Now showing items 1-20 of 6463

    • Innovative and Sustainable Food Production and Food Consumption Entrepreneurship: A Conceptual Recipe for Delivering Development Success in South Africa

      Samkange, Faith; Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Chipumuro, Juiliet; Wanyama, Henry; Chawla, Gaurav; University of Derby; University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; Stenden University, Saint Alfred 1142, South Africa; Tshama Green Consultants, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa; University of South Wales, Newport NP20 2BP, UK (MDPI, 2021-10-06)
      Innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship can be viewed as a recipe for delivering sustainable development goals to promote economic, human, and community growth among vulnerable and marginalised communities in South Africa (SA). This study critically analyses the trends and related issues perpetuating the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. It explores the link between innovative food production and food consumption entrepreneurship and underdevelopment based on sustainable development goals (SDGs). The study also generates a conceptual model designed to bridge the development gap between privileged and marginalised communities in SA. Philosophically, an interpretivism research paradigm based on the socialised interpretation of extant literature is pursued. Consistent with this stance, an inductive approach and qualitative methodological choices are applied using a combination of thematic analysis and grounded theory to generate research data. Grounded theory techniques determine the extent to which the literature review readings are simultaneously pursued, analysed, and conceptualised to generate the conceptual model. Research findings highlight the perpetual inequality in land distribution, economic and employability status, social mobility, gender equity, education, emancipation, empowerment, and quality of life between privileged and marginalised societies in SA. Underdevelopment issues such as poverty, unemployment, hunger, criminal activities, therefore, characterise marginalised communities and are linked to SDGs. Arguably, food production and food consumption entrepreneurship are ideally positioned to address underdevelopment by creating job opportunities, generating income, transforming the economic status, social mobility, and quality of life. Although such entrepreneurship development initiatives in SA are acknowledged, their impact remains insignificant because the interventions are traditionally prescriptive, fragmented, linear, and foreign-driven. A robust, contextualised, integrated, and transformative approach is developed based on the conceptual model designed to create a sustainable, innovative, and digital entrepreneurship development plan that will be executed to yield employment, generate income and address poverty, hunger, gender inequity. To bridge the gap between privileged and marginalised societies. The conceptual model will be used to bridge the perpetual development gap between privileged and marginalised societies. In SA is generated. Recommended future research directions include implementing, testing, and validating the model from a practical perspective through a specific project within selected marginalised communities.
    • The needs of clients coming to counselling following second harm: A Q methodology study

      Kenward, Linda; whiffin, charlotte; Townend, Michael; University of Derby (Wiley, 2021-09-30)
      Second harm is the added psychological distress from an inadequate response by healthcare providers in response to medical errors or neglect. This inadequate response may require patients to seek counselling. The counselling needs of patients who have experienced second harm have received limited research attention. This Q methodology study addresses this gap in knowledge in order to further inform counselling practice. Participants sorted 42 pre-determined statements online followed by interviews to establish the rationale for the sorting pattern choices. Data from the online sort were analysed using factor analysis to establish the viewpoints expressed. The interview data added to the interpretation of the viewpoints. Through a factor analysis, two ‘viewpoints’ and 11 counselling needs were identified. Nine of these needs were generic to the counselling relationship and two specific to second harm. This study concluded that people seeking counselling following second harm have needs beyond those expected from a general counselling relationship. These included not being blamed for what happened and a need for the counsellor to be able to demonstrate that they are able to understand the impact of harm. The needs identified in this study as being generic can give counsellors confidence in working with clients that have experienced second harm, knowing that many of the needs identified are not unique. Counsellors can also be confident that those needs that are unique can be understood through extending their knowledge of the topic and listening to those that have been harmed.
    • Development and testing of the Nature Connectedness Parental Self-Efficacy (NCPSE) scale

