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dc.contributor.authorMartinelli, Thomas F.
dc.contributor.authorvan de Mheen, Dike
dc.contributor.authorBest, David
dc.contributor.authorVanderplasschen, Wouter
dc.contributor.authorNagelhout, Gera E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-10T18:35:05Z
dc.date.available2020-11-10T18:35:05Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-09
dc.identifier.citationMartinelli, T.F., van de Mheen, H., Best, D., Vanderplasschen, W. and Nagelhout, G.E., (2020). 'Are members of mutual aid groups better equipped for addiction recovery?: European cross-sectional study into recovery capital, social networks and commitment to sobriety'. Drugs-Education, Prevention and Policy, pp. 1-22.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09687637.2020.1844638
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625372
dc.description.abstractAn increasing body of evidence shows that informal mutual aid groups benefit those in addiction recovery. However, attention for mutual aid groups in practice and policy varies internationally and is only recently emerging in continental Europe. Existing evidence is mostly limited to studies of Alcoholics Anonymous groups in the United States. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to examine the relationship between membership of a variety of mutual aid groups and recovery capital, participation in social networks, and commitment to sobriety for individuals in drug addiction recovery (N ¼ 367), living in the UK, the Netherlands, and Belgium. A convenience sample of participants completed an extensive assessment about their recovery experiences. Sixty-nine percent of participants reported lifetime (ever) membership of different mutual aid groups. Analyses reveal that membership of mutual aid groups is strongly associated with more participation and (self-reported) changes in social networks, greater levels of recovery capital, and a stronger commitment to sobriety. The findings suggest that participation in mutual aid groups may support addiction recovery through multiple mechanisms of change in favor of recovery. These findings highlight how mutual aid support may complement formal addiction treatment.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Health Researchen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09687637.2020.1844638?journalCode=idep20en_US
dc.subjectMedicine (miscellaneous)en_US
dc.subjectHealth(social science)en_US
dc.subjectSubstance-related disorders; recovery; mutual aid groups; addiction treatment; self-helpen_US
dc.titleAre members of mutual aid groups better equipped for addiction recovery? European cross-sectional study into recovery capital, social networks, and commitment to sobrietyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1465-3370
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalDrugs: Education, Prevention and Policyen_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1080/09687637.2020.1844638
dc.source.journaltitleDrugs: Education, Prevention and Policy
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage10
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-10-14
dc.author.detail786975en_US


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