‘anything which bore the blue and white colors of Greece […] could be constructed as symbolic of Greek nationalism’. This chapter investigates the visual representation of Greek flags and the way images convey nationalism in Cyprus. It focuses on the work of Greek Cypriot artists Takis Frangoudes and George Georgiou, who both employed visual strategies to expose historical and socio-political events in Cyprus. It will explore how the usage of ‘national spectacles’ represented the political events during the anti-colonial struggle. It will also examine how the usage of the blue and white colours of the Greek flag constructs a sense of collective and political belonging during the long and violent history of Cyprus.
    • The feasibility and tolerability of using inspiratory muscle training with adults discharged from the hospital with community-acquired pneumonia

      Pick, H.J.; Faghy, Mark; Creswell, G; Ashton, D; Bolton, C.E.; McKeever, T; Shen Lim, W; Bewick, T; Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust; University of Derby; et al. (Via Medica, 2021-02-17)
      Patients experience substantial morbidity following discharge from hospital and during recovery from communi-ty-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has demonstrated improved functional capacity and reduced patient-reported symptoms. To date the safety and tolerability of these methods have not been determined in CAP patients recovering following hospitalization. Accordingly, this study aimed to assess the safety and tolerability of IMT in adults discharged from hospital with CAP. Participants received an IMT device (POWERbreathe KHP2) and completed 9-weeks IMT training with weekly follow-up. Frequency (twice daily) and load (50% PImax) were fixed throughout, but training volume increased incre-mentally (2-week habituation phase, 7-week training phase). Primary outcomes of interest included IMT safety and tolerability. Twenty-two participants were recruited; 16 were male, mean age 55.2 years (range 27.9–77.3). From 1183 possible training days, side effects were reported on 15 occasions by 10 individual participants. All reported side-effects were assessed as grade 1 and did not prevent further training. Participant-reported IMT acceptability was 99.4%. Inspiratory muscle training is safe and tolerable in patients following hospitalisation for CAP. Patient satisfaction with IMT is high and it is viewed by patients as being helpful in their recovery. Distinguishing CAP-related symptoms and device-related side effects is challenging. Symptom prevalence declined during follow-up with concurrent improvements in spirometry observed. Further research is required to determine the efficacy of IMT interventions following CAP and other acute respiratory infections.
    • Mental health of medical workers in Japan during COVID-19: relationships with loneliness, hope and self-compassion

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Ozaki, Akihiko; Miyatake, Hirotomo; Tsunetoshi, Chie; Nishikawa, Yoshitaka; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; University of Derby; Jyoban Hospital of Tokiwa Foundation, Iwaki, Fukushima, Japan; Medical Governance Research Institute, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Orange Home Care Clinic, Tawara, Fukui, Japan; et al. (Springer, 2021-02-20)
      The current pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has negatively impacted medical workers’ mental health in many countries including Japan. Although research identified poor mental health of medical workers in COVID-19, protective factors for their mental health remain to be appraised. Accordingly, this study aimed to investigate relationships between mental health problems, loneliness, hope and self-compassion among Japanese medical workers, and compare with the general population. Online self-report measures regarding those four constructs were completed by 142 medical workers and 138 individuals in the general population. T-tests and multiple regression analysis were performed. Medical workers had higher levels of mental health problems and loneliness, and lower levels of hope and self-compassion than the general population. Loneliness was the strongest predictor of mental health problems in the medical workers. Findings suggest that Japanese medical workplaces may benefit from targeting workplace loneliness to prevent mental health problems among the medical staff.
    • The 21st Century HE Careers Professional