      Barnes, Christopher; Holland, Fiona G.; Harvey, Caroline; Wall, Su; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2021-09-08)
      There is growing interest in nature connectedness and its benefits to people, and more recently to parents and their children. However, very little research exists that investigates the abilities parents have to engage their children in nature-related activities – parental self-efficacy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to design, develop and validate a new measure of Nature Connectedness Parental Self-Efficacy (NCPSE). The NCPSE scale was created through a review of the literature, focus groups with parents and experts in the area, and a pilot study (n = 154) to assess an initial item pool of questions. Full reliability and validity testing was then conducted with 362 parents from the general population and of these 83 completed a test-retest follow-up survey. Exploratory Factor Analysis and reliability testing resulted in a 22- item measure with four subscales: Accessing Nature, Communicating about Nature, Overcoming Personal Barriers, and Overcoming Situational Barriers. Validity was also tested using the Generalised Self-Efficacy Scale, Nature Connectedness Index, and the WHO-5 wellbeing measure. The NCPSE demonstrated very good to excellent internal consistency as a whole and for each of its subscales, and is stable over time. Low to moderate correlations with the GSES, NCI and WHO-5 evidence the scales validity and illustrate that greater NCPSE is related to greater General Self-Efficacy, Nature Connectedness and Wellbeing of parents. NCPSE was also significantly and positively related to parental age and the average number of visits parents made to natural spaces each week either by themselves or together with their families. The evidence presented suggests that the NCPSE is a reliable and valid measure of parental self-efficacy related to nature connectedness. The scale may be useful when investigating the relationship between parent-child nature connectedness, specific population groups, and as a way of evaluating interventions designed to improve families’ connectedness to and engagement with nature.
    • Influence of Yawed Wind Flow on the Blade Forces/Bending Moments and Blade Elastic Torsion for an Axial-Flow Wind Turbine

      Ahmadi, Mohammad H. B.; Yang, Zhiyin; University of Derby (American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2021-09-16)
      Effects of yawed incoming flow on wind turbine blades forces and root bending moments (RBMs) are not fully understood. To advance our current understanding, numerical studies of a small-scale three-bladed horizontal axis wind turbine at TSR = 6.7 with yaw angles of zero and 45° have been carried out to examine the variations of blade and rotor loading due to the yawed incoming flow. An approach combining Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with Actuator Line Modelling (ALM) has been employed in the present study. The predicted phase-averaged blade forces reveal that the blade tangential force, in-plane RBM and power coefficient are much more sensitive to the upstream streamwise velocity variations and are much more strongly affected than the blade axial force, out-of-plane RBM and thrust coefficient. It also shows that for yawed incoming flows the blade axial force to the blade tangential force ratio fluctuates significantly during one rotor revolution, resulting in large variations of the blade elastic torsion and that the total blade force (magnitude and direction) undergoes a non-linear change in the circumferential and radial directions, which will likely lead to the reduction in the turbine operational life significantly, especially for long lightweight blades of large size wind turbines.
    • ‘I don’t wanna go. I’m staying. This is my home now.’ Analysis of an intervention for connecting young people to urban nature.

      Hallam, Jenny; Gallagher, Laurel; Harvey, Caroline; University of Derby; Urban Wilderness, Stoke on Trent (Elsevier, 2021-09-08)
      This paper uses ethnography to explore young people’s engagement with a UK based intervention designed to promote a meaningful connection to locally accessible urban nature. During the intervention seven young people (aged between 11 and 12 years old) from a socially disadvantaged area, took part in three two-hour sessions held in a patch of urban nature close to their school. During the sessions, facilitators and teachers worked collaboratively with the young people as they explored the space and took part in den building activities. All sessions were recorded using audio and video equipment and a case study approach was utilised to explore the experiences of two young people involved in the project as they worked with practitioners and each other to develop a meaningful connection to the space. Analysis highlights the importance of youth centred interventions which use practical activities to develop a sense of belonging and wellbeing. These issues are discussed in relation to traditional nature engagement interventions and recommendations for practitioners are put forward.
    • Green Jobs and Green Skills in the East Midlands

      Paterson, Fred; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-10-15)
      This Race to Zero White Paper explores the different definitions of ‘green jobs’ and ‘green skills’ and sets out what we know about the current state of ‘green collar’ jobs in the East Midlands and how the University of Derby is supporting the shift towards a sustainable economy.
    • Multilevel Inverter for Hybrid Fuel Cell/PV Energy Conversion System

