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dc.contributor.authorVan Gordon, William
dc.contributor.authorSapthaing, Supakyada
dc.contributor.authorDucasse, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorShonin, Edo
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-25T15:41:48Z
dc.date.available2020-02-25T15:41:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.citationVan Gordon, W., Sapthaing, S., Ducasse, D., and Shonin, E. (2019). 'Second-generation mindfulness-based interventions: toward more authentic mindfulness practice and teaching'. Journal of Concurrent Disorders, 1(2), pp. 57-63.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624522
dc.description.abstractWhile scientific understanding concerning the role of biological pathogenic agents in the transmission of communicable diseases has increased markedly in recent decades, the possibility of a psychological pathogenic agent that underlies the transmission of a number of key global public health concerns has largely been overlooked. The present paper identifies inverted hallucinations as a novel category of hallucination that not only reflect a key public health concern in their own right, but also appear to play an active role in the gradual transmission of diseases traditionally deemed to be non-communicable, such as mental health problems, obesity, and social media addiction. More specifically, the present paper delineates the assumptions and indicative empirical support underlying inverted hallucination theory as well as the characteristic features, functional consequences, prevalence, communicability, and co-occurrence of inverted hallucinations in the general population. Inverted hallucinations appear to be both globally prevalent and communicable, and are estimated to affect the average person on at least an occasional basis. Inverted hallucinations cause individuals to succumb to states of mind wandering that distorts their perception of what is happening in the present moment and increases their susceptibility to other deleterious health conditions. Moreover, inverted hallucinations appear to reflect a key overlooked public health need that not only stunt human potential and quality of life but also pose a risk to the wellbeing of the population globally.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNAen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherConcurrent Disorders Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://concurrentdisorders.ca/en_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://concurrentdisorders.ca/2019/05/26/issue-two/en_US
dc.subjectHallucinationsen_US
dc.subjectMindlessnessen_US
dc.subjectMindfulnessen_US
dc.titleThe prevalence, communicability and co-occurrence of inverted hallucinations: an overlooked global public health concernen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Concurrent Disordersen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-12-10
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-25T15:41:49Z
dc.author.detail785707en_US


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