Now showing items 1-20 of 5398

    • Measuring actions for nature—development and validation of a pro-nature conservation behaviour scale

      Barbett, Lea; Stupple, Edward; Sweet, Michael; Schofield, Malcolm; Richardson, Miles; University of Derby (MDPI, 2020-06-15)
      Scientists have classed the ongoing decline in biodiversity—caused by humans—as a mass extinction. To mitigate the consequences of this extinction, immediate action is of the utmost importance. However, effective ways of promoting pro-nature conservation behaviours to preserve and enhance biodiversity require better understanding and measurement. Thus, a reliable and valid measurement tool is needed. While there are measurement tools for general pro-environmental behaviours, as of yet, no measure of behaviours that specifically promote biodiversity exists. Here, we present such a tool: the Pro-Nature Conservation Behaviour Scale (ProCoBS), a psychometrically validated questionnaire scale measuring active behaviours that specifically support the conservation of biodiversity. An item pool developed through consultation with wildlife and biodiversity experts was subjected to psychometric scale development analyses. Data from 300 participants were used to develop the 18-item ProCoBS long form, as well as an 8-item short form. A latent variable model with four factors (Individual Engagement, Social Engagement, Planting, and Wildlife) was identified. In a second study, a subset of 250 of the original participants answered the questionnaire again, in addition to related psychological constructs. The data were used to assess test–retest reliability and construct validity. Results showed that the scale and its short form were reliable (full scale: α = 0.893, short form: α = 0.825) and valid. In a third study, a representative sample of 1298 adults in the UK completed the short form. Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated a good fit for all factors, indicating that the ProCoBS is a psychometrically robust measure. The ProCoBS provides the definitive, much needed tool for measuring conservation behaviours. This will enhance research and impact practical work in the conservation domain for a sustainable future. A cross-cultural examination of the scale is still needed. View Full-Text
    • Organisational learning and industry 4.0: Findings from a systematic literature review and research agenda

      Belinski, Ricardo; Peixe, Adriana M.M.; Frederico, Guilherme F.; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil; University of Derby (Emerald, 2020-07-06)
      Industry 4.0 has been one of the most topic of interest by researches and practitioners in recent years. Then, researches which bring new insights related to the subjects linked to the Industry 4.0 become relevant to support Industry 4.0’s initiatives as well as for the deployment of new research works. Considering “Organisational Learning” as one of the most crucial subjects in this new context, this article aims to identify dimensions present in the literature regarding the relation between Organisational Learning and Industry 4.0 seeking to clarify how learning can be understood into the context of the fourth industrial revolution. In addition, future research directions are presented as well. This study is based on a systematic literature review (SLR) that covers Industry 4.0 and Organisational Learning based on publications made from 2012, when the topic of Industry 4.0 was coined in Germany, using as data basis Web of Science and Google Scholar. Also, Nvivo software was used in order to identify keywords and the respective dimensions and constructs found out on this research. Nine dimensions were identified between Organisational Learning and Industry 4.0. These include Management, Industry 4.0, General Industry, Technology, Sustainability, Application, Interaction between Industry and the Academia, Education and Training, and Competency and Skills. These dimensions may be viewed in three main constructs which are essentially in order to understand and manage Learning in Industry 4.0’s programs. They are: Learning Development, Industry 4.0 Structure and Technology Adoption. Even though there are relatively few publications that have studied the relationship between Organisational Learning and Industry 4.0, this article makes a material contribution to both the theory in relation to Industry 4.0 and the theory of learning - for its unprecedented nature, introducing the dimensions comprising this relation as well as possible future research directions encouraging empirical researches. This article identifies the thematic dimensions relative to Industry 4.0 and Organisational Learning. The understanding of this relation has a relevant contribution to professionals acting in the field of Organisational Learning and Industry 4.0 in the sense of affording an adequate deployment of these elements by organisations. This article is unique for filling a gap in the academic literature in terms of understanding the relation between Organisational Learning and Industry 4.0. The article also provides future research directions on learning within the context of Industry 4.0.
    • Underestimation of COVID-19 cases in Japan: an analysis of RT-PCR testing for COVID-19 among 47 prefectures in Japan

