Now showing items 1-20 of 5294

    • Evaluation of the careers leader training

      Williams, Joy; Akehurst, Georgie; Alexander, Kate; Pollard, Emma; Williams, Ceri; Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Employment Studies; University of Derby (Institute of Employment Studies, 2020-05)
      This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the careers leaders training programme which was funded by the Careers & Enterprise Company.
    • The legacy of Mad Men: cultural history, intermediality and American television

      McNally, K; Marcellus, J; Forde, Teresa; Fairclough, K; London Metropolitan University; Middle Tennessee State University; University of Derby; University of Salford (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-12-12)
      For seven seasons, viewers worldwide watched as ad man Don Draper moved from adultery to self-discovery, secretary Peggy Olson became a take-no-prisoners businesswoman, object-of-the-gaze Joan Holloway developed a feminist consciousness, executive Roger Sterling tripped on LSD, and smarmy Pete Campbell became a surprisingly nice guy. Mad Men defined a pivotal moment for television, earning an enduring place in the medium’s history. This edited collection examines the enduringly popular television series as Mad Men still captivates audiences and scholars in its nuanced depiction of a complex decade. This is the first book to offer an analysis of Mad Men in its entirety, exploring the cyclical and episodic structure of the long form series and investigating issues of representation, power and social change. The collection establishes the show’s legacy in televisual terms, and brings it up to date through an examination of its cultural importance in the Trump era. Aimed at scholars and interested general readers, the book illustrates the ways in which Mad Men has become a cultural marker for reflecting upon contemporary television and politics.
    • Introduction

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars, 2018-09-01)
    • Archaea and rejoicing the sun

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (Royal Photographic Society, 2019)
    • Twenty-first century book studies: the state of the discipline

      Noorda, Rachel; Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (Project Muse, 2019-05-16)
    • The first rule of judging club…: inside the saltire society literary awards

      Marsden, Stevie; Squires, Claire; University of Leicester; University of Stirling (Lectito BV, 2019-12-11)
      Book awards are a pervasive aspect of contemporary book culture, attracting both substantial media and scholarly attention. They confer prestige, create marketing opportunities, push sales, and contribute to the early stages of canon formation. Yet, beyond occasional media splashes when judges break ranks and disagree, there is little insight into the administrative and decision-making processes inside book awards. This article draws on the autoethnographic experiences of two academic researchers, who were simultaneously participants (as administrator and judge) for the Saltire Society Literary Awards. In so doing, the article gives insight into particular moments within the administration and judging of the awards, such as changes instigated by research findings and debates surrounding gender imbalance in Scottish literary award culture. It also examines some of the challenges of operating as embedded researchers. The article analyses what autoethnographic methods can bring to an understanding of the Saltire Society’s Literary Awards and other cultural awards, and the implications of embedded research and collaborative autoethnography for 21st century book culture scholarship more widely. It reflects upon modes of embedded research by making evident the challenges and dilemmas of researching from the ‘inside’. The ethical framework for such research is far from simple, but in exploring particular moments with perspectives from both inside and outside the judging processes, and in interrogating the practices of literary consecration, the article casts light upon this particular ‘judging club’ and its practices, and illuminates ways in which researchers might consider, orientate, and carry out further research into processes of cultural consecration.
    • Diversity and opportunity in the UK media industries

      Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (2019-01-14)
    • ‘I didn’t know you could read': questioning the legitimacy of Kim Kardashian-West’s status as a cultural and literary intermediary

      Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (Brill, 2018-11-17)
      This paper considers the reactions to the announcement of the Kim Kardashian-West Book Klub and explores how this episode illustrated the perceived illegitimacy of celebrities like Kardashian-West, who are commonly associated with ‘lowbrow culture’, engaging with and discussing literature, an activity that has traditionally been seen as a middlebrow endeavour. The reactions to the Kardashian-West Book Klub not only reflect issues around the status of celebrities as cultural intermediaries but also bring to the fore historical principles that have questioned the intelligence and capabilities of women readers. This paper positions the Kim Kardashian-West Book Klub within the wider historical context of women readers and book clubs and considers the prestige, or lack thereof, of celebrities who try to be cultural and literary intermediaries. The paper also considers the Kardashian-West Book Klub in relation to other major celebrity book clubs and argues that such forays into literary culture are used by some celebrities to bolster their social and cultural capital, acting first and foremost as a branch of their personal brand identity, rather than as altruistic enterprises.
    • Why women don’t win literary awards: the saltire society literary awards and implicit stereotyping

