Now showing items 1-20 of 6186

    • Opinions of small and medium UK construction companies on environmental management systems

      Bailey, Matthew; Booth, Colin A; Horry, Rosemary; Vidalakis, Christos; Mahamadu, Abdul-Majeed; Awuah, Kwasi Gyau Baffour; University of Derby; University of the West of England; University of Salford (Thomas Telford Ltd, 2021-02-16)
      Pressure to reduce the environmental impact of construction activities has increased, such that a paradigm shift is required. This paper presents stakeholder opinions of environmental management systems as a means for the construction industry to respond to these issues. Using a previous approach, the views of small and medium construction companies were sought, using questionnaires to ask respondents to reveal their perceived benefits of and barriers to implementing the ISO 14000 suite of environmental management standards in the UK. Detailed statistical analysis showed that environmental management systems can sometimes produce quantifiable benefits to organisations in terms of cost reduction. However, from a contractor’s view, the greatest benefit was a reduction in environmental impact outweighing financial benefits. Findings also demonstrated numerous barriers to an organisation exist, both internal and external, regarding adoption and use of environmental management systems. The most critical barrier was that cost savings do not always balance with the expense of implementation. Furthermore, waste minimisation at the design stage is viewed as most important. In general, the opinions gauged in this study indicated that short-term profits are normally considered more imperative than long-term gains. Therefore, despite a need to focus on developing strategies for removing or reducing the challenges of environmental management systems, the reality is that they may not be the panacea to sustainable development, as is often touted.
    • Holidays and economic growth: Evidence from a panel of Indian states

      Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan; Apergis, Nicholas; University of Derby; University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA (Wiley, 2021-05-01)
      The number of holidays differs significantly across Indian states. Moreover, some of the governing political parties have been accused of using holidays as a tool either to mollify disgruntled workers or to woo voters before the state elections. In this context, this paper explores the relationship between the number of holidays and economic growth across 24 Indian states, spanning the period 2008–2016, by employing a panel model analysis. The paper presents evidence suggesting that holidays seem to affect growth negatively in the rich states but are inconsequential for the growth performance of the poor states.
    • Times they are a changing: evaluating interventions in a new era

      Astley, Jo; Church, Emma; University of Derby; East Midlands Widening Participation Research and Evaluation Partnership (FACE, 2021-03-24)
      This chapter will outline the University of Derby’s response to that APP requirement of evidence-based practice to address the inequitable HE outcomes of under-represented groups. It will firstly share the University’s current evaluation practices concerning access, in which the East Midlands Widening Participation Research and Evaluation Partnership (EMWPREP) plays such a key role. It will then move on to demonstrate how the University has utilised Theory of Change to embed evidence-based practice across the whole student lifecycle, and discuss the methods and methodologies that will be adopted within a new framework to evaluate interventions, and identify new areas for research. The chapter concludes by reflecting on key areas of focus required by the University through the 2019-2020 academic year, in order for the institution to be well equipped to meet its APP reporting requirements when the first monitoring return is due in spring 2022. It will also reflect on the challenges that the institution faces (as well as the sector as a whole), in order to fulfil OfS expectations.
    • Researching entrepreneurship: an approach to develop subjective understanding

      Rajasinghe, Duminda; Aluthgama-Baduge, Chinthaka; Mulholland, Gary; University of Northampton, Northampton, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK; AFG College with University of Aberdeen, Doha, Qatar (Emerald, 2021-04-29)
      Entrepreneurship is a complex social activity. Hence, knowledge production in the field requires inclusivity and diversity within research approaches and perspectives to appreciate the richness of the phenomenon. However, the dominance of positivist research in the field is visible, and the current qualitative research is also predominantly restricted to popular templates. This seems to have limited the understanding of entrepreneurship. This paper critically discusses the appropriateness of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) as an innovative qualitative research methodology that facilitates a fuller appreciation of the richness and diversity of entrepreneurship. This conceptual paper critically evaluates IPA's relevance for the stated purpose by reviewing both entrepreneurship and IPA literature. It discusses how IPA's philosophical underpinnings facilitate scholars to appreciate the wholeness of the phenomenon and provides literature informed data analysis guidance, thereby addressing some of the weaknesses of the qualitative research within the field. Critical evaluation of the literature suggests that IPA is an appropriate research methodology for entrepreneurship. It has the potential to address some interesting and timely questions to elaborate, deepen and qualify existing theory or to study relatively unexplored areas within the field. The laid-out guidance helps scholars to develop informed rationale for their research decisions and to ensure quality and rigour in qualitative research. This paper promotes the analysis of how people make sense of their experience as a valid way of knowing. IPA has a unique identity as it incorporates phenomenology, hermeneutics and idiography as a way to explore first-hand human experience to uncover qualitative understanding of entrepreneurship. The clear guidance and justifications in the paper promote scholarly confidence and address some preconceptions related to rigour, quality and validity of qualitative studies. Incorporating IPA into entrepreneurship, the paper also contributes to the demand for diversity, inclusivity and pluralism in qualitative research perspectives and approaches.
    • A readiness self-assessment model for implementing Green Lean Initiatives

