The Spaces/Places Arts Research Group has evolved from a ‘Women Artists in History’ group. The focus is on women’s art and research, including areas like film, video, photography, painting as well as curation and exhibition practices. The group arose from interest in the spaces available to exhibit women’s art and the ways in which physical and digital spaces can be used to provide places for this. The group engages with both artistic practice and research related to the ways in which this work is represented, interpreted and placed within history and the contemporary context.

Recent Submissions

  • Découverte de l’artiste’ (discovering the artist): Finding Marion Adnams through her work with a focus on ‘Infante égarée

    Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (2018)
    This video installation expresses the process of research Marion Adnams' paintings and the paper model of Infante égarée in particular. A version of paper model from the original painting has been constructed and animated in order to understand the structure of the original paper doll and to emulate the movement that is implicit in its structure. The animation was then superimposed onto the original painting. Adnams described the figure as lost and wandering in the forest and this sense of dislocation is captured within the twisting movement of the figure and haunting soundtrack. The title of the painting is also restored to Adnams’ preferred French title. The video is part of the Marion Adnams Project and illustrates an interest in practice as a form of research. The video installation formed part of the ‘Marion Adnams: A Singular Woman’ retrospective at Derby Museums and Gallery (Dec 2017-March 2018).
  • Let’s talk about peace over dinner: A cultural experience on memory, dislocation and the politics of belonging in Cyprus.

    Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Intellect, 2018-04-23)
    On Saturday 9 April 2011, Greek Cypriot artist Lia Lapithi invited a group of eighteen guests to join her for her own version of the Last Supper, a four-course dinner that took place in the warehouse of an old furniture factory in Nicosia, Cyprus. The dinner was the first project of a series of orchestrated meals that Lapithi hosted and participated, where the theme was hospitality and politics in Cyprus.1 Significant to Lapithi’s work are autobiographical experiences and the geopolitical division of Cyprus. Born in 1963 in Cyprus, Lapithi experienced at a young age the traumatic 1974 division of Cyprus and the on-going occupation of half of the island by Turkey.2 This article explores the significance of an orchestrated meal for the politics of belonging and remembering in contemporary Cyprus. It analyses the representation of the event by Lapithi, who engaged in questioning the meaning of peace by serving food as a ‘medium’ and as a ‘symbol of peace’. It also explores Lapithi’s strategies in communicating her own memories and experiences as a refugee who can visit her family’s house over the occupied northern side of Cyprus only as a guest. Through the discussion of food/taste and visuals, this article will consider how the dinner acts as a means of catharsis for the participants and develops a critical understanding of contemporary events in Cyprus and our reaction to them.
  • Defining the female artist: Marion Adnams and surrealism

    Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (07/03/2018)
    Marion Adnams’ work can be placed into different periods and subject matter and curating her work involves making decisions about such criteria. But to what extent are wider grouping useful in defining an artist’s work and does placing Marion Adnams in the context of Surrealism offer any insights into her practice? The relationship of women artists to Surrealism and the female/male dichotomies within the movement will be considered in relation to the ways in which they resonate with motifs and themes within Marion Adnams’ own work. French Surrealism was largely envisaged as a collective movement, encapsulated in its British counterpart in the work of artists such as Nash and Agar, in painting, found objects and poetry, which may provide an understanding of Marion’s individual yet surrealist approach to her work.
  • Marion Adnams symposium

    University of Derby; Derby Museum and Art Gallery; Forde, Teresa (07/03/2018)
    A unique opportunity to further explore the life and work of Marion Adnams, including the exhibition of Marion Adnams' work and her involvement in the Midland Group, as well as broader linked themes, such as the representation of women artists.
  • Marion Adnams: A singular woman

    Forde, Teresa; Wood, Val; Bamford, Lucy; University of Derby; Derby Museums and Art Gallery (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 02/12/2017)
    Retrospective of Marion Adnams' work: Marion Elizabeth Adnams was born in Derby in 1898 where she remained, for the most part, until her death, aged ninety-six. During the course of her long life, she forged a reputation as a painter of deeply distinctive and dream-like visions inspired by the Surrealist movement. Adnams exhibited almost continuously in London and regional art galleries from the late 1930s and examples of her work can be found in many public collections, alongside that of her friends and contemporaries Evelyn Gibbs and Eileen Agar. Despite this, her work is largely forgotten today. This important exhibition brings together the full and diverse range of her art for the first time in almost fifty years in a bid to recapture the legacy of this most remarkable artist. This exhibition was made possible with support from Art Fund. This exhibition was curated in partnership with Val Wood, independent researcher, and Teresa Forde, Senior Lecturer in Film and Media at the University of Derby.
  • Who Are We, Where Do We Come From, Where Are We Going To? Greek Cypriot Women Artists in Contemporary Cyprus

    Photiou, Maria; Loughborough University (Taylor & Francis Publishers, 2012)
    This article is about Greek Cypriot women artists. In particular it concerns their art, their careers, and their relation to politics; the way they were influenced by politics in Cyprus and how they represented the political upheavals of the time in their own practice. Although all these artists experienced the several phases of Cypriot history in a different way, they all have something in common: the fact that these artists were women living in a colonised, patriarchal country under Greek Cypriot nationality. Their practices are the result of what they experienced and an analysis of their work will reveal the artistic strategies they applied as a response to the politics in Cypriot society.
  • Be/come closer to home: Narratives of contested lands in the visual practices of Katerina Attalidou and Alexandra Handal

    Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 27/05/2016)
    Women from Cyprus and Palestine are citizens of divided countries and have experienced conspiracies and invasions that have confiscated their homelands. This article investigates visual practices of women artists and the ways in which they are embedded in the space of each location. It aims to reflect on artists' experiences of borders, location and narrations of homeland. It focuses on the artistic practices of Greek-Cypriot artist Katerina Attalidou and Alexandra Handal, who engage in questioning and challenging issues on homeland, borders, history, citizenship, identity and exile. This article will enquire as to how the idea of homeland 'real or imagined' is represented in visual works and will investigate how the usage of images and narratives can challenge the concept of home. Through the discussion of images this article will consider how these practices serve as a reminder of exile and develop a critical understanding of contemporary events and our reaction to them.