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dc.contributor.authorMatos, Marcela
dc.contributor.authorMcEwan, Kirsten
dc.contributor.authorBasran, Jaskaran
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-28T10:52:38Z
dc.date.available2021-05-28T10:52:38Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-20
dc.identifier.citationMatos, M., McEwan, K., Kanovský, M., Halamová, J., Steindl, S.R., Ferreira, N., Linharelhos, M., Rijo, D., Asano, K., Gregório, S. and Márquez, M.G., (2021). 'Fears of compassion magnify the harmful effects of threat of COVID‐19 on mental health and social safeness across 21 countries'. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, pp. 1-17.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/cpp.2601
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625797
dc.description.abstractThe COVID-19 pandemic is a massive global health crisis with damaging consequences to mental health and social relationships. Exploring factors that may heighten or buffer the risk of mental health problems in this context is thus critical. Whilst compassion may be a protective factor, in contrast fears of compassion increase vulnerability to psychosocial distress and may amplify the impact of the pandemic on mental health. This study explores the magnifying effects of fears of compassion on the impact of perceived threat of COVID-19 on depression, anxiety and stress, and social safeness. Adult participants from the general population (N = 4057) were recruited across 21 countries worldwide, and completed self-report measures of perceived threat of COVID-19, fears of compassion (for self, from others, for others), depression, anxiety, stress and social safeness. Perceived threat of COVID-19 predicted increased depression, anxiety and stress. The three flows of fears of compassion predicted higher levels of depression, anxiety and stress and lower social safeness. All fears of compassion moderated (heightened) the impact of perceived threat of COVID-19 on psychological distress. Only fears of compassion from others moderated the effects of likelihood of contracting COVID-19 on social safeness. These effects were consistent across all countries. Fears of compassion have a universal magnifying effect on the damaging impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health and social safeness. Compassion focused interventions and communications could be implemented to reduce resistances to compassion and promote mental wellbeing during and following the pandemic.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSFRH/BD/130677/2017/Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology UID/PSI/00730/2020/Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology PP-COVID-20-0074/Slovak Research and Development Agency 1/0075/19/Vedecká grantová agentúra MšVVaš SR a SAV 435-2017-0062/Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Insight Granten_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cpp.2601en_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19 pandemicen_US
dc.subjectfears of compassionen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectmoderator effecten_US
dc.subjectmultinational studyen_US
dc.subjectsocial safenessen_US
dc.titleFears of compassion magnify the harmful effects of threat of COVID-19 on mental health and social safeness across 21 countriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1099-0879
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalClinical Psychology & Psychotherapyen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-04-12
dc.author.detail780504en_US


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