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dc.contributor.authorHearn, Jasmine Heath
dc.contributor.authorFinlay, Katherine Anne
dc.contributor.authorSheffield, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-21T14:43:14Z
dc.date.available2020-08-21T14:43:14Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-04
dc.identifier.citationHearn, J. H., Finlay, K. A., & Sheffield, D. (2020). ‘Trying to bring attention to your body when you’re not sure where it is’: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of drivers and barriers to mindfulness for people with spinal cord injury'. British Journal of Health Psychology, pp. 1-18.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1359107X
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bjhp.12462
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625107
dc.description.abstractWork is beginning to explore the impact of mindfulness in managing the physical and psychological health of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, no previous work has sought to understand what drives people with such conditions to try mindfulness, and what barriers are experienced in accessing mindfulness. An exploratory, qualitative, interview design, utilizing interpretative phe- nomenological analysis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 people with SCI who had experience of mindfulness since sustaining their injury. Verbatim transcripts were analysed using IPA to understand the lived experience of mindfulness post-SCI. Analysis suggested that managing physical and mental health, and viewing mindfulness as proactive and protective were key drivers for exploring mindfulness. However, multiple barriers to accessing opportunities and developing capability impeded engagement. These included the focus on areas of the body that participants had reduced sensation in, physical environments that could not be navigated in a wheelchair, social stigma surrounding the use of mindfulness, and a sense of obligation and risk of failure implied by perceived requirements for engagement. The results demonstrate the need for specific interventions to accom- modate the reduced sensory and physical function experienced by people with neurological conditions and to enhance sense of control and autonomy. In addition, recommendations include minimizing the stigma surrounding mindfulness, and the potentially demotivating impact of the perception of ‘failing’ to engage.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipnoneen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bjhp.12462en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectdisabilityen_US
dc.subjectmeditationen_US
dc.subjectqualitativeen_US
dc.subjectsensory functionen_US
dc.title‘Trying to bring attention to your body when you’re not sure where it is’: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of drivers and barriers to mindfulness for people with spinal cord injuryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn20448287
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentManchester Metropolitan Universityen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Buckinghamen_US
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Health Psychologyen_US
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85088986005
dc.identifier.scopusidSCOPUS_ID:85088986005
dc.source.journaltitleBritish Journal of Health Psychology
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-07-13
refterms.dateFOA2020-08-21T14:43:15Z
dc.author.detail781372en_US


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