      Thambar, Nalayini; Neary, Siobhan; Zlatic, Franka; University of Nottingham; University of Derby (Higher Education Careers Service Unit, 2021-02-17)
      The role of HE careers services have been increasingly influenced over the last ten years or so. The research aimed to explore how various drivers, metrics such as the National Student Survey (NSS), Destinations of Leavers of Higher Education (DLHE), Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) and the introduction of higher fees have impacted practitioners and their services over the last decade. The methodology adopted a qualitative approach including, a focus group, an online survey and in-depth interviews with a sample of services representing Pre and Post 92, Russell Group and Specialist HE. Throughout the course of the research, the COVID-19 Pandemic erupted which impacted on the nature of the research project. The research identified that Careers Professionals defined their role as providing support to students in their career development and planning, including the navigation of recruitment processes. They achieve this through working directly with the students on a 1:1 basis, recognising the resource-intensity yet value of this approach, and also through the delivery of workshop activity. Alongside this, the role typically involves increased and increasing activity to embed careers education within, or to align with, the curriculum. Institutional interest in employability and resulting structures means that a growing number of careers professionals’ roles are based in a Faculty or another part of their institution such as a Graduate School, in some cases being employed directly by them rather than the Careers Service itself. This decentralization was often linked to supporting departments in achieving higher NSS and other employability related metrics.
    • The cradle to gate life-cycle assessment of thermoelectric materials: A comparison of inorganic, organic and hybrid types

      Soleimani, Zohreh; Zoras, Stamatis; Ceranic, Boris; Shahzad, Sally; Cui, Yuanlong; University of Derby; Sheffield University (Elsevier, 2021-02-18)
      Using thermoelectric generators to convert waste heat into electricity is a renewable alternative to fossil energy sources. As thermoelectric materials are the main element of thermoelectric generators, so far numerous studies have attempted to optimize their energy conversion efficiency. However, no single study to date has examined their life cycle impacts, whilst it is the most important feature of any renewable technology. Accordingly, the aim of the present study is to assess the life cycle impacts of thermoelectric materials at their production stage (cradle to gate) using a life cycle assessment tool called GaBi v.4.4. Thus, the thermoelectric materials were categorized into inorganic, organic, and hybrid types. The five investigated impact categories were resource consumption, emission, waste, primary energy demand, and global warming potential. The results confirmed that the inorganic type caused significantly greater environmental impacts than the other two types. The only inorganic exception was Bi 2 Te 3 that its environmental impact was by far the lowest among all the studied thermoelectric materials. Notably, the inorganic type caused major harm to the environment due to its extremely energy-intensive manufacturing process. However, the core environmental drawback of the organic and hybrid types was driven from their raw materials supply.
    • Corporate social responsibility in the oil and gas industry in Nigeria: the case for a legalised framework

      Ekhator, Eghosa; Iyiola-Omisore, Ibukun; University of Derby; University of Leeds (Springer, 2021-01-26)
      This chapter focuses on the extant corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices in the oil and gas industry in Nigeria. The oil and gas industry has been beset by a lot of problems not limited to violence, kidnappings, eco-terrorism, and maladministration amongst others. One of the strategies of curing or mitigating these inherent problems in the oil and gas sector is the use of CSR initiatives by many oil multinational corporations (MNCs) operating in Nigeria. Notwithstanding that the majority of CSR initiatives in the oil and gas sector in Nigeria are voluntary, this chapter avers that CSR initiatives should be made mandatory by the Nigerian government. Furthermore, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) should play an integral role in the implementation of any legalised framework on CSR that will be developed in the country. This chapter suggests that a CSR law should be developed specifically for the oil and gas industry to mitigate the negative externalities arising from the activities of oil MNCs in the Niger Delta region of the country
    • Seismic signature of mudflow tremor resulted from Brumadinho (Brazil) tailings dam failure

      Hussain, Yawar; Hamza, Omar; Huang, Xinghui; Silva, André Carlos; Condori, Cristobal; Uagoda, Rogério; Cavalcante, André Luís Brasil; University of Derby; University of Liège; University of Brasília; et al. (Fundação Gorceix, Brazil, 2020-06-22)
      Mudflow is often associated with seismic activities. The present study applied a seismic based detection of the surface waves generated by the mudflow of Brumadinho dam collapse using records of Brazilian Seismographic Network. The signal envelope and time-frequency spectrograms of the mudflow signals were used in the analysis. As a result, the mudflow signals were successfully detected from the data recorded at a nearby seismic station. The findings of this study provide a good basis for future research to develop a flood early warning system based on cost-effective, remote and contentious seismic monitoring approaches.
    • Desistance: A utopian perspective