      Cherrafi, Anass; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Belhadi, Amine; Kamble, S.S; Elbaz, Jamal; Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, Morocco; University of Derby; Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco; EDHEC Business School, Roubaix, 59057, France; ENCG –Agadir, Ibn Zohr University, Agadir, Morocco (Elsevier, 2021-05-07)
      This paper proposes a self-assessment model to evaluate the level of readiness of organizations to implement Green Lean initiatives. A systematic literature review was conducted to synthesize the key elements of the implementation of Green Lean, barriers and its critical success factors. The proposed instrument was validated through semi-structured interviews and workshops with experts from academia and industry and applied in four manufacturing companies in a developing country. The results revealed that the proposed self-assessment model is an appropriate instrument to determine the readiness of organizations for effectively implementing Green Lean. The proposed self-assessment model was able to display the potential challenges a company will face if it aims to integrate Green and Lean and implement it. The results of this paper will help the practitioners to conduct a diagnostic of requirements for Green Lean adoption, thereby increasing the probability of success of such an initiative before a company spends its resources on the project. Consequently, this paper will contribute to encouraging the effective implementation of Green Lean initiatives and serving as implications for further exploration and contribution to this area.
    • Educators Perspectives on the Value of Physical Education, Physical Activity and Fundamental Movement Skills for Early Years Foundation Stage Children in England.

      Dobell, Alexandra; Pringle, Andy; Faghy, Mark A; Roscoe, Clare M P; University of Derby (MDPI, 2021-04-26)
      There is a lack of information available for physical education (PE) provision in the early years foundation stage (EYFS), prompting concern about what is currently delivered in schools and the values behind the approaches taken. Using semi-structured interviews, this study investigated educators’ perspectives on the value of PE and physical activity (PA) for EYFS children across England in relation to opportunities for, barriers to, and benefits of PA and PE. This study collected important stakeholder views and can help shape the impact and implementation of fundamental movement skills (FMS) and PA interventions at the EYFS.
    • Training careers professionals: Underpinning research for the C-Course programme.

      Hooley, Tristram; Schulstok, Torild; University of Derby; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (Inland Norway University of Applied Science, 2021)
      This report sets out the findings of research conducted in the Czech Republic, Norway, Slovakia and Poland to underpin the development of a new professional e-learning programme for careers practitioners. The recommendations are based on a review of the literature, desk research in each of the countries, expert interviews and practitioner focus groups. Overall, the research finds that: 1. there is a clear demand for an e-learning course for careers practitioners across the four countries. The e-learning should: 2. be clearly articulated in a way that clarifies who should engage with it and why; 3. be flexible to ensure that a wide range of practitioners can access and benefit from it; 4. include interaction with others and foster a community of practice; and 5. make use of a range of technologies by using multi-media and interactive tools. In terms of content, the training should include: 6. clarification of the key terminology and definitions with the field; 7. an overview different approaches to delivering careers services; 8. how to work with a range of different sectors and different client groups; 9. how to work more systemically e.g. with families, communities and organisations; 10. knowledge about the education system, labour market and the research skills required to gather this information for yourself; 11. support for those who are undergoing the training to become professionals and adopt healthy, ethical, reflective, and context-aware practice; and 12. an overview of key theories and evidence for more advanced practitioners.
    • “Upskirting,” Homosociality, and Craftmanship: A Thematic Analysis of Perpetrator and Viewer Interactions

      Hall, Matthew; Hearn, Jeff; Lewis, Ruth; Arden University; British University in Egypt; University of Derby; University of Huddersfield; Örebro University; Hanken School of Economics; Northumbria University (Sage, 2021-05-05)
      “Upskirting” is the action or practice of surreptitiously taking photographs or videos up a female’s skirt or dress. In the United Kingdom, it is an offense. However, internationally, laws are uneven. Understanding how perpetrators account for their actions becomes an important question. Here, we present the findings of our thematic analysis of posts on the “upskirting” website, The Candid Zone. Our analysis shows that posters and respondents frame this activity as artistic and technical, providing each other with advice and guidance on where and how to get the “best” shots. We conceptualize this form of abuse as homosociality and craftsmanship.
    • Relationships Between Creativity, Wellbeing, and Learning and Their Implications for Students in Higher Education