      Sawano, Toyoaki; Kotera, Yasuhiro; Ozaki, Akihiko; Murayama, Anju; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Sah, Ranjit; Wang, Jiwei; Fukushima Medical University, Japan; University of Derby; Tohoku University, Japan; et al. (Oxford University Press, 2020-06-19)
      Under the unique Japanese policy to restrict reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, a nationwide number of its confirmed cases and mortality remains to be low. Yet the information is lacking on geographical differences of these measures and their associated factors. Evaluation of prefecture-based geographical differences and associated predictors for the incidence and number of RT-PCR tests for COVID-19. Cross-sectional study using regression and correlation analysis. We retrieved domestic laboratory-confirmed cases, deaths, and the number of RT-PCR testing for COVID-19 from January 15 to April 6, 2020 in 47 prefectures in Japan, using publicly-available data by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. We did descriptive analyses of these three measures and identified significant predictors for the incidence and RT-PCR testing through multiple regression analyses and correlates with the number of deaths through correlation analysis. The median prefectural-level incidence and number of RT-PCR testing per 100,000 population were 1.14 and 38.6, respectively. Multiple regression analyses revealed that significant predictors for the incidence were prefectural-level population (p < 0.001) and the number of RT-PCR testing (p = 0.03); and those for RT-PCR testing were the incidence (p = 0.025), available beds (p = 0.045) and cluster infections (p = 0.034). Considering bidirectional association between the incidence and RT-PCR testing, there may have been an underdiagnosed population for the infection. The restraint policy for RT-PCR testing should be revisited to meet the increasing demand under the COVID-19 epidemic.
    • Dependence structure in the Australian electricity markets: New evidence from regular vine copulae

      Apergis, Nicholas; Gozgor, Giray; Lau, Chi Keung; Wang, Shixuan; University of Derby; Istanbul Medeniyet University; University of Huddersfield; University of Reading (Elsevier, 2020-07-01)
      In this study, regular vine copula was used to investigate the dependence structure of electricity prices at the state level in the Australian National Electricity Market (NEM), during three periods related to the adoption and abolition of the carbon tax. In the pre-carbon period, we found evidence of tail dependence separately in the northern and southern NEM, but not across them. During the carbon period, the joint spike in the northern NEM disappeared, and the tail dependence in the southern NEM decreased. In the post-carbon period, the best dependence structure turned out to be a flexible structure of the regular vine, which exactly matches the geographical infrastructure connectedness of transmission wires. Besides, both upper and lower tail dependences were found in all adjacent states after the abolition of the carbon tax, suggesting a more integrated market regarding tail dependence. Our findings have substantial implications for risk management in the NEM, especially for those participants exposed to multiple states.
    • Greenhouse gas emissions convergence in Spain: Evidence from the club clustering approach

      Apergis, Nicholas; Garzón, Antonio; University of Derby; University of Seville (Springer, 2020-07-05)
      This study examines the convergence of greenhouse gas emissions per capita across the 19 Spanish regions using the Phillips-Sul club convergence approach over the period spanning from 1990 to 2017. The results indicate the existence of 3 clubs which converge to different equilibria and correspond to the same convergence clubs in terms of income per capita. These findings suggest that mitigation policies should take into account the existence of different clubs of regions with different convergence paths in terms of emissions.
    • Do fiscal shocks explain bond yield in high and low debt economies

      Apergis, Nicholas; Rehman, Mobeen; Cooray, Arusha; University of Derby; Ton Duc Thang University; Embassy of Sri Lanka, Oslo, Norway (Emerald, 2020-06-29)
      The goal of this paper is to explore determinants of short-, medium- and long-run bond yields through time series data analysis for 11 developed countries, with five of them being high-debt and remaining as the low-debt economies. By applying variance decomposition using structural vector autoregression (SVAR) model, empirical findings confirm an important role of demand and supply factors that drive the interest rates across their frequency spectrum. Our results also highlight that for interest rates of different maturities, these factors exhibit heterogeneous behavior across high- and low-debt countries during the pre- and post-crisis regimes.
    • Digital warp blue part of silken threads exhibition

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (2014-10-24)
    • Invent-re-invent-Itajime: barcode I, II, II