      Patton, David; Farrall, Stephen; University of Derby (Wiley, 2021-02-22)
      The written diaries of forty-three adult male respondents from a prison sample that had participated in a restorative justice intervention reveal a nuanced and dynamic process of desistance via their hopes and pains of anticipated desistance at the micro, meso and macro level. A utopian reading of the respondents’ hopes and pains of desistance is developed which reveal that their diaries express a utopian vision that is not just personal, but also inherently political, radical, collective and transformative. Their pains of desistance on the other hand, reveal a critique and condemnation of the current societal and structural apparatus. The necessity for radical and collective change is clear, if desisters and society are to reach their full potential.
    • HUMANIZING HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT TO IMPROVE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF RESILIENT HOSPITABLE TALENTS IN THE SECTOR.

      Rawlinson, Sarah; Naisola Ruiter, Victoria (University of Derby, 2021-02-15)
      Attracting, retaining, developing, and motivating hospitable talent is a perennial problem in hospitality industry talent management. This thesis sought to address this problem by examining how human resource (HR) practices can improve talent management (TM) to attract persons with the right personal characteristics and support them to thrive in a hospitality career. There has been a shift in the academic literature from a focus on the organisational practices of talent management to understanding the implications of the employee’s experience as they develop within an organisation. There remains much to be understood about the role of human resources management (HRM) practitioners in the attraction and retention of talents with the right personal attributes to succeed in hospitality careers. This thesis aims to advance the theoretical understanding of HR theories and strategies to improve recruitment and retention in the hospitality industry. To meet the aim of this research, a mixed method approach and a sequential data collection approach was adopted. A personality self-profiling questionnaire survey was used to profile 309 students from business management degree programmes on their hospitable personal characteristics to understand whether students selecting hospitality management degrees had more hospitable characteristics. A Delphi study was conducted with 14 hospitality experts with different national and international hospitality leadership and management experience. The study aimed to research consensus on the strategic HR approaches required to improve recruitment and retention in the hospitality industry. The main findings of the research study were the need to review HR strategies in the hospitality industry. These strategies need to address recruitment and retention by promoting careers in the sector, investing in training and development, rewards and wellbeing strategies appropriate for a younger work force, closer working with training institutions to develop graduate competencies that are multi-disciplinary HRM practices and policies that humanize HRM throughout the employee journey. This study makes an important contribution to understanding the role of humane HRM strategies in recruitment and retention of a skilled and resilient hospitality workforce. One of the outcomes of this study is the development of a theoretically supported and empirically validated strategic HRM recruitment and retention toolkit. The toolkit is an end-to-end process that operationalizes and maps the HRM strategies throughout the employee experience journey to facilitate HR managers to improve the process of recruitment and retention in the sector. It identifies empirically found strategies and reveals possibilities to integrate an end-to-end strategic approach in talent management prioritizing employee wellbeing, training and development to nurture employee emotional resilience. This is the first research study to illuminate an end-to-end strategic approach towards an employee journey in the hospitality industry. To identify the scope of research to be explored in the future, implications for future research and practice are outlined.
    • Antecedents and outcomes of resident empowerment through tourism

