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dc.contributor.authorBeddingham, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorHenshaw, Lorraine
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Maxine
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Carl
dc.contributor.authorWhitehead, Bill
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-17T16:09:27Z
dc.date.available2020-12-17T16:09:27Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-19
dc.identifier.citationWhitehead, B. (2012) .‘Preceptorship Programmes in the UK: A Systematic Literature Review'. Chesterfield: Royal Hospital NHS Trust.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625486
dc.description.abstractThis is a systematic literature review of the existing published research related to the development of preceptorship programmes in the UK. It has been known for some time that newly qualified nurses experience a period of unsettling transition at the point of registration. In the UK preceptorship has been the professional body’s recommended solution to this for over 20 years. Searches were made of the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and AMED. A systematic review was carried out based on the following questions: What is the experience of the preceptee? What is the experience of the preceptor? What are the ways of measuring the outcome of the preceptorship process? What are potential ways of measuring the outcome of other transitional periods in industries outside of the nursing profession? What are the ways of assessing the learning environment and learner needs? Papers were critically reviewed and relevant data were extracted and synthesised. A results table is presented of the 39 sources generated by the systematic search. Eight themes were identified from the empirical evidence base: ‘Managerial Support Framework’; ‘Recognition and Status of Role’; ‘Protected Time for Preceptor and Preceptee’; ‘Education Preparation of Preceptors’; ‘Recruitment and Retention’; ‘Competence of Preceptees’; ‘Reflection and critical thinking in action’; and ‘Efficacy of Existing Measurement Tools’. There is strong evidence that the newly qualified nurse wants and benefits from a period of structured preceptorship. This translates to improved patient care and benefits recruitment and retention for the employing organisations. Recommendations for Practice: The existing literature provides an evidence base upon which to construct a preceptorship programme and a means by which to measure its efficacy and monitor its future development. Recommendations for Future Research: Case study research projects should be considered for future preceptorship programmes in order to find the most effective methods of delivery.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipChesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Trusten_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherChesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Trusten_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
dc.subjectPreceptorshipen_US
dc.titlePreceptorship programmes in the UK: A systematic literature reviewen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.contributor.departmentChesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trusten_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2012-01-19
dc.author.detail778930en_US


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