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dc.contributor.authorKotera, Yasuhiro
dc.contributor.authorVan Laethem, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorOhshima, Remi
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-17T09:26:16Z
dc.date.available2020-07-17T09:26:16Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-09
dc.identifier.citationKotera, Y., Van Laethem, M. and Ohshima, R. (2020). 'Cross-cultural comparison of mental health between Japanese and Dutch workers: Relationships with mental health shame, self-compassion, work engagement and motivation'. Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, pp. 1-20.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2059-5794
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/CCSM-02-2020-0055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/625015
dc.description.abstractThe primary purpose of this descriptive study was to compare the levels of, and relationships among mental health problems, mental health shame, self-compassion, work engagement, and work motivation between workers in Japan (collectivistic and success-driven culture) and the Netherlands (individualistic and quality-oriented culture). A cross-sectional design, where convenience samples of 165 Japanese and 160 Dutch workers completed self-report measures about mental health problems, shame, self-compassion, engagement and motivation, was used. Welch t-tests, correlation and regression analyses were conducted to compare i) the levels of these variables, ii) relationships among these variables, and iii) predictors of mental health problems, between the two groups. Dutch workers had higher levels of mental health problems, work engagement and intrinsic motivation, and lower levels of shame and amotivation than Japanese workers. Mental health problems were associated with shame in both samples. Mental health problems were negatively predicted by self-compassion in Japanese, and by work engagement in Dutch employees. The novelty of this study relates to exploring differences in work mental health between those two culturally contrasting countries. Our findings highlight potential cultural differences such as survey responding (Japanese acquiescent responding vs Dutch self-enhancement) and cultural emphases (Japanese shame vs Dutch quality of life). Job crafting, mindfulness and enhancing ikigai (meaningfulness in life) may be helpful to protect mental health in these workers, relating to self-compassion and work engagement. Findings from this study would be particularly useful to employers, managers, and staff in human resources who work with cross-cultural workforce.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEmeralden_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/CCSM-02-2020-0055/full/htmlen_US
dc.subjectcross-cultureen_US
dc.subjectJapanese workersen_US
dc.subjectDutch workersen_US
dc.subjectwork mental healthen_US
dc.subjectself-compassionen_US
dc.subjectwork engagementen_US
dc.titleCross-cultural comparison of mental health between Japanese and Dutch workers: Relationships with mental health shame, self-compassion, work engagement and motivationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2059-5794
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Amsterdamen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMejiro Daigaku, Shinjuku-ku, Japanen_US
dc.identifier.journalCross Cultural & Strategic Managementen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-05-17
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-17T09:26:16Z
dc.author.detail783564en_US


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