      Hughes, Gareth; University of Derby (Springer Link, 2019-07-06)
      There are a number of claims in the literature that by increasing creativity and creative learning, it may be possible to improve student wellbeing and learning and academic performance (e.g., Robinson and Aronica 2016). To evaluate this claim, it is first important to consider the contested relationship between wellbeing and creativity and then to consider the implications of these findings for student wellbeing, learning, and performance.
    • Pre-competition body mass loss characteristics of Brazilian jiu-jitsu competitors in the United Kingdom

      White, Tyler; Kirk, Christopher; University of Derby (SAGE Publications, 2021-01-05)
      Brazilian jiu-jitsu (BJJ) is a grappling-based combat sport in which competitors engage in pre-competition acute ‘weight’ loss (AWL) and rapid ‘weight’ loss (RWL) to achieve the body mass (BM) required for their desired division. AWL/RWL practices of UK BJJ competitors have not previously been reported. Our aim in this study was to determine the prevalence, magnitude and stakeholder influences of AWL and RWL amongst BJJ participants in the United Kingdom (UK). A secondary aim was to explore whether there is any influence of time spent in the sport or competition frequency on AWL/RWL practices. In this study we used the rapid weight loss questionnaire (RWLQ) adapted for BJJ to determine the prevalence and magnitude of AWL/RWL in UK BJJ, the prevalence of methods used and the key stakeholder influences on these practices. As a secondary investigation we aimed to determine whether there was any effect of age starting BJJ on AWL/RWL. Of 115 completed responses, 59% stated they performed AWL/RWL before competition. Mean BM loss for this competition was 1.9 ± 3.8 kg (2.3 ± 4.6%), with 34% of participants starting BM loss 3–7 days prior and 16% starting 0–2 days prior. Methods used tend to be achieving calorie deficit via exercise and diet rather than hypohydration, with little advice from formally qualified personnel. Participants who perform AWL/RWL started training (BF10 = 199, d = .72) and competing (BF10 = 107, d = .68) in BJJ younger than those who do not perform AWL/RWL. AWL/RWL is prevalent in UK BJJ, but not at the magnitude of other combat sports or countries. Though negative effects of extreme hypohydration are unlikely, there may be a higher chance of eating disorders in BJJ, particularly due to the young age of AWL/RWL commencement.
    • Effects of Shinrin-yoku Retreat on Mental Health: A Pilot Study in Fukushima, Japan

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Fido, Dean; University of Derby (Springer, 2021-05-06)
      Shinrin-yoku (forest bathing) is a cost-effective healing practice that has recently attracted the interest of social scientists who have attributed it, in part, to mental health benefits. Japanese university students suffer from high rates of mental health problems, and the number of suicides remain high despite the total number of suicides in Japan decreasing. Effective mental health approaches which increase mental wellbeing and self-compassion, and reduce associated deficits, such as loneliness, are sought after for Japanese students, however healthful treatment has not been identified to date. Accordingly, this pre-post pilot study evaluated the levels of mental wellbeing, self-compassion, and loneliness among 25 Japanese undergraduate students who participated in a three-day shinrin-yoku retreat in Fukushima. Measurements were taken prior, straight after, and two weeks-post intervention. One-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc analysis revealed that the mean scores of self-compassion, common humanity, and mindfulness increased statistically significantly from pre-retreat to follow-up. The mean scores of mental wellbeing and loneliness did not statistically significantly change. The positive effects on self-compassion indicate that shinrin-yoku retreat should be evaluated within a larger sample and in a shorter time frame to establish optimal shinrin-yoku parameters in this arena.
    • A systematic literature review regarding the influence of lean manufacturing on firms’ financial performance

