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dc.contributor.authorKotera, Yasuhiro
dc.contributor.authorMayer, Claude-Hélène
dc.contributor.authorVanderheiden, Elisabeth
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-29T15:35:23Z
dc.date.available2021-06-29T15:35:23Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-22
dc.identifier.citationKotera, Y., Mayer, C.H. and Vanderheiden, E. (2021). 'Cross-cultural comparison of mental health between German and South African employees: Shame, self-compassion, work engagement and work motivation'. Frontiers in Psychology, pp. 1-15.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2021.627851
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625843
dc.description.abstractThe negative impact of the coronavirus disease outbreak 2019 (COVID-19) on work mental health is reported in many countries including Germany and South Africa: two culturally distinct countries. This study aims to compare mental health between the two workforces to appraise how cultural characteristics may impact their mental health status. A cross-sectional study was used with self-report measures regarding (i) mental health problems, (ii) mental health shame, (iii) self-compassion, (iv) work engagement and (v) work motivation. 257 German employees and 225 South African employees have completed those scales. This study reports results following the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines. T-tests, correlation and regression analyses were performed. German employees had lower mental health problems and mental health shame, and higher self-compassion than South Africans. Mental health problems were positively associated with mental health shame and amotivation, and negatively associated with work engagement and intrinsic motivation in both groups. Lastly, self-compassion, a PP 2.0 construct, was the strongest predictor for mental health problems in both countries. Our results suggest (i) that German culture’s long-term orientation, uncertainty avoidance and restraint may help explain these differences, and (ii) that self-compassion was important to mental health in both countries. While the levels of mental health differed between the two countries, cultivating self-compassion may be an effective way to protect mental health of employees in those countries. Findings can help inform managers and HR staff to refine their wellbeing strategies to reduce the negative impact of the pandemic, especially in German-South African organizations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.627851/fullen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectGeneral Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectGerman employeesen_US
dc.subjectSouth African employeesen_US
dc.subjectcross-cultureen_US
dc.subjectself-compassionen_US
dc.subjectmotivationen_US
dc.subjectengagementen_US
dc.subjectmental health shameen_US
dc.titleCross-Cultural Comparison of Mental Health Between German and South African Employees: Shame, Self-Compassion, Work Engagement, and Work Motivationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1664-1078
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Johannesburgen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEuropa Universität Viadrinaen_US
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Psychologyen_US
dc.identifier.pii10.3389/fpsyg.2021.627851
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in Psychology
dc.source.volume12
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-05-17
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-29T15:35:24Z
dc.author.detail783564en_US


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