      Aleshinloye, Kayode; Woosnam, Kyle; Tasci, Asli; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; University of Central Florida; University of Georiga, Athens, Greece; University of Derby (SAGE, 2021-02-17)
      Even though empowerment is a frequently mentioned keyword in resident attitude studies, the relationship network of this concept is rather vague. It is critical to understand the factors that influence empowerment, and factors that empowerment influences in return. Therefore, the current study modeled residents’ data from the top tourism destination in the U.S.—Orlando, Florida. Data from 415 residents were analyzed using Partial Least Squares - Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) on SmartPLS to test the effects of residents’ involvement and economic benefits from tourism on their psychological, social and political empowerment, and thus quality of life and ultimately, place attachment. Findings revealed that psychological empowerment is the most significant dimension of resident empowerment influencing both place dependence and place identity, suggesting that residents hold special values for their place. Managerial and theoretical implications, along with limitations (in light of the project occurring pre-COVID-19) and future research opportunities are discussed. Keywords: Resident attitudes, empowerment, place attachment, quality of life, PLS
    • A Novel Mathematical Layout Optimisation Method and Design Framework for Modularisation in Industrial Process Plants and SMRs

      Wood, Paul; Hall, Richard; Robertson, Daniel; Wrigley, Paul (University of DerbyInstitute for Innovation in Sustainable EngineeringUniversity of Derby, 2021-01-19)
      Nuclear power has been proposed as a low carbon solution to electricity generation when intermittent wind and solar renewable energy are not generating. Nuclear can provide co-generation through district heating, desalination, hydrogen production or aid in the process of producing synfuels. However, current new large nuclear power plants are expensive, time consuming to build and plagued by delays and cost increases. An emerging trend in the construction industry is to manufacture parts off the critical path, off site in factories, through modular design to reduce schedules and direct costs. A study from shipbuilding estimates work done in a factory may be 8 times more efficient than performing the same work on site. This productivity increase could be a solution to the problems in nuclear power plant construction. It is an emerging area and the International Atomic Energy Agency records over 50 Small Modular Reactor designs in commercial development worldwide. Most Small Modular Reactor designs focus on integrating the Nuclear Steam Supply System into one module. The aim of this Applied Research Programme was to develop an efficient and effective analysis tool for modularisation in industrial plant systems. The objectives were to understand the state of the art in modular construction and automating design through a literature review. The literature review in this thesis highlighted that automating earlier parts of the plant design process (equipment databases, selection tools and modular Process and Instrumentation Diagrams) have been developed in modular industrial process plant research but 3D layout has not been studied. It was also found that layout optimisation for industrial process plants has not considered modularisation. It was therefore proposed to develop a novel mathematical layout optimisation method for modularisation of industrial plants. Furthermore, the integration within the plant design process would be improved by developing a method to integrate the output of the optimisation with the plant design software. A case study was developed to analyse how this new method would compare against the current design process at Rolls-Royce. A systems engineering approach was taken to develop the capabilities of the optimisation by decomposing the three required constituents of modularisation: development of a model to optimise layout of modules utilising the module designs from previous research (Lapp, 1989), development of a model to optimise the layout equipment within modules and development of a combined and integrated model to optimise assignment and layout of equipment to modules. The objective function was to reduce pipe length as it can constitute up to 20% of process plant costs (Peters, Timmerhaus, & West, 2003) and to reduce the number of modules utilised. The results from the mathematical model were compared against previous layout designs (Lapp, 1989), highlighting a 46-88.7% reduction in pipework and considering pipework costs can be up to 20% of a process plant cost, this could be a significant saving. This does not consider the significant schedule and productivity savings by moving this work offsite. The second model (Bi) analysed the layout of the Chemical Volume and Control System and Boron Thermal Regeneration System into one and two modules, reducing pipe cost and installation by 67.6% and 85% respectively compared to the previously designed systems from (Lapp, 1989). The third model (Bii) considered the allocation of equipment to multiple modules, reducing pipe cost and installation by 80.5% compared to the previously designed systems from (Lapp, 1989), creating new data and knowledge. Mixed Integer Linear Programming formulations and soft constraints within the genetic algorithm function were utilised within MATLAB and Gurobi. Furthermore, by integrating the optimisation output with the plant design software to update the new locations of equipment and concept pipe routing, efficiency is vastly improved when the plant design engineer interprets the optimisation results. Not only can the mathematical layout optimisation analyse millions more possible layouts than an engineering designer, it can perform the function in a fraction of the time, saving time and costs. It at least gives the design engineer a suitable starting point which can be analysed and the optimisation model updated in an iterative process. This novel method was compared against the current design process at Rolls-Royce, it was found that an update to a module would take minutes with the novel optimisation and integration with the plant design software method, rather than days or weeks for the manual process. However, the disadvantage is that more upfront work is required to convert engineering knowledge into mathematical terms and relationships. The research is limited by the publicly available nuclear power plant data. Future work could include applying this novel method to wider industrial plant design to understand the broader impact. The mathematical optimisation model can be developed in the future to include constraints in other research such as assembly, operation and maintenance costs.
    • Our School Days: A Narrative Inquiry of the Lived Experiences of Former Pupils in Derbyshire Primary Schools from 1944 to 2009