      Dieste, M; Panizzolo, R; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy; Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Bolzano, Italy; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-04-07)
      The lean philosophy has demonstrated its effectiveness to improve firms’ operational performance. However, the impact of lean practices on financial performance is still unclear due to the poor understanding of the link between operational and financial measures and the conflictive results obtained by previous research. The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic literature review to understand whether lean companies have improved their financial performance. Moreover, this article aims to uncover research gaps in the literature and examine which time spans of research have been considered to analyse both the degree of lean implementation and the measurement of financial outcomes. A systematic literature review has been conducted to identify peer-reviewed articles that analyse the effect of the lean production paradigm on the financial performance measures of manufacturing companies. Then, the identified articles were processed using a combination of descriptive and content analyses methods to draw new conclusions, uncover gaps and find novel paths for research. Various authors indicate that lean initiatives lead to an enhancement of financial performance measures. JIT and TQM lean practice bundles are suggested as the best enablers of financial performance in terms of sales and profit. In contrast, according to some scholars, lean does not necessarily improve companies’ financial results if it is not properly implemented. Despite several studies have focused on analysing the effects of lean on performance, only a small part of the literature has addressed the study of the effects of lean practices on financial performance metrics. The originality of this study lies in the investigation of the connections between lean practices and financial performance measures found in the literature. The outcome is the identification of various possible positive impacts of some lean practices on financial metrics.
    • Improving the sustainability of food supply chains through circular economy practices – a qualitative mapping approach

      Batista, Luciano; Dora, Manoj; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, Vikas; Aston University, Birmingham; Brunel University, Uxbridge; University of Derby; University of the West of England (Emerald, 2021-04-30)
      The purpose of this paper is to present a methodological approach to support qualitative analysis of waste flows in food supply chains. The methodological framework introduced allows the identification of circular food waste flows that can maximise the sustainability of food supply chains. Following a qualitative approach, circular economy perspectives are combined with core industrial ecology concepts in the specification of a standardised analytical method to map food waste flows and industrial synergies across a supply chain. The mapped waste flows and industrial linkages depict two time-related scenarios: 1. Current scenarios showing the status quo of existing food waste flows, and 2. Future scenarios pointing out circular flows along the supply chain. The future scenarios inform potential alternatives to take waste flows up the food waste hierarchy. The qualitative approach do not allow generalisations of findings out of the scope of the study. The framework is intended for providing focused analysis, case by case. Future research involving mixedmethods where quantitative approaches complement the qualitative perspectives of the framework would expand the analytical perspective. The framework provides a relatively low cost and pragmatic method to identify alternatives to minimise landfill disposals and improve the sustainability of food supply chains. Its phased methodology and standardised outcomes serve as a referential basis to inform not only comparative analysis, but also policy making and strategic decisions aimed at transforming linear food supply chains into circular economy ecosystems.
    • Machine Learning Applications for Sustainable Manufacturing: A Bibliometric-based Review for Future Research

      Jamwal, Anbesh; Agrawal, R; Sharma, M; Kumar, A; Kumar, V; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, India; London Metropolitan University; University of the West of England; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-05-06)
      The role of data analytics is significantly important in manufacturing industries as it holds the key to address sustainability challenges and handle the large amount of data generated from different types of manufacturing operations. The present study, therefore, aims to conduct a systematic and bibliometric-based review in the applications of machine learning (ML) techniques for sustainable manufacturing (SM). In the present study, we use a bibliometric review approach that is focused on the statistical analysis of published scientific documents with an unbiased objective of the current status and future research potential of ML applications in sustainable manufacturing. The present study highlights how manufacturing industries can benefit from ML techniques when applied to address SM issues. Based on the findings, a ML-SM framework is proposed. The framework will be helpful to researchers, policymakers and practitioners to provide guidelines on the successful management of SM practices. A comprehensive and bibliometric review of opportunities for ML techniques in SM with a framework is still limited in the available literature. This study addresses the bibliometric analysis of ML applications in SM, which further adds to the originality
    • US partisan conflict uncertainty and oil prices

      Apergis, Nicholas; Hayat, Tasawar; Saeed, Tareq; University of Derby; King Abdulaziz, University, Saudi Arabia; Quaid-I-Azam University, Pakistan (Elsevier BV, 2021-01-13)
      This empirical study significantly contributes in building emerging literature by investigating the impact of US partisan conflict uncertainty on international oil prices. It models oil prices through non-linear Quantile Autoregressive Distributed Lag (QARDL) methods in order to consider potential (non-linear) asymmetric effects of partisan political uncertainty on oil prices. The empirical results clearly document the asymmetric (non-linear) impact of partisan conflict uncertainty on international oil prices, which has been in contrast to the linear case. The findings also expose that the transmission mechanism of partisan political uncertainty to oil prices is validated through the economic growth channel. The empirical findings contribute to existing research by assisting investors in the oil industry with risk identification, analysis, and mitigation. The results can assist in discovering the links between US political risk and oil markets, determining an important element of political risk factors facing investors who want to participate in the oil industry.
    • Teaching ‘freedom of speech’ freely