      Marsden, Stevie; University of Leicester (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-01)
      The purpose of this analysis is to consider the Saltire Society’s Book of the Year and First Book of the Year Awards in relation to wider issues pertaining to media representations of Scottish literary and publishing culture. Through a statistical analysis of the Society’s Book of the Year and First Book of the Year shortlists and winners between 1988 and 2014, this examination shows the extent to which the Society’s Literary Awards reflect, as opposed to subvert, historic and existing gender imbalances in Scottish literary and publishing culture. Indeed, despite critics arguing that there was a change in tide in the late 1980s and early 1990s regarding the balance in gender representation in Scottish literature, this analysis suggests that Scotland’s book award culture, and in turn, literary culture more widely, remains dominated by men. Perceptions of the apparent ‘balancing’ of the gender disparity in Scottish writing do not align with the statistics discussed here, a fact further evidence by misconceptions held by members of the Society’s own Literary Awards judging panels. Accordingly, this article contends that such inconsistencies lend credence to the argument that the Society’s judges have participated in implicit stereotyping based upon culturally pervasive stereotypes’ that Scottish women writers play a ‘minor’ role in Scottish literary and publishing culture.
    • ‘Eating, sleeping, breathing, reading’: the zoella book club and the young woman reader in the 21st Century

      Branagh-Miscampbell, Maxine; Marsden, Stevie; University of Stirling; University of Leicester (Participations, 2019-05-01)
      This article considers the development and promotion of WH Smith’s Zoella Book Club and its success in developing an online community who share a reading experience through their engagement with the club. The Zoella Book Club is considered in relation to contemporary celebrity book club culture, as well as within an historical context that appraises the Zoella Book Club in terms of the construction and promotion of ideal(ised) notions of the young woman reader. Through its aesthetic, choice of books and rhetoric, the Zoella Book Club propagated, commodified, and ultimately perpetuated, highly feminised and domestic imagery to construct an image of the ideal woman reader in the twenty-first century.
    • Data-driven knowledge acquisition, validation, and transformation into HL7 Arden Syntax

      Hussain, Maqbool; Afzal, Muhammad; Ali, Taqdir; Ali, Rahman; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Jamshed, Arif; Lee, Sungyoung; Kang, Byeong Ho; Latif, Khalid; Kyung Hee University, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si 446-701, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2015-10-28)
      The objective of this study is to help a team of physicians and knowledge engineers acquire clinical knowledge from existing practices datasets for treatment of head and neck cancer, to validate the knowledge against published guidelines, to create refined rules, and to incorporate these rules into clinical workflow for clinical decision support. A team of physicians (clinical domain experts) and knowledge engineers adapt an approach for modeling existing treatment practices into final executable clinical models. For initial work, the oral cavity is selected as the candidate target area for the creation of rules covering a treatment plan for cancer. The final executable model is presented in HL7 Arden Syntax, which helps the clinical knowledge be shared among organizations. We use a data-driven knowledge acquisition approach based on analysis of real patient datasets to generate a predictive model (PM). The PM is converted into a refined-clinical knowledge model (R-CKM), which follows a rigorous validation process. The validation process uses a clinical knowledge model (CKM), which provides the basis for defining underlying validation criteria. The R-CKM is converted into a set of medical logic modules (MLMs) and is evaluated using real patient data from a hospital information system. We selected the oral cavity as the intended site for derivation of all related clinical rules for possible associated treatment plans. A team of physicians analyzed the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for the oral cavity and created a common CKM. Among the decision tree algorithms, chi-squared automatic interaction detection (CHAID) was applied to a refined dataset of 1229 patients to generate the PM. The PM was tested on a disjoint dataset of 739 patients, which gives 59.0% accuracy. Using a rigorous validation process, the R-CKM was created from the PM as the final model, after conforming to the CKM. The R-CKM was converted into four candidate MLMs, and was used to evaluate real data from 739 patients, yielding efficient performance with 53.0% accuracy. Data-driven knowledge acquisition and validation against published guidelines were used to help a team of physicians and knowledge engineers create executable clinical knowledge. The advantages of the R-CKM are twofold: it reflects real practices and conforms to standard guidelines, while providing optimal accuracy comparable to that of a PM. The proposed approach yields better insight into the steps of knowledge acquisition and enhances collaboration efforts of the team of physicians and knowledge engineers.
    • The mining minds digital health and wellness framework