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (2014-06-21)
      Today there is an ever-increasing demand for printed fabrics to exhibit an ethnic twist or provide the impression of being hand produced. Some of the reasons for this may be due to a merging of cultures, through increased travel and advances in communications but there is also a growing trend in the importance of identity, place and individualism that has created a renewed interest in craft, one-off and hand produced products. An increasing desire for the unique and traditional: In-praise of the ‘hand’; ‘flaw’; ‘accident’ has potentially resulted in a growth of digital representations of traditional designs, many originating through painterly, dyed or hand printed techniques that produce marks upon or within the cloth that act as indicators of the technique employed and as such exhibit irregularity with the occasional fault implying the influence of the ‘hand’ in its production. The digitisation of traditionally patterned materials that are seemingly too expensive to still be produced by hand has enabled such design styles to enter into the marketplace. But this re-production, copying process of traditional designs using the new technologies of the time is historic, having taken place within Europe since the C18th with the birth of textile printing manufacture, so what makes digitisation of the process any different from a traditional copy? Hopefully successful digitisation of a design helps retain some of the qualities of ‘Slow’ production allowing reproduction of one-off pieces to be successfully digitally printed, even re-coloured. But many questions still remain: ‘Can digital copy with extensive CAD re-working retain the quality of ‘hand’ and ‘accident’ and continue to deliver the magical qualities, depth of colour and uniqueness that hand dyed and printed textiles exhibit?’ or ‘Can ‘hand’ and ‘technology’ unite together in creating a new, unique form of digital copy in the future?
    • Digital warp blue

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (2015-11-04)
    • Shibori: digital intervention

      Wells, Kate; University of Derby (2020-03-04)
      Digital Copy: The Uniting of Hand and Technology. Today there is an ever-increasing demand for printed fabrics to exhibit an ethnic twist or provide the impression of being hand produced. Some of the reasons for this may be due to a merging of cultures, through increased travel and advances in communications but there is also a growing trend in the importance of identity, place and individualism that has created a renewed interest in craft, one-off and hand produced products. An increasing desire for the unique and traditional: In-praise of the ‘hand’; ‘flaw’; ‘accident’ has potentially resulted in a growth of digital representations of traditional designs, many originating through painterly, dyed or hand printed techniques that produce marks upon or within the cloth that act as indicators of the technique employed and as such exhibit irregularity with the occasional fault implying the influence of the ‘hand’ in its production. The digitisation of traditionally patterned materials that are seemingly too expensive to still be produced by hand has enabled such design styles to enter into the marketplace. But this re-production, copying process of traditional designs using the new technologies of the time is historic, having taken place within Europe since the C18th with the birth of textile printing manufacture, so what makes digitisation of the process any different from a traditional copy? Hopefully successful digitisation of a design helps retain some of the qualities of ‘Slow’ production allowing reproduction of one-off pieces to be successfully digitally printed, even re-coloured. But many questions still remain: ‘Can digital copy with extensive CAD re-working retain the quality of ‘hand’ and ‘accident’ and continue to deliver the magical qualities, depth of colour and uniqueness that hand dyed and printed textiles exhibit?’ or ‘Can ‘hand’ and ‘technology’ unite together in creating a new, unique form of digital copy in the future?
    • Local community support in tourism in Mauritius – ray of light by LUX*

      Ramkissoon, Haywantee; Sowamber, Vishnee; University of Derby, UK; UiT, The Arctic University of Norway; Monash University, Australia; University of Johannesburg, South Africa (Routledge, 2020-11-30)
      Tourism development is said to be a priority sector for economic growth within Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), generating employment and foreign investment to these countries (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2011a; b). SIDS also face fierce competition in maintaining their positioning competing with not only existing competitors but also with emerging destinations (Ramkissoon & Uysal, 2011; 2018; Seetaram & Joubert, 2018). Local communities have great expectations from the tourism industry as a source of employment, and they tend to be in support of tourism development in their country (Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2013). However, the local people also get impacted by adverse impacts from tourist activities including waste production, land use and depletion of resources (water, land, marine) (Kim, Uysal, & Sirgy, 2013; Ramkissoon & Durbarry, 2009). Further, local cultures might not always be well grasped by non-locals who work in the tourism sector. While many value diversity, some may tend to impose their own cultures at destinations if they are not well sensitized on respecting the local culture. An important remark in SIDS is that the employment salary provided to the locals is very often just enough for survival. It is a sector which operates 24/7, with work shifts comprising of odd hours, weekends, and public holidays. Tourism workers very often experience burnout if they do not have a manager who fuels them with motivation (Andereck & Nyaupane, 2011). To be able to sustain growth, tourism operators need to ensure that they are creating adequate value within the local community and for this, the local residents’ participation is important (Hwang, Chi & Lee, 2013). The tourism sector has the opportunity to demonstrate sustainable development through implementation of initiatives which involves stakeholder engagement and participation (Byrd, Ca´rdenas, & Greenwood, 2008; Nunkoo & Ramkissoon, 2017). This chapter uses the Mauritian hotel group LUX* Resorts and Hotels as a case study and discusses the ‘Ray of Light’ social initiative as part of its sustainable tourism development strategy. It further discusses strategies practitioners and policy-makers need to consider to promote sustainability at their organizations embracing tourism as an instrument for positive change.
    • A feasibility study of non-invasive continuous estimation of brachial pressure derived from arterial and venous lines during dialysis

