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dc.contributor.authorSecretary, SRR
dc.contributor.authorwhiffin, charlotte
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorEllis-Hill, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorNikki, Jarrett
dc.contributor.authorPeter, Hutchinson J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-27T14:36:09Z
dc.date.available2020-03-27T14:36:09Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-13
dc.identifier.citationWhiffin, C., Bailey, C., Ellis-Hill, C., Jarrett, N. & Hutchinson, P. (2020). 'An exploration of family in the context of head injury: a narrative understanding of change'. Clinical Rehabilitation.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0269-2155
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0269215520902499
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624626
dc.description.abstractTraumatic brain injury is potentially devastating. Families commonly respond by supporting the injured individual and their recovery. However, family members are at risk of negative psychological outcomes and family functioning has emerged as a key variable post injury. What is less understood are the subjective changes experienced by families and the impact these have post injury. A longitudinal narrative case study using in-depth narrative qualitative interviews. Data were collected a one, three and 12 months post injury. Nine non-injured family members from three families were recruited from an acute neurosurgical ward. Five interwoven narrative threads were identified: trauma, recovery, autobiographical, suffering and family. The narrative approach emphasized that the first-year post-head injury was a turbulent time for families, who were active agents in the process of change. Families’ stories of illness from a nonpatient perspective need recognition and validation in their own right. understanding this experience in terms of biographical narratives helps to recognize the vacillation between change and continuity. Adopting a narrative approach to rehabilitation may be more positive than adopting a model of loss. Change is not limited to the injured person and family members need help to understand that they too are changing as a result of their experiences. In addition, it is proposed that there be a shift in the discourse in research and practice literature away from loss and towards transition, with greater recognition of the role that uninjured family members play in making sense of change post injury.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.sagepub.com/toc/CRE/currenten_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269215520902499en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectTraumatic Brain Injuryen_US
dc.subjectFamilyen_US
dc.subjectQualitativeen_US
dc.titleAn exploration of family in the context of head injury: a narrative understanding of changeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1477-0873
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Nottinghamen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBournemouth Universityen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Portsmouthen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Cambridgeen_US
dc.identifier.journalClinical Rehabilitationen_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1177/0269215520902499
dc.source.journaltitleClinical Rehabilitation
dc.source.beginpage026921552090249
dcterms.dateAccepted2020
dc.author.detail782131en_US


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