      Banos, Oresti; Bilal Amin, Muhammad; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Afzal, Muhammad; Hussain, Maqbool; Kang, Byeong Ho; Lee, Sungyong; Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deokyoungdae-ro, Giheung-ug, Yongin-si, 446-701, Korea; University of Tasmania (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2016-07-15)
      The provision of health and wellness care is undergoing an enormous transformation. A key element of this revolution consists in prioritizing prevention and proactivity based on the analysis of people’s conducts and the empowerment of individuals in their self-management. Digital technologies are unquestionably destined to be the main engine of this change, with an increasing number of domain-specific applications and devices commercialized every year; however, there is an apparent lack of frameworks capable of orchestrating and intelligently leveraging, all the data, information and knowledge generated through these systems. This work presents Mining Minds, a novel framework that builds on the core ideas of the digital health and wellness paradigms to enable the provision of personalized support. Mining Minds embraces some of the most prominent digital technologies, ranging from Big Data and Cloud Computing to Wearables and Internet of Things, as well as modern concepts and methods, such as context-awareness, knowledge bases or analytics, to holistically and continuously investigate on people’s lifestyles and provide a variety of smart coaching and support services. This paper comprehensively describes the efficient and rational combination and interoperation of these technologies and methods through Mining Minds, while meeting the essential requirements posed by a framework for personalized health and wellness support. Moreover, this work presents a realization of the key architectural components of Mining Minds, as well as various exemplary user applications and expert tools to illustrate some of the potential services supported by the proposed framework. Mining Minds constitutes an innovative holistic means to inspect human behavior and provide personalized health and wellness support. The principles behind this framework uncover new research ideas and may serve as a reference for similar initiatives.
    • An adaptive semantic based mediation system for data interoperability among health information systems

      Khan, Wajahat Ali; Khattak, Asad Masood; Hussain, Maqbool; Amin, Muhammad Bilal; Afzal, Muhammad; Nugent, Christopher; Lee, Sungyoung; Kyung Hee University, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 446-701, Republic of Korea; University of Ulster Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2014-06-26)
      Heterogeneity in the management of the complex medical data, obstructs the attainment of data level interoperability among Health Information Systems (HIS). This diversity is dependent on the compliance of HISs with different healthcare standards. Its solution demands a mediation system for the accurate interpretation of data in different heterogeneous formats for achieving data interoperability. We propose an adaptive AdapteR Interoperability ENgine mediation system called ARIEN, that arbitrates between HISs compliant to different healthcare standards for accurate and seamless information exchange to achieve data interoperability. ARIEN stores the semantic mapping information between different standards in the Mediation Bridge Ontology (MBO) using ontology matching techniques. These mappings are provided by our System for Parallel Heterogeneity (SPHeRe) matching system and Personalized-Detailed Clinical Model (P-DCM) approach to guarantee accuracy of mappings. The realization of the effectiveness of the mappings stored in the MBO is evaluation of the accuracy in transformation process among different standard formats. We evaluated our proposed system with the transformation process of medical records between Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) and Virtual Medical Record (vMR) standards. The transformation process achieved over 90 % of accuracy level in conversion process between CDA and vMR standards using pattern oriented approach from the MBO. The proposed mediation system improves the overall communication process between HISs. It provides an accurate and seamless medical information exchange to ensure data interoperability and timely healthcare services to patients.
    • Multi-model-based interactive authoring environment for creating shareable medical knowledge