      Stewart, Jill; Walker, Thomas; Eldehini, Tarek; Horner, Daniela Viramontes; Lucas, Bethany; White, Kelly; Muggleton, Andy; Selby, Nicholas M; Taal, Martin W; Stewart, Paul; et al. (IEEE, 2020)
      Intradialytic haemodynamic instability is a significant clinical problem, leading to end-organ ischaemia and contributing to morbidity and mortality in haemodialysis patients. Non-invasive continuous blood pressure monitoring is not part of routine practice but may aid detection and prevention of significant falls in blood pressure during dialysis. Brachial blood pressure is currently recorded intermittently during haemodialysis via a sphygmomanometer. Current methods of continuous non-invasive blood pressure monitoring tend to restrict movement, can be sensitive to external disturbances and patient movement, and can be uncomfortable for the wearer. Additionally, poor patient blood circulation can lead to unreliable measurements. In this study we performed an initial validation of a novel method and associated technology via a feasibility study to continuously estimate blood pressure using pressure sensors in the extra-corporeal dialysis circuit, which does not require any direct contact with the person receiving dialysis treatment.\\ The paper describes the development of the measurement system and subsequent \emph{in vivo} patient feasibility study with concurrent measurement validation by \emph{Finapres Nova} experimental physiological measurement device. We identify a mathematical function to describe the relationship between arterial line pressure and brachial artery BP, which is confirmed in the patient study. The methodology presented requires no interfacing to proprietery dialysis machine systems, no sensors to be attached to the patient directly, and to be robust to patient movement during treatment and also to the effects of the cyclical pressure waveforms induced by the hemodialysis pump. This represents a key enabling factor to the development of a practical continuous blood pressure monitoring device for dialysis patients.
    • Privacy-preserving crowd-sensed trust aggregation in the user-centeric internet of people networks

      Azad, Muhammad; Perera, Charith; Bag, Samiran; Barhamgi, Mahmoud; Hao, Feng; University of Derby; Cardiff University; University of Warwick; Universite Claude Bernard Lyon (ACM, 2020)
      Today we are relying on the Internet technologies for various types of services ranging from personal communication to the entertainment. The online social networks (Facebook, twitter, youtube) has seen an increase in subscribers in recent years developing a social network among people termed as the Internet of People. In such a network, subscribers use the content disseminated by other subscribers. The malicious users can also utilize such platforms for spreading the malicious and fake content that would bring catastrophic consequences to a social network if not identified on time. People crowd-sensing on the Internet of people system has seen a prospective solution for the large scale data collection by leveraging the feedback collections from the people of the internet that would not only help in identifying malicious subscribers of the network but would also help in defining better services. However, the human involvement in crowd-sensing would have challenges of privacy-preservation, intentional spread of false high score about certain user/content undermining the services, and assigning different trust scores to the peoples of the network without disclosing their trust weights. Therefore, having a privacy-preserving system for computing trust of people and their content in the network would play a crucial role in collecting high-quality data from the people. In this paper, a novel trust model is proposed for evaluating the trust of the people in the social network without compromising the privacy of the participating people. The proposed systems have inherent properties of the trust weight assignment to a different class of user i.e. it can assign different weights to different users of the network, has decentralized setup, and ensures privacy properties under the malicious and honest but curious adversarial model. We evaluated the performance of the system by developing a prototype and applying it to different online social network dataset.
    • 'fancys or feelings': John Clare's hypochondriac poetics

