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dc.contributor.authorStelfox, Martin
dc.contributor.authorBurian, Alfred
dc.contributor.authorShanker, Kartik
dc.contributor.authorRees, Alan F.
dc.contributor.authorJean, Claire
dc.contributor.authorWillson, Maïa S.
dc.contributor.authorManik, Nashwa Ahmed
dc.contributor.authorSweet, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-07T15:59:18Z
dc.date.available2020-04-07T15:59:18Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-07
dc.identifier.citationStelfox, M., Burian, A., Shanker, K., Rees, A., F., Jean, C., Willson, M., S. Manik, N., A., and Sweet, M. (2020). ‘Tracing the origin of olive ridley turtles entangled in ghost nets in the Maldives: A phylogeographic assessment of populations at risk’. Biological Conservation, 245, pp. 1-10.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biocon.2020.108499
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624685
dc.description.abstractAbandoned, lost or discarded fishing nets, (ghost nets) represent a major threat to marine vertebrates. However, thorough assessments of their impact on threatened species are largely missing. In the Maldives, olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) are frequently caught in ghost nets however the archipelago does not support a significant nesting population. Our aim in this study was to determine the origin of olive ridleys entangled in ghost nets found in the Maldives and evaluate potential impacts on respective source populations. Based on a citizen science and conservation program, we recorded 132 olive ridley turtles entangled in ghost nets in just one year. Genetic analyses (mtDNA) of entangled individuals and of potential source populations revealed that most captured olive ridleys originated from Sri Lanka and eastern India. Oman could be excluded as source population, even during the prevalence of the south west monsoon. Based on our results and already available published literature, we were able to estimate that the recorded ghost net entanglements accounted for a relatively small amount (0.48%) of the eastern Indian population. However, the entangled turtles accounted for a much larger percentage (41%) of the Sri Lankan populations. However, it should be noted that our estimates of population-level mortality are linked to substantial uncertainty due to the lack of reliable information on population dynamics. Consequently, any precautionary protection measures applied should be complemented with improved quantification of turtle recruitment and life-stage specific mortalities.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOlive Ridley Projecten_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0006320719313874?via%3Dihuben_US
dc.rights© 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.rights.urihttps://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/
dc.subjectEcology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematicsen_US
dc.subjectNature and Landscape Conservationen_US
dc.titleTracing the origin of olive ridley turtles entangled in ghost nets in the Maldives: A phylogeographic assessment of populations at risken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentOlive Ridley Project, 11 Dane Close, Bramhall, Stockport, Cheshireen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, Indiaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDakshin Foundation, Bangalore, Indiaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Exeteren_US
dc.contributor.departmentKelonia, 46 rue du General De Gaulle, 97436 Saint Leu, La Reunion, Franceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironment Society of Oman, Omanen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Protection Agency, Maldivesen_US
dc.identifier.journalBiological Conservationen_US
dc.identifier.piiS0006320719313874
dc.source.journaltitleBiological Conservation
dc.source.volume245
dc.source.beginpage108499
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-02-29
dc.author.detail783337en_US


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