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dc.contributor.authorChance-Larsen, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorChance-Larsen, Kenneth
dc.contributor.authorDivanoglou, Anestis
dc.contributor.authorBaird, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-07T15:48:59Z
dc.date.available2020-04-07T15:48:59Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-20
dc.identifier.citationChance-Larsen, F., Chance-Larsen, K., Divanoglou, A. & Baird, A. (2018) 'The use of an e-learning module on return to work advice for physiotherapists – A prospective cohort study'. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 36(2), pp. 267-275.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid29924673
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09593985.2018.1485193
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624684
dc.description.abstractNonspecific low back pain (LBP) can progress to chronic disability and prolonged absence from work. Despite clinical and professional guidelines, physiotherapists often fail to address return to work outcomes. The aim of this exploratory study was to determine whether an e-learning resource tailored to physiotherapy practice could affect physiotherapists’ attitudes and beliefs regarding return to work advice for their patients. Design: A prospective interventional cohort study (pilot). Methods: Participants were recruited via the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy website. Responses on a clinical vignette, the Health Care Providers’ Pain and Impairment Scale (HC-Pairs), and the Behavioral Constructs Questionnaire (BCQ) were collected online at baseline (Q1) and 2-months post-intervention (Q2). Fifty-four physiotherapists completed Q1 and the response rate for Q2 was 44/54 (81%). Changes in the degree of agreement with guidelines indicated that the intervention made an impact on respondents (kappa 0.345; p = 0.003). HC-Pairs and BCQ results showed a nonstatistically significant trend toward the target behavior. There is a need for interventions to improve adherence with advice for return to work following nonspecific LBP. An e-learning tool for physiotherapists on advising patients regarding return to work has potential to positively affect self-reported clinical behavior.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09593985.2018.1485193?journalCode=iptp20en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectLow back painen_US
dc.subjectcase managementen_US
dc.subjecte-learningen_US
dc.subjectguidelinesen_US
dc.subjectoccupational healthen_US
dc.subjectreturn to worken_US
dc.titleThe use of an e-learning module on return to work advice for physiotherapists - A prospective cohort study.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1532-5040
dc.contributor.departmentManchester University NHS Foundation Trusten_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Central Lancashireen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Icelanden_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalPhysiotherapy theory and practiceen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePhysiotherapy theory and practice
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage9
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-04-17
dc.author.detail779445en_US
dc.source.countryEngland


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