      Ali, Taqdir; Hussain, Maqbool; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Afzal, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamil; Ali, Rahman; Hassan, Waseem; Jamshed, Arif; Kang, Byeong Ho; Lee, Sungyoung; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2017-07-22)
      Technologically integrated healthcare environments can be realized if physicians are encouraged to use smart systems for the creation and sharing of knowledge used in clinical decision support systems (CDSS). While CDSSs are heading toward smart environments, they lack support for abstraction of technology-oriented knowledge from physicians. Therefore, abstraction in the form of a user-friendly and flexible authoring environment is required in order for physicians to create shareable and interoperable knowledge for CDSS workflows. Our proposed system provides a user-friendly authoring environment to create Arden Syntax MLM (Medical Logic Module) as shareable knowledge rules for intelligent decision-making by CDSS. Existing systems are not physician friendly and lack interoperability and shareability of knowledge. In this paper, we proposed Intelligent-Knowledge Authoring Tool (I-KAT), a knowledge authoring environment that overcomes the above mentioned limitations. Shareability is achieved by creating a knowledge base from MLMs using Arden Syntax. Interoperability is enhanced using standard data models and terminologies. However, creation of shareable and interoperable knowledge using Arden Syntax without abstraction increases complexity, which ultimately makes it difficult for physicians to use the authoring environment. Therefore, physician friendliness is provided by abstraction at the application layer to reduce complexity. This abstraction is regulated by mappings created between legacy system concepts, which are modeled as domain clinical model (DCM) and decision support standards such as virtual medical record (vMR) and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine - Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT). We represent these mappings with a semantic reconciliation model (SRM). The objective of the study is the creation of shareable and interoperable knowledge using a user-friendly and flexible I-KAT. Therefore we evaluated our system using completeness and user satisfaction criteria, which we assessed through the system- and user-centric evaluation processes. For system-centric evaluation, we compared the implementation of clinical information modelling system requirements in our proposed system and in existing systems. The results suggested that 82.05% of the requirements were fully supported, 7.69% were partially supported, and 10.25% were not supported by our system. In the existing systems, 35.89% of requirements were fully supported, 28.20% were partially supported, and 35.89% were not supported. For user-centric evaluation, the assessment criterion was ‘ease of use’. Our proposed system showed 15 times better results with respect to MLM creation time than the existing systems. Moreover, on average, the participants made only one error in MLM creation using our proposed system, but 13 errors per MLM using the existing systems. We provide a user-friendly authoring environment for creation of shareable and interoperable knowledge for CDSS to overcome knowledge acquisition complexity. The authoring environment uses state-of-the-art decision support-related clinical standards with increased ease of use.
    • Mapping evolution of dynamic web ontologies

      Khattak, A.M.; Pervez, Z.; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Khan, A.M.; Latif, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Zayed University, United Arab Emirates; University of the West of Scotland; Kyung Hee University, Republic of Korea; Innopolis University, Russia; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2015-01-03)
      Information on the web and web services that are revised by stakeholders is growing incredibly. The presentation of this information has shifted from a representational model of web information with loosely clustered terminology to semi-formal terminology and even to formal ontology. Mediation (i.e., mapping) is required for systems and services to share information. Mappings are established between ontologies in order to resolve terminological and conceptual incompatibilities. Due to new discoveries in the field of information sharing, the body of knowledge has become more structured and refined. The domain ontologies that represent bodies of knowledge need to be able to accommodate new information. This allows for the ontology to evolve from one consistent state to another. Changes in resources cause existing mappings between ontologies to be unreliable and stale. This highlights the need for mapping evolution (regeneration) as it would eliminate the discrepancies from the existing mappings. In order to re-establish the mappings between dynamic ontologies, the existing systems require a complete mapping process to be restructured, and this process is time consuming. This paper proposes a mapping reconciliation approach between the updated ontologies that has been found to take less time to process compared to the time of existing systems when only the changed resources are considered and also eliminates the staleness of the existing mappings. The proposed approach employs the change history of ontology in order to store the ontology change information, which helps to drastically reduce the reconciliation time of the mappings between dynamic ontologies. A comprehensive evaluation of the performance of the proposed system on standard data sets has been conducted. The experimental results of the proposed system in comparison with six existing mapping systems are provided in this paper using 13 different data sets, which support our claims.
    • Laughter and humour for personal development: A systematic scoping review of the evidence

      Gonot-Schoupinsky, Freda N.; Garip, Gulcan; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-05-23)
      The accessibility of laughter and humour make them attractive choices for self-care, and integrative medicine. There is a growing body of literature, but both fields are fragmented and the overall evidence has not been systematically reviewed. The relationship between health and personal development is increasingly recognized. This review scopes the evidence for laughter and humour interventions from the perspective of their potential benefits on personal development. A systematic scoping review used Joanna Briggs guidelines and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews Scoping Review extension (PRISMA-ScR). All-population laughter and humour interventions described in primary and secondary research from 1970, and in English, were searched in Web of Science and PubMed/Medline. Analysis of 240 primary research articles (k), and 11 systematic reviews (K), identified k = 564 discrete articles with studies involving 574,611 participants (n). Twelve large studies (n >15,000) contributed 77% of participants. Classification analysis found more research relating to humour (k = 445, n = 334,996) than laughter (k = 119, n = 239,615) and identified diverse personal development outcomes associated with Biological, Psychological, Social, Environmental, and Behavioural (BPSE-B) factors. This review presents growing evidence for the diverse applications and benefits of laughter and humour. Multiple opportunities for self-care and interventional applications are described. The consideration of personal development outcomes may support tailored applications according to specific needs and objectives. An umbrella Personal Development Theory of laughter and humour, inclusive humour and laughter definitions, and a humour-laughter-affect model are proposed to unify the fields.
    • Derby city joint cultural needs analysis for the derby creative arts network and reimagine projects