      Tupling, Claire; Charles, Sarah; Shelton, Fiona (University of Derby, 2021-01-25)
      The aim of this study was to explore narratives of former pupils, who attended primary school between 1944 and 2009, to understand educational change and the everyday experience of educational policy. By exploring education through a lens of experience, the study adopted narrative inquiry as a method to awaken hidden stories of the ordinary, everyday experiences of the participants (narrators) to gain insight into their memories of primary school. Drawn together, these individual experiences form a ‘collected memory’ which provides insight into primary education across the different decades. The findings demonstrate how narrative inquiry offers insight into primary school experiences by examining stories as data sources, which bring to bear the experience of school from the perspective of former pupils. The stories, combined with an examination of literature and legislation, highlight how and why teachers are remembered, the curriculum, educational inequity, memories of playground games and books read at school. An implication for teacher educators is to include the understanding of experience and the impact that teaching methods and policy implementation can have in later life. Significantly, it is the stories themselves which bring to bear the experience of policy as recalled by the narrators and highlights the narrator-researcher relationship in awakening and interpreting the stories, demonstrating the value of story as a method for understanding education. Examination of the literature surfaces the rise of neoliberal ideology in education and the impact of this on children’s learning experiences. In addition, the government’s promulgation of the feminisation of the primary school, constructed through the government’s casting of women in the primary phase is observed. Education makes claims about inclusion, equality, access and social justice, it is hailed as the leveller for a more just and equal society, the stories elicited in this research demonstrate that the many facets of the education system are complicit in the notion of power (James, 2015). Therefore, those in positions of educational and political power in our society should not be generators of prevailing inequalities of policy but seek to identify and remove barriers to raise standards for all. The recommendations call for a repositioning of teachers as experts, and not merely ‘deliverers’ of policy and curriculum context. The performativity agenda of testing and inspections drives behaviours in schools, which are neither allied to the ethos of many teachers, nor to their pedagogical and subject expertise, therefore political and legislative change is required for teachers to be able to reassert themselves, to reclaim their authority and to lobby for greater democracy within the school system, particularly in relation to policy and curriculum development. Raising the profile of teachers and pupils as stakeholders is critical so that all stakes are equally valued and understood. An original contribution of this research demonstrates the value of story in gaining insights into how policy was experienced by the narrators and from which lessons can be learned. Thus, through application of narrative inquiry, it can be argued that story is a powerful method of understanding the experience of policy as remembered by former pupils. The concept of awakening, in bringing the story to bear, is key in this research, expanding Clandinin and Connelly’s (2000) notion of wakefulness. This was evident in the co-production of stories and the artefacts that were presented through the opening of narrative spaces in the interview process to awaken the story. This study therefore makes an original contribution, by using narrative inquiry as a methodological basis for awakening stories from the past, to understand the experience of educational policy set against the lived experience of the narrators over six decades of primary school education.
    • Prescribed $k$-symmetric curvature hypersurfaces in de Sitter space

