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dc.contributor.authorPringle, Andy
dc.contributor.authorLozano, Lorena
dc.contributor.authorZwolinsky, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-07T12:17:54Z
dc.date.available2021-04-07T12:17:54Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-19
dc.identifier.citationPringle, A.R., Zwolinsky, S. and Lozano, L., (2021). 'Investigating the delivery of health improvement interventions through professional football club community trusts-strengths and challenges'. Public Health in Practice, 2, pp. 1-9.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2666-5352
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.puhip.2021.100104
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625690
dc.description.abstractThis study audits health improvement provision delivered in/by English professional Football Club Community Trusts and reports the strengths and challenges around the implementation of interventions. Multi-methods design: Data were collected through (i) a review of trust websites (n ​= ​72), (ii) an online survey (n ​= ​34/47.2%) and (iii) semi-structured interviews (n ​= ​11/32.3%) with a sub-sample of trust managers. The review of websites confirms all trusts provided physical activity-led interventions. The online survey showed most managers were male (n ​= ​23/67.7%) and white British (n ​= ​30/88.2%). Two thirds held management roles, (n ​= ​23/67.6%) and represented Championship (n ​= ​12/35.2%), League 1 (n ​= ​13/38.2%) and League 2 clubs (n ​= ​9/26.5%). Trusts provided physical activity and most provided diet (n ​= ​31/91.2%) as well as smoking (n ​= ​20/58.8%) and alcohol (n ​= ​19/55.9%) interventions. Weight management, (n ​= ​25/73.5%), mental health interventions (n ​= ​28/82.4%) were offered. Trusts provided male-specific (n ​= ​20/58.8%), with fewer providing female-specific interventions (n ​= ​15/44.1%). Most trusts (n ​= ​30/88.2%) evaluated interventions. 80.8% (n ​= ​21/26) used public health guidance for programme design, 69.2% (n ​= ​18/26) delivery, 57.7% (n ​= ​15/26) needs assessment and 50% (n ​= ​13/26) evaluation. Interviews and qualitative reports identified strengths including, using football, the ‘club brand’, ‘meeting health needs’ and ‘working as a strategic collaboration with partners’. Challenges included ‘short-term funding staffing, mainstreaming, and evaluating interventions’. Football Community Trusts deliver interventions, but challenges were encountered when implementing these programmes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by Leeds Beckett University who received funding from the Football League Trust, UK.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsieveren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S266653522100029Xen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectFootball Community trusten_US
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_US
dc.subjectHealth improvementen_US
dc.titleInvestigating the delivery of health improvement interventions through professional football club community trusts-strengths and challengesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentWest Yorkshire and Harrogate Cancer Allianceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLeeds Beckett Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalPublic health in Practiceen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-02-26
refterms.dateFOA2021-04-07T12:17:55Z
dc.author.detail787106en_US


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