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dc.contributor.authorAshton, Ruth E
dc.contributor.authorAning, Jonathan J
dc.contributor.authorTew, Garry A
dc.contributor.authorRobson, Wendy A
dc.contributor.authorSaxton, John M
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-01T11:41:39Z
dc.date.available2021-02-01T11:41:39Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-23
dc.identifier.citationAshton, R.E., Aning, J.J., Tew, G.A., Robson, W.A. and Saxton, J.M., (2021). 'Supported progressive resistance exercise training to counter the adverse side effects of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: a randomised controlled trial'. Supportive Care in Cancer, pp. 1-11.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid33483790
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00520-021-06002-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625578
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the effects of a supported home-based progressive resistance exercise training (RET) programme on indices of cardiovascular health, muscular strength and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients after treatment with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). This study was a single-site, two-arm randomised controlled trial, with 40 participants randomised to either the intervention or control group over a 10-month period. In addition to receiving usual care, the intervention group completed three weekly RET sessions using resistance bands for 6 months. Participants performed 3 sets of 12–15 repetitions for each exercise, targeting each major muscle group. The control group received usual care only. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was the primary outcome and assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Secondary outcomes included body weight, body fat, aerobic fitness, strength and blood-borne biomarkers associated with cardiometabolic risk. There was no significant difference between the groups in FMD at 3 or 6 months. However, there were improvements in aerobic exercise capacity (P < 0.01) and upper- (P < 0.01) and lower-limb (P = 0.01) strength in favour of the RET group at 6 months, accompanied by greater weight loss (P = 0.04) and a reduction in body fat (P = 0.02). Improvements in HRQoL were evident in the RET group at 3 and 6 months via the PCa-specific component of the FACT-P questionnaire (both P < 0.01). Five adverse events and one serious adverse event were reported throughout the trial duration. This study demonstrates that home-based RET is an effective and safe mode of exercise that elicits beneficial effects on aerobic exercise capacity, muscular strength and HR-QoL in men who have undergone RARP.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Urology Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00520-021-06002-5en_US
dc.subjectCardiometabolicen_US
dc.subjectProstate canceren_US
dc.subjectResistance exerciseen_US
dc.subjectRobot-assisted radical prostatectomyen_US
dc.titleSupported progressive resistance exercise training to counter the adverse side effects of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: a randomised controlled trial.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1433-7339
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBristol Urological Institute, North Bristol NHS Trust, Southmead Hospital, Bristolen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Northumbriaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentFreeman Hospital, Newcastle-upon-Tyneen_US
dc.identifier.journalSupportive care in canceren_US
dc.source.journaltitleSupportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-01-13
dc.author.detail30098en_US
dc.source.countryGermany


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