      Fekik, Arezki; Hamida, Mohamed Lamine; Denoun, Hakim; Azar, Ahmad Taher; Kamal, Nashwa Ahmad; Amar, Bousbaine; Benamrouche, Nacereddine; University, Bouira, Algeria; Mouloud Mammeri University, Algeria; Prince Sultan University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; et al. (IGI Global, 2022)
      Power converters assume a significant part in fuel cell power generation systems and solar power conversion systems which are an alternative to fossil fuel production systems. There is therefore a demand for high quality power conditioning used in PEMFC systems and photovoltaic panels. This chapter proposes a hybrid electric power (FC/PV) production strategy with the use of converter topology as the power interface and also introduces a three-level inverter topology for different operating levels. The converter increases the input voltage to the rated voltage and turns into a DC bus; the multi-level inverter converts the voltage to AC and supplies AC loads. This chapter develops a hybrid electric power generation strategy, which can produce output with positive and zero sequences. Integrating the three-stage inverter into the hybrid renewable energy (FC/PV) production system allows for near sinusoidal current with low THD. The topology of hybrid energy production using the multi-level converter is tested on Matlab.
    • Home and away: building cultural capital to encourage progression to higher education

      Spink, Victoria; Hubbard, Megan; University of Derby (FACE, 2021-03-24)
      The Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Collaborative Outreach Programme (DANCOP), part of the Uni Connect Programme (formally the National Collaborative Outreach Programme), procured the services of World Challenge to co-deliver three separate ten-day trips to Morocco for year ten learners from areas of low progression across Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire. The trips were designed to improve the cultural capital (Bourdieu, 1977) of learners in response to schools’ requests for experiences that offer cultural enrichment and broaden horizons that they typically struggle to offer. With half of all local authority areas in the East Midlands being social mobility coldspots (Social Mobility Commission, 2017), DANCOP has had an opportunity to provide an experience for learners to encounter a completely different culture that they may not otherwise be able to engage with. This chapter explores the successes and challenges of executing successful trips abroad for school-age learners from areas where progression to higher education is low. It also examines whether the trips have had a positive impact on learners’ views of progression to higher education and learners’ attitudes towards self. This chapter was originally written and submitted in autumn 2019.
    • Falling Down: The Conservative Party and the Decline of Tory Britain

      Burton-Cartledge, Phil; University of Derby (Verso, 2021-09)
      Despite winning the December 2019 General Election, the Conservative parliamentary party is a moribund organisation. It no longer speaks for, nor to, the British people. Its leadership has sacrificed the long-standing commitment to the Union to “Get Brexit Done.” And beyond this, it is an intellectual vacuum, propped up by half-baked doctrine and magical thinking. Falling Down offers an explanation for how the Tory party came to position itself on the edge of the precipice and offers a series of answers to a question seldom addressed: as the party is poised to press the self-destruct button, what kind of role and future can it have? This tipping point has been a long time coming and Burton-Cartledge offers critical analysis to this narrative. Since the era of Thatcherism, the Tories have struggled to find a popular vision for the United Kingdom. At the same time, their members have become increasingly old. Their values have not been adopted by the younger voters. The coalition between the countryside and the City interests is under pressure, and the latter is split by Brexit. The Tories are locked into a declinist spiral, and with their voters not replacing themselves the party is more dependent on a split opposition—putting into question their continued viability as the favoured vehicle of British capital.
    • A common language and shared understanding?: Corpus approaches in support of system responses to family violence

      Penry Williams, Cara; Stebbins, Tonya N.; University of Derby; La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia (Edinburgh University Press, 2023)
      Family violence is an enduring social problem with devastating impacts. The Victorian Government (Australia) Royal Commission (state inquiry) into Family Violence (RCFV) noted that language is implicated in underreporting and under-recording of violence and emphasised the importance of agencies having ‘a common language’ and ‘shared understanding’ of family violence. Our analyses examine written submissions to the RCFV for frequencies and collocations, focussed on the construction and roles of human referents. We utilised corpus assisted discourse analysis to explore if community service and law-based professional bodies do have common vocabularies and if these represent shared ideas, responding directly to agendas set by those involved. Analyses show key differences but also undercover a shared lack of agency given to victims and a loss of focus on the role of those who inflict these forms of violence. We argue for the utility of corpus linguistic methods to empirically show how language is used to construct conceptualisations of family violence across key sectors of the service system. We intend this research as a starting point for discussion between professionals working to improve cross-sector communication, by bringing linguistic insights to this deep-rooted social issue.
    • Transcending Racial Divisions: Anti-racism and Identity Politics

