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dc.contributor.authorWalton, Courtney C.
dc.contributor.authorBaranoff, John
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorKirby, James
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-09T13:21:28Z
dc.date.available2020-07-09T13:21:28Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-29
dc.identifier.citationWalton, C.C., Baranoff, J., Gilbert, P. and Kirby, J., (2020). 'Self-compassion, social rank, and psychological distress in athletes of varying competitive levels'. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 50(101733), pp. 1-7.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychsport.2020.101733
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624964
dc.description.abstractSelf-Compassion may be seen as a concept contrary to the aims of athletes engaged in competitive sport. This could be accentuated at more elite levels, where athletes may view concepts like self-criticism and self-judgement as more important for improvement. The current study aimed to better understand how athletes of different competitive levels (from social to international) relate to concepts of self-compassion. Further, we aimed to explore how factors relating to social rank and self-compassion contribute to psychological distress. Cross-sectional online survey. An online survey was distributed, including the following validated questionnaires: Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales, the Self-Compassion Scale, Fears of Compassion Scales, Social Comparison Scale, Forms of Self-Criticising/Attacking & Self-Reassuring Scale, and the Striving to Avoid Inferiority Scale. Two hundred and fifty-three participants responded to the survey, including 115 recreational and 79 competitive athletes. There were no differences between groups on any measure of compassion or social rank. In a multiple linear regression model, lower self-compassion, higher fears of compassion (for self), and higher feelings of inadequacy predicted more pronounced psychological distress in athletes. Contrary to expectation, the results suggest that even highly elite athletes may be open to using self-compassion. Given that reduced self-compassion and sense of social rank contributed to psychological distress in athletes, the results suggest that compassion-based approaches to treating psychological distress in this population may be valid.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S146902921930843X?via%3Dihuben_US
dc.rights© 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectathletesen_US
dc.subjectmental healthen_US
dc.subjectself-compassionen_US
dc.subjectcompetitivenessen_US
dc.subjectsocial ranken_US
dc.titleSelf-compassion, social rank, and psychological distress in athletes of varying competitive levelsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Queensland, Brisbaneen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalPsychology of Sport and Exerciseen_US
dc.identifier.piiS146902921930843X
dc.source.journaltitlePsychology of Sport and Exercise
dc.source.volume50
dc.source.beginpage101733
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-05-25
dc.author.detailvchi583en_US


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