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dc.contributor.authorTronco Hernández, Yessica Abigail
dc.contributor.authorFabio, Parente
dc.contributor.authorFaghy, Mark
dc.contributor.authorRoscoe, Clare M. P.
dc.contributor.authorMaratos, Frances A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-22T08:36:08Z
dc.date.available2021-10-22T08:36:08Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationTronco Hernández, Y., A., Parente, F., Faghy, M. A., Roscoe, C., M., P., and Maratos, F. A. (2021). 'Influence of the COVID-19 Lockdown on the Physical and Psychosocial Well-being and Work Productivity of Remote Workers: Cross-sectional Correlational Study'. JMIRx Med. (In press).en_US
dc.identifier.issn2563-6316
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/30708
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/626045
dc.description.abstractBackground: Lockdowns imposed during the COVID-19 pandemic have impacted the living and working habits of millions of people, with potentially important implications for their physical, mental, and social well-being. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on remote workers who were not directly affected by COVID-19. Methods: This was a correlational cross-sectional study (with an additional qualitative component) of 184 remote workers surveyed during the first COVID-19 lockdown in the United Kingdom. Standard measures of mental health (Kessler-6 Distress Scale), productivity (Brief Instrument to Assess Workers’ Productivity During a Working Day), and physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire) were used, and respondents were further surveyed on changes to their dietary, exercise, smoking, drinking, and socialization habits to produce a well-being change index. Results: The results revealed associations between sedentary behavior and poorer mental health (τb=0.14) and between poorer mental health and low work productivity (τb=–0.39). However, both positive and negative lifestyle changes were reported; a self-reported increase in well-being (with respect to diet, exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, and socialization) since the start of the pandemic was associated with both better mental health (τb=–0.14) and better work productivity (τb=0.14). Of note, among respondents without a mental health diagnosis (137/184, 74.4%), we observed rates of moderate (76/137, 55.5%) and severe (17/137, 12.4%) psychological distress, which were markedly higher than those reported in large prepandemic studies; moreover, 70.1% (129/184) of our respondents reported more sedentary behavior, 41% (129/168) increased their alcohol consumption, and 38.6% (71/184) increased their overall food intake. However, 46% (75/163), 44.8% (39/87) and 51.8% (57/110) of respondents reported spending more time walking and engaging in more moderate and vigorous exercise, respectively. Qualitative analysis revealed many positive adaptations to lockdowns (eg, decreased commuting expenses, flexibility) but also a number of structural obstacles to remote working (eg, lack of support and high expectations from employers, childcare duties). Conclusions: These findings may be of practical importance for policy makers and employers in a world in which work involves long-term remote or hybrid employment arrangements; strategies to promote more sustainable remote working are discussed.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJMIRen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.2196/30708en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectWell-beingen_US
dc.subjectDieten_US
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_US
dc.subjectMental healthen_US
dc.subjectWork productivityen_US
dc.titleInfluence of the COVID-19 Lockdown on the Physical and Psychosocial Well-being and Work Productivity of Remote Workers: Cross-sectional Correlational Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Plymouthen_US
dc.identifier.journalJMIRxMeden_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-07-27
refterms.dateFOA2021-10-22T08:36:09Z
dc.author.detail300562en_US


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