Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCamp, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Martin
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Kirsty
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Julie
dc.contributor.authorZecca, Massimiliano
dc.contributor.authorDi Nuovo, Alessandro
dc.contributor.authorMagistro, Daniele
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Martin G.C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-05T11:17:41Z
dc.date.available2021-01-05T11:17:41Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-28
dc.identifier.citationCamp, N., Lewis, M., Hunter, K., Johnston, J., Zecca, M., Di Nuovo, A. and Magistro, D., (2020). 'Technology used to recognize activities of daily living in community-dwelling older adults'. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(1), pp. 1-18.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph18010163
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625499
dc.description.abstractThe use of technology has been suggested as a means of allowing continued autonomous living for older adults, while reducing the burden on caregivers and aiding decision-making relating to healthcare. However, more clarity is needed relating to the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) recognised, and the types of technology included within current monitoring approaches. This review aims to identify these differences and highlight the current gaps in these systems. A scoping review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA-ScR, drawing on PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Articles and commercially available systems were selected if they focused on ADL recognition of older adults within their home environment. Thirty-nine ADL recognition systems were identified, nine of which were commercially available. One system incorporated environmental and wearable technology, two used only wearable technology, and 34 used only environmental technologies. Overall, 14 ADL were identified but there was variation in the specific ADL recognised by each system. Although the use of technology to monitor ADL of older adults is becoming more prevalent, there is a large variation in the ADL recognised, how ADL are defined, and the types of technology used within monitoring systems. Key stakeholders, such as older adults and healthcare workers, should be consulted in future work to ensure that future developments are functional and useable.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/1/163en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectwearable technology; environmental sensors; autonomous livingen_US
dc.titleTechnology used to recognize activities of daily living in community-dwelling older adultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1660-4601
dc.contributor.departmentNottingham Trent Universityen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLoughborough Universityen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSheffield Hallam Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen_US
dc.identifier.piiijerph18010163
dc.source.journaltitleInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
dc.source.volume18
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage163
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-12-22
refterms.dateFOA2020-12-28T00:00:00Z
dc.author.detail786762en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Camp et al 2020 - Technology and ...
Size:
2.502Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Main article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International