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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Paul
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Jill
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-04T10:58:50Z
dc.date.available2021-10-04T10:58:50Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-27
dc.identifier.citationStewart, P. and Stewart, J. (2021). ‘Noninvasive continuous intradialytic blood pressure monitoring: the key to improving haemodynamic stability’. Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension, 30(6), pp, 559-562,en_US
dc.identifier.issn1062-4821
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MNH.0000000000000738
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/626032
dc.description.abstractIntradialytic hypotension (IDH) occurs in 20% of haemodialysis treatments, leading to end-organ ischaemia, increased morbidity and mortality; and contributing to poor quality of life for patients. Treatment of IDH is reactive since brachial blood pressure (BP) is recorded only intermittently during haemodialysis, making early detection and prediction of hypotension impossible. Noninvasive continuous BP monitoring would allow earlier detection of IDH and thus support the development of methods for its prediction and consequently prevention. Noninvasive continuous BP monitoring is not yet part of routine practice in renal dialysis units, with a small number of devices (e.g. finger cuffs) having occasionally been used in research settings. In use, patients frequently report pain or discomfort at measurement sites. Additionally, these devices can be unreliable in patients with reduced blood flow to the digits, often manifest in dialysis patients. All existing methods are sensitive to patient movement. A new method for continuously estimating BP has been developed by monitoring arterial pressure near the arteriovenous fistula which can be achieved without any extraneous monitoring equipment attached to the patient. Additionally, artificial intelligence-based methods for real-time prediction of IDH are currently emerging.Key monitoring technologies and computational methods are emerging to support the development of real-time IDH prediction.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFinancial support for the iTrend (Intelligent Technologies for Renal Dialysis) programme is provided by Mel Morris, via the MStart Foundation UKen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOvid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.lww.com/co-nephrolhypertens/Abstract/2021/11000/Noninvasive_continuous_intradialytic_blood.7.aspxen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectInternal Medicineen_US
dc.subjectintradyalitic monitoringen_US
dc.subjectcontinuous blood pressure measurementen_US
dc.subjecthypotensionen_US
dc.subjectdialysisen_US
dc.titleNoninvasive continuous intradialytic blood pressure monitoring: the key to improving haemodynamic stabilityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1473-6543
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Opinion in Nephrology and Hypotensionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleCurrent Opinion in Nephrology & Hypertension
dc.source.volume30
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage559
dc.source.endpage562
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-07-15
dc.author.detail784376en_US


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