      Ballesteros-Chávez, Daniel; Klingenberg, Wilhelm; Lambert, Ben; Silesian University of Technology, Kaszubska; University of Durham; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press, 2020-11-26)
      We prove existence of compact spacelike hypersurfaces with prescribed k - curvature in de Sitter space, where the prescription function depends on both space and the tilt function.
    • The needs of clients coming to counselling following an experience of second harm: A Q Methodology study

      Whiffin, Charlotte; Townend, Michael; Kenward, Linda (University of DerbyUniversity of Cumbria, 2021-02)
      Introduction Successive reports identified that psychological harm (second harm) can be caused to patients by poor responses of healthcare providers to initial errors or neglect. Aim To explore the needs of clients coming to counselling following experience of second harm. Method A Q methodology study involving ten participants UK wide was undertaken. Participants sorted 42 statements online constructed from a concourse comprising sources on experiences of second harm. Concourse sources focused on the deficits of interpersonal relationships, therefore statements focused on what participants needed from interpersonal relationships with counsellors moving towards recovery. Data analysis Factor Analysis via PQMethod was undertaken on the Q sort data. The interview data was used to elucidate the nuances of the Factors as viewpoints. Findings Two Factors were extracted from the Q sort data that demonstrated the viewpoints of participants: Viewpoint 1 – Needs that are both past and present focused: being understood. Viewpoint 2 – Needs that are both present and recovery focused: making me well. From these two viewpoints 11 perceived needs were identified. Nine were identified as generic needs within the counselling relationship; however, two were identified as specific to those attending counselling for second harm. Counselling needs specific to second harm were; the need for participants to not be blamed for what happened and, the need to have the counsellor understand the impact of the harm and the complaints and litigation system including issues of control, power, and autonomy. Conclusion Findings of this study revealed people who seek counselling following experiences of second harm have specific needs beyond those expected from a general counselling relationship. Furthermore this study was able to define second harm for the first time and offers this to the research and practice community in the hope it will advance the field by helping counsellors to understand the concept, nature, and impact of second harm in addition to the expected skill set for any counsellor supporting those who have experienced second harm. Further research is required to evaluate the impact of educating counsellors in second harm and further testing of the definition of second harm.
    • An initiative for student nurses to practise clinical skills at home

      Whitehead, Bill; Ansell, Helen; University of Derby (EMAP, 2021-02-15)
      This article describes an initiative for students to practise clinical skills in their own homes using university-supplied instructions and equipment, implemented as a response to the restrictions to on-campus teaching during the coronavirus pandemic. It includes recommendations for future use, concluding that it would also be a useful adjunct to traditional training methods following the end of the pandemic.
    • Predicting self-compassion in UK nursing students: Relationships with resilience, engagement, motivation, and mental wellbeing

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Cockerill, Vicky; Chircop, James; Kaluzeviciute, Greta; Dyson, Sue; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2021-02-11)
      Self-compassion, being kind towards oneself, has been identified as a key protective factor of mental health. This is consistent with students’ experiences in the study of nursing, which attracts a large number of students in the United Kingdom. Despite the importance of self-compassion, knowledge in how to enhance self-compassion is under-researched. Self-compassion interventions are commonly related to meditative exercises. In order to suggest alternative approaches, relationships between self-compassion and more established constructs need to be appraised. Accordingly, this study evaluated predictors of self-compassion, examining its relationships with more established constructs examined in other healthcare student populations: resilience, engagement, motivation and mental wellbeing. An opportunity sample of 182 UK nursing students at a university in East Midlands completed self-report measures about these constructs. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted. Self-compassion was positively related to resilience, engagement, intrinsic motivation and mental wellbeing, while negatively related to amotivation. Resilience and mental wellbeing were identified as significant predictors of self-compassion. As resilience and mental wellbeing are relatively familiar to many nursing lecturers and students, educators can incorporate a self-compassion component into the existing resilience training and/or mental wellbeing practices.