Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLucas-Cuevas, Ángel G.
dc.contributor.authorPriego Quesada, Jose I
dc.contributor.authorGooding, Josh
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Martin
dc.contributor.authorEncarnación-Martínez, Alberto
dc.contributor.authorPerez-Soriano, Pedro
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-04T09:33:11Z
dc.date.available2019-11-04T09:33:11Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-15
dc.identifier.citationLucas-Cuevas, Á.G., Quesada, J.I.P., Gooding, J., Lewis, M.G., Encarnación-Martínez, A. and Perez-Soriano, P., (2018). 'The effect of visual focus on spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters of treadmill running'. Gait & posture, 59, pp, 292-297. DOI: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.07.039en_US
dc.identifier.issn0966-6362
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.07.039
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624288
dc.description.abstractThe characteristics of a treadmill and the environment where it is based could influence the user’s gaze and have an effect on their running kinematics and lower limb impacts. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of visual focus on spatio-temporal parameters and lower limb kinematics during treadmill running. Twenty six experienced runners ran at 3.33 m s−1 on a treadmill under two visual conditions, either looking ahead at a wall or looking down at the treadmill visual display. Spatio-temporal parameters, impact accelerations of the head and tibia, and knee and ankle kinematics were measured for the final 15 s of a 90 s bout of running under each condition. At the end of the test, participants reported their preference for the visual conditions assessed. Participants’ stride angle, flight time, knee flexion during the flight phase, and ankle eversion during contact time were increased when runners directed visual focus toward the wall compared to the treadmill display (p < 0.05). Whilst head acceleration was also increased in the wall condition (p < 0.05), the other acceleration parameters were unaffected (p > 0.05). However, the effect size of all biomechanical alterations was small. The Treadmill condition was the preferred condition by the participants (p < 0.001; ESw = 1.0). The results of the current study indicate that runners had a greater mass centre vertical displacement when they ran looking ahead, probably with the aim of compensating for reduced visual feedback, which resulted in larger head accelerations. Greater knee flexion during the flight phase and ankle eversion during the contact time were suggested as compensatory mechanisms for lower limb impacts.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0966636217307439en_US
dc.subjectBiophysicsen_US
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectOrthopedics and Sports Medicineen_US
dc.subjectBiomechanicsen_US
dc.subjectGaiten_US
dc.titleThe effect of visual focus on spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters of treadmill runningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNottingham Trent Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalGait & Postureen_US
dc.source.volume59
dc.source.beginpage292-297
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-07-11
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-15T00:00:00Z
dc.author.detail786762en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version
Thumbnail
Name:
Lucas-Cuevas et al 2017.pdf
Size:
770.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record