      Whickman, Paul; University of Derby (Manchester University Press, 2020-11-20)
      Despite being on the teaching front line, academics are commonly excluded from debates concerning the supposed ‘free speech’ crisis on campuses. This chapter offers an academic perspective, arguing that the increasingly common perception of students as sensitive or censorious is not borne out in the classroom. This chapter is particularly inspired by experiences over the past five years in teaching on literary censorship, offence and ‘freedom of speech’ in literature from the seventeenth century to the present day. Following this anecdotal experience, this chapter turns to argue that much of the furore concerning free speech on university campuses comes from a position of bad faith; to insist, as many commentators do, that no topic should be off-limits, is commonly not applied to the very concept of ‘freedom of speech’ itself, despite its loose definition and weighty cultural baggage. In addition, it argues that freedom of speech, like all ‘freedoms’, involves being freed from things as much as it involves being left free to do them. This has important teaching implications. To encourage the ‘freest’ speech in the classroom is to discourage monopoly of conversation; this requires a respectful, diverse environment. It concludes that the weaponisation of ‘free speech’ commonly undermines itself as it is demonstrably more concerned with the preservation of the voices of particularly privileged groups than in encouraging plurality of opinion.
    • Career Development Framework: Using the Framework to support career education and guidance in secondary schools (Key stage 3 - post-16)

      Hooley, Tristram; Career Development Institute (Career Development Institute, 2021)
      This document introduces the CDI’s Career Development Framework for secondary schools. It clarifies the skills, knowledge and attitudes that individuals need to have a positive career and explores how secondary schools can support pupils to build their career development skills. A ‘positive career’ will mean something different to different people, but it will typically include being happy with the way you spend your time, being able to make a contribution to your community and being able to have a decent standard of living.
    • Career Development Framework

      Hooley, Tristram; Career Development Institute (Career Development Institute, 2021)
      This document introduces the CDI’s Career Development Framework to careers professionals, educators and other professionals who work supporting people to develop their careers. Its main purpose is to clarify the skills, knowledge and attitudes that individuals need to have a positive career and to provide a framework for planning support for career development.
    • Redeveloping the CDI framework

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2021)
      This paper describes a project that took place in 2020 to redevelop the CDI’s Careers, Employability and Enterprise Framework. The aim of the project was to update the existing framework by drawing in insights from key stakeholders and users of the framework. In addition, it was hoped to broaden out the relevance of the current CDI framework beyond its basis in secondary education to create a lifelong, all-age career management/ development skills framework
    • The effect of fine droplets on laminar propagation speed of a strained acetone-methane flame: Experiment and simulations

      Fan, Luming; Tian, Bo; Chong, Cheng Tung; Jaafar, Mohammad Nazri Mohd; Tanno, Kenji; McGrath, Dante; Oliveira, Pedro M.de; Rogg, Bernd; Hochgreb, Simone; University of Derby; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-07-31)
      In this study, we investigate the effect of the presence of fuel droplets, their size and concentration, on stretched laminar flame speeds. We consider premixed strained methane/air mixtures, with the addition of small acetone droplets, and compare the flame velocity field behaviour to that of the fully vaporized mixture. An impinging stagnation flame configuration is used, to which a narrowly distributed polydisperse mist of acetone droplets is added. Total acetone molar concentrations between 9% and 20% per mole of methane are used, corresponding to 18.6% and 41.4% of the total fuel energy. The Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) of acetone droplets is varied from 1.0 to 4.7 μm by carefully tuning the air flow rate passing through an atomizer. The droplet size distribution is characterized by a Phase Doppler Anamometry (PDA) system at the outlet of the burner. The flame propagation speed is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for overall equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.4 at various strain rates, and the result is compared with a reference case in which acetone was fully vaporized. Unlike the fully vaporized flame, a two-stage reaction flame structure is observed for all droplet cases: a blue premixed flame front followed by a reddish luminous zone. Comparison of the results between gas-only and droplet-laden cases shows that the mean reference burning velocity of the mixture is significantly enhanced when droplets are present under rich cases, whereas the opposite is true for stoichiometric and lean cases. The mean droplet size also changes the relationship between flame speed and strain rate, especially for rich cases. The result suggests that with typical conditions found in laminar strained flames, even for the finest droplets that may have been vaporized before reaching the flame front, the resulting inhomogeneities may lead the flame to behaves differently from the well-premixed gaseous counterpart. Simulations at similar conditions are performed using a two-phase counterflow flame model to compare with experimental data. Model results of reference velocities do not compare well with observations, and the possible reasons for this behaviour are discussed, including the difficulties in determining the pre-vaporization process and thus the boundary conditions, as well as the fidelity of the current point-source based 1D model.