      Lafford, Erin; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020-09-18)
      Clare’s mental and physical health has long been a source of interest and contention in his critical reception. Approaches to his ‘madness’ have ranged from retroactive diagnoses of bipolar disorder, to interrogations of insanity as a discourse of clinical power. If the result of these debates is that critics are more willing to read pathology as performance, or even to suggest that Clare’s disorder might not have been straightforwardly ‘real’, then this essay asks what can be gained from returning to some fleeting claims about the poet’s mental and physical health that express a struggle between reality and imagination, but have not yet received sufficient attention. I refer here to suggestions, both from his contemporary moment and from his subsequent critical reception, that Clare was a hypochondriac. Clare has been overlooked in critical conversations that discuss the significance of hypochondria as a facet of the Romantic medical imagination and cultivation of ‘fashionable disease’ but, as I hope to show, hypochondria should be taken seriously as a conceptual lens through which to read his poetic imagination in relation to illness and disorder. Hypochondria occupies a distinct interpretative space of uncertainty and of literary associations that, this essay argues, is better able to approach Clare on his own terms. I consider hypochondria in two interrelated ways: as a social and literary culture that Clare wanted to participate in and that also framed some of his writing, and as a form of poetic imagination and attention that emerged from Clare’s anxious scrutiny of his own body and mind. I also explore, through a final reading of a sonnet Clare published in the London Magazine in 1821, how hypochondria can become an important lens through which to consider his lyric subjectivity, uncovering as it does the ambiguously pathological experiences or registers that might disrupt his observation of the natural world.
    • Turning motivation into action: A strategic orientation model for green supply chain management

      Liu, Shumin; Eweje, Gabriel; He, Qile; Lin, Zhibin; Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, China; Massey University, New Zealand; University of Derby, United Kingdom; Durham University, United Kingdom (Wiley, 2020-07-03)
      This study examines the key motivations for a firm to adopt green supply chain management (GSCM) strategic orientation, and the mechanisms that subsequently influence GSCM practices. Three components of GSCM orientation were examined, i.e. strategic emphasis, management support, and resource commitment. Data were collected from a sample of 296 manufacturing firms in China. The results indicate that the most important motivation is environmental concern, followed by customer requirements, cost saving and competitive pressure, while legal requirements were not a significant factor. The results confirm that strategic orientation plays mediating role between motivations and the actual practices. Within the three components of strategic orientation, resource commitment and strategic emphasis have stronger direct impact on practices, whereas the effect of management support on GSCM practices is indirect through resource commitment. This study contributes to the literature by clarifying the key role of strategic orientation in turning GSCM motivations into actions.
    • Practical implications and future research agenda of lean manufacturing: a systematic literature review

      Antony, J; Psomas, E; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Hines, P; Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh; University of Patras, Greece; University of Derby; Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland (Taylor & Francis, 2020-06-29)
      Academic literature on Lean Manufacturing (LM) is widely available. However, due to its fragmentation, the contribution of LM from practical and academic perspectives is controversial. This paper establishes the practical implications of LM studies carried out worldwide and identifies novel research streams. A Systematic Literature Review (SLR) of peer-reviewed journal articles was conducted. A total of 401 articles published in 61 journals during 2010-2019 were collected from four major management science publishers. An “affinity diagram” was applied to organize the data into natural and logical themes. Conceptual frameworks concerning LM practical implications and future research agenda were formulated. Meaningful themes of LM practical implications and future research suggestions were revealed and classified into two categories. In category one pertaining to the internal nature of LM, themes related to the pre-implementation, implementation and post-implementation phases of LM were identified. In category two pertaining to the external nature of LM, themes related to the country in which the companies operate, the diverse managerial systems available, and the methodological research approach were identified. The main themes supported in the literature by most references were determined. Finally, respective statements concerning the practical implications of LM and the future research agenda are analytically presented.
    • An illness-specific version of the revised illness perception questionnaire in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF-IPQR): Unpacking beliefs about treatment control, personal control and symptom triggers