      Hayes, Dennis; Mieschbuehler, Ruth; Louis Dit Sully, Christine Aristide (University of DerbyCollege of Arts, Humanities and Education, 2021-09-15)
      The issue of race is one of the most important concerns of Western society today. This concern takes many forms and has entered all aspects of our lives. The social, economic and political worlds are all affected by discussions, contestations and conflicts involving racial thinking and the notion of race. In the political realm, the question of racial identities is one of the forms in which this contemporary concern for race takes place. The use of our racial identities in political discussions is understood today as ‘identity politics’. This research examines the notions of race, racism, identity, politics and identity politics in the past and in the present and explores the contemporary relationships between politics, identity politics, the concern for racial identities and the notion of race. With such a comprehensive approach, it provides insights as to why the question of racial identity has taken such an important space in public discourse and in politics. It shows that the notion of race, a product of history, has anti-human, anti-rational and anti-political foundations which have been kept in the modern notion of culture. The use of racial identities in politics, a particular form of identity politics, is not a new phenomenon. Identity politics using politicised racial identities has existed throughout the historical development of race. The research compares the classical and contemporary meaning of politics and argues that identity politics, understood as identity-based politics or as the use of social identities within the political realm, is not politics in the classical meaning of politics. What has changed since the first use of politicised racial identities is the various understandings of humanity as individuals and the consequent degradation of political thinking. The philosophical concern for the Self, personhood, subject or identity has been a very particular interest in the Western world since the seventeenth century. However, the focus on psychology and personal identity has given rise to the psychological self. Under certain social and political circumstances such as the widespread atomisation of society, the development of the therapeutic culture, the common support for anti-Enlightenment ideas and the psychological approaches to understanding the world has led to contemporary identity politics being organised within a culture of competitive victimhood. This research shows that the focus on racial identities in public discourse is creating problems for an effective opposition to racism but is also producing an expansion of anti-political and anti-human thinking.
    • Noninvasive continuous intradialytic blood pressure monitoring: the key to improving haemodynamic stability

      Stewart, Paul; Stewart, Jill; University of Derby (Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health), 2021-08-27)
      Intradialytic hypotension (IDH) occurs in 20% of haemodialysis treatments, leading to end-organ ischaemia, increased morbidity and mortality; and contributing to poor quality of life for patients. Treatment of IDH is reactive since brachial blood pressure (BP) is recorded only intermittently during haemodialysis, making early detection and prediction of hypotension impossible. Noninvasive continuous BP monitoring would allow earlier detection of IDH and thus support the development of methods for its prediction and consequently prevention. Noninvasive continuous BP monitoring is not yet part of routine practice in renal dialysis units, with a small number of devices (e.g. finger cuffs) having occasionally been used in research settings. In use, patients frequently report pain or discomfort at measurement sites. Additionally, these devices can be unreliable in patients with reduced blood flow to the digits, often manifest in dialysis patients. All existing methods are sensitive to patient movement. A new method for continuously estimating BP has been developed by monitoring arterial pressure near the arteriovenous fistula which can be achieved without any extraneous monitoring equipment attached to the patient. Additionally, artificial intelligence-based methods for real-time prediction of IDH are currently emerging.Key monitoring technologies and computational methods are emerging to support the development of real-time IDH prediction.
    • Proximity Collective

      Howard, Rebecca; Atkinson, Anne-Marie; Haynes, Jackie; Hall, Antony; Charragher, Ann; Joy-Ford, Sarah; Abingdon Studios, Blackpool; University of Derby (2021-08-26)
      Proximity Collective (artist group, established in 2019) explore the social and spatial aspects of practice-research and notions of convivial aesthetics. In 2021, they were invited by Abingdon Studios to showcase their work in the window space and the upstairs project space. The idea of the exhibition was to demonstrate how working collectively has impacted their individual practices and their approaches to practice-as-research.
    • Discovering intercultural communication: From language users to language use

