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dc.contributor.authorNaylor, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorFoulkes, Denise
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-06T10:45:30Z
dc.date.available2020-04-06T10:45:30Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-07
dc.identifier.citationNaylor, S. and Foulkes, D., (2018). 'Diagnostic radiographers working in the operating theatre: an action research project'. Radiography, 24(1), pp.9-14.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1078-8174
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.radi.2017.09.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624664
dc.description.abstractFailures in interprofessional communication are well-documented and are an established cause of medical error and negative health outcomes. Socio-historical issues like imbalances in power and status are particularly prevalent in the operating theatre environment, adding complications to interprofessional working. Simulation, used in healthcare education, may impact positively on interprofessional working. The aim of this action research study was to develop, pilot and run a simulation experience for Diagnostic Radiography (DRAD) students. Action research was used to structure this study. The first phase of the action research was to look at the problem; this was undertaken using critical incident technique. Findings from the critical incident technique influenced the simulation event. A focus group was held immediately after the event for reflection. A second simulation using a cohort of 48 students and a reflection after a period of three months formed the second round of the project. The simulation took place in a hi-fidelity simulated operating theatre. Thematic content analysis was undertaken of the focus group, data from the critical incident technique, and the reflections. The findings are discussed under the themes; identification, clarity, preparation, and the expert. Identification and lack of clarity in communication were seen as an important issue in the operating theatre. Lack of preparation of the working environment was also highlighted. Lack of confidence in the operating theatre inhibits interprofessional working. Simulation can help prepare students for working in the operating theatre. Realism is important as is scheduling the event to ensure maximum benefit.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1078817417301402?via%3Dihuben_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/17108en_US
dc.rights© 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.rights.urihttps://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/
dc.subjectInterprofessional simulation, Action research, Operating theatre, Diagnostic radiographyen_US
dc.titleDiagnostic radiographers working in the operating theatre: An action research projecten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSheffield Hallam Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalRadiographyen_US
dc.identifier.piiS1078817417301402
dc.source.journaltitleRadiography
dc.source.volume24
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage9
dc.source.endpage14
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-09-03
dc.author.detail786778en_US


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