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dc.contributor.authorElander, James
dc.contributor.authorMorris, J.
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, G.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-05T10:20:11Z
dc.date.available2020-10-05T10:20:11Z
dc.date.issued2012-12-14
dc.identifier.citationElander, J., Morris, J. & Robinson, G. (2013). 'Pain coping and acceptance as longitudinal predictors of health-related quality of life among people with hemophilia-related chronic joint pain'. European Journal of Pain, 17 (6), pp. 929-938.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1090-3801
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/j.1532-2149.2012.00258.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625240
dc.description.abstractInterventions based on coping and acceptance can be adapted for people with different painful conditions. Evidence about baseline characteristics that predict improved outcomes is informative for matching people to interventions, whereas evidence about changes that predict improved outcomes is informative about the processes that interventions should target. Participants in a low-intensity program to promote self-management of hemophilia-related chronic joint pain (n=101) reported pain intensity, coping, acceptance and quality of life at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Baseline and change measures of pain intensity, coping and acceptance were used to predict follow-up quality of life, taking account of baseline quality of life. Changed (reduced) pain intensity predicted better physical quality of life, independently of age, hemophilia severity, baseline pain intensity and baseline physical quality of life. Lower baseline passive coping and changed (increased) pain acceptance predicted better mental quality of life, independently of age, severity, and baseline mental quality of life. Increased activity engagement but not pain willingness predicted better mental quality of life when pain acceptance was decomposed. Changed (reduced) negative thoughts also predicted better mental quality of life when separate acceptance subscales were used. Active pain coping did not predict physical or mental quality of life. Initially high levels of passive coping may be an obstacle to improving mental quality of life. Acceptance rather than coping may be a more useful behavioral change target, but more research is needed about the meanings and therapeutic implications of different elements of pain acceptance.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Haemophilia Society UK and the Institute for Health Policy and Research, London Metropolitan University.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/j.1532-2149.2012.00258.xen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectHemophiliaen_US
dc.subjectJoint painen_US
dc.subjectCopingen_US
dc.subjectAcceptanceen_US
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_US
dc.titlePain coping and acceptance as longitudinal predictors of health-related quality of life among people with haemophilia-related joint painen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Painen_US
dc.source.journaltitleEuropean Journal of Pain
dc.source.volume17
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage929
dc.source.endpage938
dcterms.dateAccepted2012-05-01
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-05T10:20:11Z
dc.author.detail779740en_US


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