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dc.contributor.authorMortimore, Gerri
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-16T14:35:08Z
dc.date.available2020-09-16T14:35:08Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-11
dc.identifier.citationMortimore, G. (2020). 'The recognition and management of sepsis in urgent care out of hours setting'. Practice Nursing, 31(7).en_US
dc.identifier.issn0964-9271
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/pnur.2020.31.7.282
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625166
dc.description.abstractAs the majority of sepsis cases occur in the community, Justine Dexter and Gerri Mortimore provide an overview of the assessment, diagnosis and management of the condition for those working in out of hours settings. Sepsis is a life-threatening and common condition prompted by a microbial infection. Sepsis is responsible for the death of more people than prostate, bowel or breast cancer collectively, and it causes the second highest mortality rates after cardiovascular disease. The majority of sepsis cases occur in the community, with 30% developing while the patient is in hospital. In many instances, sepsis is avoidable and treatable. The aetiology of sepsis is not always known, making diagnosis difficult, with only 50% of cases having a confirmed pathogenic organism. The signs and symptoms most obviously connected with sepsis are confusion or unusual behaviour, hypotension and increased respiratory rate. However, some patients have non-specific symptoms, and just complain of feeling extremely unwell. Any patients who have these signs or symptoms should be assessed for the possibility of sepsis, regardless of whether pyrexia is present. To aid in detection and decision making about sepsis, the use of screening tools have been advocated to shorten the period prior to the administration of antibiotics. Children characteristically compensate physiologically for a considerable time and then deteriorate quickly; therefore, a crucial focus is to spot a sick child rapidly. Many urgent care out of hours (UCOOH) services are nurse-led. Therefore, it often falls on advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs) to educate healthcare assistants to spot the sick person, especially as they are usually the first person the patient sees. Leadership plays a key role for ANPs in UCOOH by helping to progress the pathway for patients to ensure the sickest are prioritised.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMAGen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.magonlinelibrary.com/journal/pnuren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/abs/10.12968/pnur.2020.31.7.282en_US
dc.subjectsepsis, urgent care, out of hours, nursingen_US
dc.titleThe recognition and management of sepsis in urgent care out of hours settingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalPractice Nursingen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-06-29
refterms.dateFOA2021-04-14T10:42:43Z
dc.author.detail782817en_US


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