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dc.contributor.authorVan Gordon, William
dc.contributor.authorShonin, Edo
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-25T15:14:27Z
dc.date.available2020-02-25T15:14:27Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-15
dc.identifier.citationVan Gordon, W. and Shonin, E., (2019). 'Second-Generation Mindfulness-Based Interventions: Toward More Authentic Mindfulness Practice and Teaching'. Mindfulness, 11, pp. 1-4. DOI: 10.1007/s12671-019-01252-1en_US
dc.identifier.issn1868-8527
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12671-019-01252-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624520
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, a dialogue has emerged concerning the extent to which mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) teach and embody the essence of mindfulness according to longstanding conceptualizations of the technique. Traditionally, mindfulness was an integral component of a broad spectrum of contemplative practices, that when practiced collectively and correctly, reflected a rounded path of spiritual practice (Shonin et al. 2014). However, as part of its recent integration into various applied settings, it appears that some MBIs have largely isolated mindfulness from the techniques and practice principles that traditionally supported it. In such cases, a question that arises is whether mindfulness should still be called “mindfulness”, or whether in some of its modern interventional forms, it has been transposed into an “attention-based psychological technique” (Van Gordon et al. 2016). Regardless of the answer to this question, evidence from thousands of empirical studies suggest that this transposed technique has applications for improving health and human performance. Thus, the aforementioned dialogue has less to do with whether MBIs have demonstrable efficacy, and more to do with whether (i) there is sufficient transparency and scrutiny concerning the claims made by some MBI proponents regarding the authenticity of the technique they purport to teach, (ii) there are contexts in which a more traditional intervention-based form of mindfulness would be more appropriate or efficacious, and (iii) some prospective mindfulness practitioners would welcome more choice in terms of the degree to which an MBI follows the traditional practice model.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12671-019-01252-1en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://www.springer.com/tdm
dc.subjectApplied Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectExperimental and Cognitive Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental and Educational Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectHealth(social science)en_US
dc.subjectSocial Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectMindfulnessen_US
dc.titleSecond-generation mindfulness-based interventions: toward more authentic mindfulness practice and teachingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1868-8535
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalMindfulnessen_US
dc.identifier.pii1252
dc.source.journaltitleMindfulness
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage4
dcterms.dateAccepted2019
dc.author.detail785707en_US


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