      Taylor, Elaina C; O'Neill, Mark; Hughes, Lyndsay D; Moss-Morris, Rona; King's College London (Routledge, 2017-09-11)
      This study modified the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) in patients with persistent Atrial Fibrillation (AF). Qualitative interviews and think-aloud techniques informed modification of the IPQ-R to be specific to AF patients. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) (n=198) examined the validity of the modified IPQ-R (AF-IPQ-R). Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) examined the new AF-triggers scale. Construct validity examined associations between the AF-IPQ-R, quality of life (QoL) and beliefs about medicines. Test-retest and internal reliability were examined. Interviews indicated that patients viewed triggers of AF rather than initial causes of illness as more applicable. Patients believed specific behaviours such as rest could control AF. Treatment control beliefs related to pharmacological and procedural treatments. These data were used to modify the IPQ-R subscales and to develop a triggers of AF scale. CFA indicated good model fit. EFA of the triggers scale indicated 3 factors: emotional; health behaviours; and over-exertion triggers. Expected correlations were found between the AF-IPQ-R, QoL and treatment beliefs, evidencing good construct validity. The AF-IPQ-R showed sound psychometric properties. It provides more detailed specification than the IPQ-R of beliefs that may help to understand poor QoL in AF patients, and guidance for future interventions in this area.
    • El enfoque mosaico, derecho a la participación y la voz de los niños en investigación educativa

      Delgado-Fuentes, Marco Antonio; University of Derby (Universidad CESMAG, 2020-06-11)
      This review article explores and discusses some of the methodological in-novations regarding childhood and education by focusing on the mosaic approach. It is a methodological approach -not constituted as a method yet- which has been mainly developed in English and it is founded on concepts such as those of qualitative research, childhood studies, the rights of the child and particularly, their right to participate in research about themselves and their world. A historical framework is presented to facilitate the understanding of the multidisciplinary origins of this approach. The process of the literature review was made in a database that contained 71 million references, out of which 28 references, which identified the mosaic approach as their method, were selected. The analysis of this approach presents a diverse panorama in its use, although it mainly focuses on preschool and early education. To conclude, a reflection about the use of this approach in the future is made and, particularly in Latin America where the incipient use of the mosaic approach seems to be relevant.
    • Surveillance of modern motherhood: Experiences of universal parenting courses

      Simmons, Helen; University of Derby (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020-08-23)
      This book explores the reflections and experiences of mothers of children aged 0-3 years that have attended universal parenting courses. Simmons considers the factors that motivated mothers to attend a universal parenting course and explore the wider experiences of early modern motherhood in the UK. She investigates participants' perceptions of benefits of attending a parenting course, different forms of parenting advice accessed by mothers, and how this provides an insight into the wider constructs and experiences of modern motherhood. Ultimately, the book considers, through a feminist post-structuralist lens, the social and cultural pressures within modern motherhood in relation to different levels of surveillance, and produces new knowledge for practice within the early years and health sectors in relation to the support currently offered to new mothers. It will be of interest to students and scholars across the sociology of education, gender studies, and childhood studies.
    • Rapid assembly of high-Mg andesites and dacites by magma mixing at a continental arc stratovolcano

      Conway, Chris; Chamberlain, Katy J.; Harigane, Yumiko; Morgan, Daniel; Wilson, Colin; Research Institute of Earthquake and Volcano Geology, Japan; National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; University of Derby; University of Leeds; Victoria University of Wellington (The Geological Society of America, 2020-06-25)
      Studies of pre-eruptive processes at active volcanoes require precise petrochronological constraints if they are to contribute to hazard assessment during future eruption events. We present petrological and geochemical data, and orthopyroxene diffusion timescales for samples from late Pleistocene high-Mg andesite dacite lavas (Mg#53–69) at Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand, as a case study of rapid magma genesis and eruption at a continental arc stratovolcano. Assembly of Ruapehu high-Mg magmas involved the mixing of primitive magmas plus entrained mantle equilibrated olivines with mid-crustal felsic mush bodies, yielding hybridized magmas with ubiquitous pyroxene reverse-zoning patterns. Orthopyroxene Fe-Mg interdiffusion timescales linked to quantitative crystal orientation data show that most lavas erupted <10 days after resumption of crystal growth following magma mixing events. The eruption of lavas within days of mixing events implies that pre-eruptive warnings may be correspondingly short.