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dc.contributor.authorKotera, Yasuhiro
dc.contributor.authorVan Gordon, William
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-28T11:04:07Z
dc.date.available2021-05-28T11:04:07Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-23
dc.identifier.citationKotera, Y. and Van Gordon, W. (2021). 'Effects of self-compassion training on work-related wellbeing: A systematic review'. Frontiers in Psychology, pp. 1-13.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2021.630798
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625799
dc.description.abstractSelf-compassion, sharing some commonalities with positive psychology 2.0 approaches, is associated with better mental health outcomes in diverse populations, including workers. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there is heightened awareness of the importance of self-care for fostering mental health at work. However, evidence regarding the applications of self-compassion interventions in work-related contexts has not been systematically reviewed to date. Therefore, this systematic review aimed to synthesize and evaluate the utility of self-compassion interventions targeting work-related well-being, as well as assess the methodological quality of relevant studies. Eligible articles were identified from research databases including ProQuest, PsycINFO, Science Direct, and Google Scholar. The quality of non-randomized trials and randomized controlled trials was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and the Quality Assessment Table, respectively. The literature search yielded 3,387 titles from which ten studies met the inclusion criteria. All ten studies reported promising effects of self-compassion training for work-related well-being. The methodological quality of these studies was medium. All ten studies recruited workers in a caring field and were mostly conducted in Western countries. The Self-Compassion Scale or its short-form was used in almost all instances. Findings indicate that self-compassion training can improve self-compassion and other work-related well-being outcomes in working populations. However, in general, there is need for greater methodological quality in work-related self-compassion intervention studies to advance understanding regarding the applications and limitations of this technique in work contexts. Furthermore, future studies should focus on a broader range of employee groups, including non-caring professions as well as individuals working in non-Western countries.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.630798/fullen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectself-compassionen_US
dc.subjectsystematic reviewen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectpositive psychology 2.0en_US
dc.titleEffects of Self-Compassion Training on Work-Related Well-Being: A Systematic Reviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1664-1078
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Psychologyen_US
dc.identifier.pii10.3389/fpsyg.2021.630798
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in Psychology
dc.source.volume12
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-04
refterms.dateFOA2021-05-28T11:04:08Z
dc.author.detail783564en_US


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