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dc.contributor.authorChurch, Gavin
dc.contributor.authorParker, Jack
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Lauren
dc.contributor.authorMawson, Susan
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-01T15:31:07Z
dc.date.available2020-04-01T15:31:07Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-19
dc.identifier.citationChurch, G., Parker, J., Powell, L. and Mawson, S., (2019). 'The effectiveness of group exercise for improving activity and participation in adult stroke survivors: a systematic review'. Physiotherapy, 105(4), pp. 399-411.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0031-9406
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.physio.2019.01.005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624643
dc.description.abstractFollowing post stroke rehabilitation, group exercise interventions can be used to continue improving cardiovascular fitness, activity levels, balance, gait, movement efficiency, and strengthening. However, little is known of the effectiveness of group exercise for improving activity and participation in stroke survivors. This review aims to assess the effectiveness of group exercise for improving activity and participation in adult stroke survivors. Databases searched were MEDLINE, Web of Science (Core collection), CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of group exercise using validated outcome measures of activity and participation for post stroke rehabilitation. Two independent reviewers assessed all abstracts, extracted data, conducted a narrative synthesis and assessed the quality of all included articles. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool assessed methodological quality and included outcome measure quality was assessed. 14 RCTs were included (n = 624 chronic stroke survivors collectively). Studies ranged between 12 and 243 stroke participants with an average of left:right hemisphere lesions of 32:39 and average age was 66.7 years. Although intervention and control groups improved, no significant difference between group differences were evident and implications of key findings: The review found improvements are short-term and less evident at long-term follow up with little improvements in participation after 6 months. However, this review was limited to the standard of intervention reporting. Further research should consider consistency in measuring underpinning mechanisms of group exercise interventions, which may explain the lack of activity changes in long-term follow-up.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute for Health Research CLAHRC YHen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031940619300112en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/142276/en_US
dc.rights© 2019 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.rights.urihttps://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/
dc.subjectPhysical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectStrokeen_US
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectGroup exerciseen_US
dc.subjectFunctionen_US
dc.subjectIntensityen_US
dc.titleThe effectiveness of group exercise for improving activity and participation in adult stroke survivors: a systematic reviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffielden_US
dc.identifier.journalPhysiotherapyen_US
dc.identifier.piiS0031940619300112
dc.source.journaltitlePhysiotherapy
dc.source.volume105
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage399
dc.source.endpage411
dcterms.dateAccepted2019
dc.author.detail787041en_US


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