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dc.contributor.authorKim, Jeffrey J.
dc.contributor.authorKent, Kirsty M.
dc.contributor.authorCunnington, Ross
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorKirby, James N.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-04T12:46:45Z
dc.date.available2020-09-04T12:46:45Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-13
dc.identifier.citationKim, J.J., Kent, K.M., Cunnington, R., Gilbert, P. and Kirby, J.N., (2020). 'Attachment styles modulate neural markers of threat and imagery when engaging in self-criticism'. Scientific Reports, 10(1), pp. 1-10.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-020-70772-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625156
dc.description.abstractAttachment styles hold important downstream consequences for mental health through their contribution to the emergence of self-criticism. To date, no work has extended our understanding of the influence of attachment styles on self-criticism at a neurobiological level. Herein we investigate the relationship between self-reported attachment styles and neural markers of self-criticism using fMRI. A correlation network analysis revealed lingual gyrus activation during self-criticism, a marker of visual mental imagery, correlated with amygdala activity (threat response). It also identified that secure attachment positively correlated with lingual gyrus activation, whilst avoidant attachment was negatively correlated with lingual gyrus activation. Further, at greater levels of amygdala response, more securely attached individuals showed greater lingual gyrus activation, and more avoidantly attached individuals showed less lingual gyrus activation. Our data provide the first evidence that attachment mechanisms may modulate threat responses and mental imagery when engaging in self-criticism, which have important clinical and broader social implications.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian Postgraduate Scholarshipsen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-70772-x#Abs1en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectMultidisciplinaryen_US
dc.subjectAttachmenten_US
dc.subjectself-criticismen_US
dc.titleAttachment styles modulate neural markers of threat and imagery when engaging in self-criticismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2045-2322
dc.contributor.departmentCompassionate Mind Research Group, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe Centre for Advanced Imaging, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen_US
dc.identifier.pii70772
dc.source.journaltitleScientific Reports
dc.source.volume10
dc.source.issue1
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-08-04
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-04T12:46:46Z
dc.author.detailVCHI583en_US


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