      Kim, Hyejeong; Penry Williams, Cara; University of Melbourne, Australia; University of Derby; La Trobe University, Australia (Palgrave Macmillan / Springer, 2021-12-26)
      This textbook provides a succinct, contemporary introduction to intercultural communication with a focus on actual language use. With English as a lingua franca and Communicative Accommodation Theory as the underpinning concepts, it explores communication, language use, and culture in action. Each chapter includes discourse extracts so that students can apply what they have learned to real text examples, and supplementary instructor materials including suggestions for discussion points and activities are hosted on springer.com. The book will be key reading for students taking modules on Intercultural Communication or Language, Culture and Communication as part of a degree in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, or English Language both at undergraduate and postgraduate level.
    • A Novel Security Methodology for Smart Grids: A Case Study of Microcomputer-Based Encryption for PMU Devices

      Varan, Metin; Akgul, Akif; Kurugollu, Fatih; Sansli, Ahmet; Smith, Kim; University of Applied Sciences, Serdivan 54050, Sakarya, Turkey; Hitit University, Corum 19030, Turkey; University of Derby (Hindawi Limited, 2021-09-18)
      Coordination of a power system with the phasor measurement devices (PMUs) in real time on the load and generation sides is carried out within the context of smart grid studies. Power systems equipped with information systems in a smart grid pace with external security threats. Developing a smart grid which can resist against cyber threats is considered indispensable for the uninterrupted operation. In this study, a two-way secure communication methodology underpinned by a chaos-based encryption algorithm for PMU devices is proposed. (e proposed system uses the IEEE-14 busbar system on which the optimum PMU placement has been installed. (e proposed hyperchaotic system-based encryption method is applied as a new security methodology among PMU devices. (e success of results is evaluated by the completeness of data exchange, durations, the complexity of encryption-decryption processes, and strength of cryptography using a microcomputer-based implementation. (e results show that the proposed microcomputer-based encryption algorithms can be directly embedded as encryption hardware units into PMU and PDC devices which have very fast signal processing capabilities taking into considerations the acceptable delay time for power system protection and measuring applications and quality metering applications which is 2 ms and 10 ms, respectively. While proposed algorithms can be used in TCP or UDP over IP-based IEEE C37.118, IEC 61850, and IEC 61850-90-5 communication frameworks, they can also be embedded into electronic cards, smartcards, or smart tokens which are utilized for authentication among smart grid components.
    • The Covid-19 Pandemic as an Opportunity for Positive Psychology to Promote a Wider-Ranging Definition of Humour and Laughter

      Gonot-Schoupinsky, Freda; Garip, Gülcan; Independent Researcher, Monte Carlo, Monaco; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan/ Springer, 2021-09-17)
      Traditionally, positive psychology (PP) considers humour as one of 24 character strengths and associates it with the core virtue of transcendence, a view perpetuated in Second Wave PP. We debate the need for a wider conceptualisation of humour and a more pragmatic recognition of its benefits and applications within the framework of Third Wave PP. Anecdotal and observational findings relating to the use of humour during the Covid-19 pandemic are considered. We draw on empirical research revealing the diverse benefits of humour and laughter in different cultural settings, including during lockdown. Using examples, including Covid-19 humour, we contend that the depiction of beneficial humour in PP is incomplete, for example, it relates not only to transcendence but to all six core virtues, and misleading as it may not necessarily relate to any. A more practical and broader depiction of humour within Third Wave PP would be helpful, including emphasising the potential of multiple character strengths to support humour development. In particular, we highlight the need for laughter, currently viewed as a by-product of humour within PP, to play a more prominent role. Widening the portrayal of humour and laughter in PP will be helpful to value and harness their individual, and joint, benefits and applications. In this chapter, we call for Third Wave PP to encourage new research directions by embracing the complexity of humour as 1) an interlinked character strength; 2) associated to all core virtues; 3) benefitting overall personal development; and 4) differentiated from but co-equal to laughter.
    • Actantial construction of career guidance in parliament of Finland’s education policy debates 1967–2020

