Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Daithí
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-09T16:34:08Z
dc.date.available2021-11-09T16:34:08Z
dc.date.issued2021-10-01
dc.identifier.citationMcMahon, D. (2021). 'Holding Their Own: How Line of Duty offers the BBC a competitive edge in an increasingly crowded mediascape' [Presentation]. Television Histories in Development Conference, Hilversum, 30 September - 1 October.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/626083
dc.description.abstractThe British Broadcasting Corporation’s (BBC) hit television series Line of Duty (2012-present) is the envy of every UK broadcaster and international streaming service alike, attracting enormous audiences and near universal critical acclaim. A number of factors have contributed to the success of BBC television dramas and have helped the organisation garner large audiences and thus remain relevant to a modern audience bombarded by numerous viewing platforms, countless titles and ever-present distractions and competition from social media and podcasting. Whereas commercial television networks are motivated to commodify audiences up to, and sometimes beyond saturation, PSBs can take a more artistically focused approach that serves to benefit the programme and audience first which leads to a better product. Another key factor is the social aspect afforded by synchronous TV viewing by the audience and the ‘second screening’ that goes with this live practice (Doughty, 2012; Proulx, 2012). This allows audiences to interact online before, during and after live broadcasts thus connect viewers and create online virtual communities (Rheingold, 2000). This communal experience can have a social bonding (Putnam, 2000) effect and help build a loyal following week after week – a lost tradition in an age of series dumps and binge watching. The author argues that in the modern highly competitive mediascape the BBC must take note of the factors that have contributed to their past and recent successes and work to replicate these in their future programming strategies. The BBC must also go one step further however, and attract the younger generations of viewers who represent the future Television License Fee payers. Through textual analysis of successful television programmes including Lost (2000-2006), The Office (2005-2006), Bodyguard (2018) and Line of Duty (2012-present), among others, this paper draws on examples of historical successes to chart a path for the future of BBC Television drama programming.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.beeldengeluid.nl/en/visit/events/television-histories-developmenten_US
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectBBCen_US
dc.subjectLine of Dutyen_US
dc.subjectTV audienceen_US
dc.subjectonline communitiesen_US
dc.subjectaudience engagementen_US
dc.subjectpolice dramaen_US
dc.subjectBritish television dramaen_US
dc.subjectmedia consumptionen_US
dc.subjectmultiscreeningen_US
dc.subjectconvergence cultureen_US
dc.titleHolding Their Own: How Line of Duty offers the BBC a competitive edge in an increasingly crowded mediascapeen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-05-25
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-09T16:34:09Z
dc.author.detail785095en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TV Histories Conference Progra ...
Size:
1.814Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Conference Programme
Thumbnail
Name:
Screenshot 2021-11-02 at 17.00 ...
Size:
169.1Kb
Format:
PNG image
Description:
Image

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

CC0 1.0 Universal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC0 1.0 Universal