      Nunn, Alexander; Turner, Royce; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2020-02)
    • Vocational teachers and workplace learning: integrative, complementary and implicit accounts of boundary crossing

      Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-05-25)
      Where young people’s upper-secondary education spans work and institutional domains, questions arise about learning across both spheres and its guidance. Theoretical accounts of ‘boundary crossing’ have explored how vocational teachers can integrate learning across domains by drawing on extended concepts and theoretical knowledge to solve workplace problems; whilst empirical accounts have validated the role of vocational educators by describing the workplace and schools as equally valid, complementary spheres. Different understandings, described here as ‘integrative’, ‘complementary’ and ‘implicit’, appear to reflect different national patterns of vocational education. The paper reports a qualitative study conducted around two case studies, located in Germany and England, of the way vocational teachers’ understandings of facilitating learning across domains are constructed. Vocational teachers working in Germany’s ‘dual training’ claimed to provide advanced knowledge that they compared to practical work skills, reflecting ‘implicit’ or ‘complementary’ approaches to learning across domains. Teachers in England, where workplace learning elements are more unevenly developed and lack institutional foundations, nevertheless described colleges and workplaces as distinctive, little-connected spheres. These differences suggest that teachers’ approaches are less shaped by the potential or necessity for ‘integrative’ approaches than by the way different systems enable or constrain their conceptualisation of ‘possible futures’.
    • Calibration and cross-validation of accelerometery for estimating movement skills in children aged 8–12 years

      Duncan, MJ; Dobell, A; Noon, M; Clark, CT; Roscoe, CMP; Stodden, D; Sacko, R; Eyre, ELJ; Faghy, Mark; Coventry University; et al. (MDPI, 2020-05-13)
      This study sought to calibrate triaxial accelerometery, worn on both wrists, waist and both ankles, during children’s physical activity (PA), with particular attention to object control motor skills performed at a fast and slow cadence, and to cross-validate the accelerometer cut-points derived from the calibration using an independent dataset. Twenty boys (10.1 ±1.5 years) undertook seven, five-minute bouts of activity lying supine, standing, running (4.5kmph−1) instep passing a football (fast and slow cadence), dribbling a football (fast and slow cadence), whilst wearing five GENEActiv accelerometers on their non-dominant and dominant wrists and ankles and waist. VO2 was assessed concurrently using indirect calorimetry. ROC curve analysis was used to generate cut-points representing sedentary, light and moderate PA. The cut-points were then cross-validated using independent data from 30 children (9.4 ± 1.4 years), who had undertaken similar activities whilst wearing accelerometers and being assessed for VO2. GENEActiv monitors were able to discriminate sedentary activity to an excellent level irrespective of wear location. For moderate PA, discrimination of activity was considered good for monitors placed on the dominant wrist, waist, non-dominant and dominant ankles but fair for the non-dominant wrist. Applying the cut-points to the cross-validation sample indicated that cut-points validated in the calibration were able to successfully discriminate sedentary behaviour and moderate PA to an excellent standard and light PA to a fair standard. Cut-points derived from this calibration demonstrate an excellent ability to discriminate children’s sedentary behaviour and moderate intensity PA comprising motor skill activity.
    • Development and psychometric evaluation of the Birmingham Relationship Continuity Measure for acquired brain injury

      Yasmin, Natasha; Keeble, Hayley; Riley, Gerard; University of Birmingham (Taylor and Francis, 2020-05-23)
      Relationship continuity/discontinuity refers to whether a spouse/partner experiences their current relationship with someone with an acquired brain injury (ABI) as a continuation of their loving pre-injury relationship or as radically changed. The aim of this study was to adapt a questionnaire measure of continuity/discontinuity from dementia research for use in an ABI context and to evaluate the psychometric properties of this adaptation. The questionnaire was adapted in response to feedback from a focus group of ABI caregivers. Its psychometric properties were then evaluated in two studies involving partners of people with ABI. The measure showed high internal consistency (alpha = .956 in Study 1 and .963 in Study 2), test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation = .960 in Study 1) and discriminative power (Ferguson’s delta = .975 in Study 1 and .963 in Study 2). Evidence of construct validity was provided by a predicted pattern of correlations with other relationship questionnaires. Exploratory factor analysis suggested that the questionnaire is unidimensional. A valid and reliable quantitative measure of relationship continuity/discontinuity will enable more robust evaluation of suggestions about this construct that have been made in qualitative studies (e.g. that discontinuity is associated with a greater sense of caregiver burden).