      Varjo, Janne; Kalalahti, Mira; Hooley, Tristram; University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; University of Turku, Turku, Finland; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-09-14)
      In this paper we examine the objectives and meanings of the career guidance provided in comprehensive education as set out in discussions in the Parliament of Finland. We approach the topic through an exploration of parliamentary sessions concerning three major legislative proposals for reforming compulsory education in Finland. The premise is that the parliamentary discussions concerning guidance provided in comprehensive education reflect the rationalities that underpin guidance in different eras in Finland and elsewhere. Examining these rationalities provides a way to explore the principles which frame career guidance policy in Finland. Using the actantial model as a methodological tool, the analysis aims to discover the actantial positions in the parliamentary discussions and the interactions that emerge between these. The various actantial narratives demonstrate the way in which guidance is influenced by wider ideological trends. The actantial analysis portrays a shift from the more structural corporatist approaches of the 1960s when the object of guidance was to fulfil the needs of society, towards more third way individualism in 1990s. The current reform of 2020 to extend compulsory education and reinforce guidance may represent some return to more structural approaches.
    • The Beginning of Process: 1 of 366 prints taken from the same plate and The End of Process: 366 of 366 prints taken from the same plate

      Bartram, Angela; University of Derby (2021-09)
      Prints numbers 1 and 366 from the series 366:366 (finally) were exhibited in the All the Small Things exhibition, Artcore, Derby, September 2021. For the leap year of 2016 I exhaled on an etching plate every day. 366 breaths layered on the same surface, in the same place, and at roughly the same time. The accumulative breaths charted the process of isolating and capturing those layered singular exhalations, and over the next 4 years the act was reversed through printmaking methods. ‘366:366 (finally)’ was a work in and indebted to process; a series of prints made from the etched plate to match the number of breaths which scored it’s image.
    • Targeting Sedentary Behavior in Minority Populations as a Feasible Health Strategy during and beyond COVID-19: On Behalf of ACSM-EIM and HL-PIVOT

      Lassalle, Patricia Pagan; Meyer, Michelle L.; Conners, Ryan; Zieff, Gabriel; Rojas, Jacklyn; Faghy, Mark A.; Arena, Ross; Vermeesch, Amber; Joseph, Rodney P.; Stoner, Lee; et al. (Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health), 2021-08-01)
      Increased sedentary behavior has been an unintended consequence of social and physical distancing restrictions needed to limit transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Sedentary behavior is defined as any waking behavior characterized by an energy expenditure ≤1.5 METs while in a sitting, reclining, or lying posture. These restrictions negatively affect peoples’ cardiometabolic and mental health and disproportionately affect certain sectors of the population, including racial/ethnic minorities. In part, the higher risk for complications of COVID-19 could be the result of an increased prevalence of comorbid diseases. Further, regular participation and adherence to current physical activity guidelines, defined as at least 150 min·wk−1 of moderate-intensity physical activity or muscle strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week, is challenging for many and may be especially difficult to achieve during the COVID-19 pandemic. A practical strategy to promote health and well-being during COVID-19 is reducing sedentary behavior. Reducing sedentary behaviors (e.g., breaking up periods of prolonged sitting with light-intensity physical activity) may be more easily achieved than physical activity for all individuals, including individuals of racial/ethnic decent, as it does not require purchasing equipment nor require compromising the physical restrictions necessary to slow the spread of COVID-19. The purpose of this commentary is to argue that sedentary behavior is a feasible, independent target to modify during COVID-19, particularly in minority populations, and to address this behavior we need to consider individual, environmental, and policy-level factors.
    • A Woman's World

      Bartram, Angela; Parker, Christine; University of Derby (2021-09)
      What happens in the daily life of a woman in a DAC nation? What challenges do they face; what delights do they encounter? This artistic research project captures the daily activities of young women living in Mexico or of Mexican decent. The video tells the story of a month that is normal, domestic, and part of the personal and everyday for these women.