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dc.contributor.authorNunn, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorTepe-Belfrage, Daniela
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-31T10:15:14Z
dc.date.available2019-10-31T10:15:14Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-30
dc.identifier.citationNunn, A., and Tepe-Belfrage, D. (2019) 'Social reproduction strategies: understanding compound inequality in the intergenerational transfer of capital, assets and resources'. Capital and class, pp, 1-19. DOI: 10.1177/0309816819880795.en_US
dc.identifier.issn03098168
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0309816819880795
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624277
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses on the way that households respond to ‘global pressures’ by adapting their social reproduction strategies (SRS). We understand SRS to encapsulate the more or less consciously developed day-to-day and inter-generational responses to the social conditions that households confront and their own motivations and aspirations for the future. Yet, due to a range of extant inequalities of accumulated and dynamic resources – some of which are material and some of which are at once ethereal and embodied in the concrete labouring capacities of individuals – we argue that SRS and capacities to pursue them differ widely. Differences are conditioned by positionality, access to information and the construction of ‘economic imaginaries’ as well as material resources. By looking at these different expressions of SRS we highlight how they reinforce macro-scale socio-economic pressures, creating what we term ‘compound inequality’ into the future. Compound inequalities result from different behavioural responses to socio-economic conditions, inequality and (perceived or real) insecurity, which have the potential to exaggerate inequality and insecurity into the future. Inequalities do not just arise from formal economic markets then but also from the realm of social reproduction.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGEen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/journal/capital-classen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.sagepub.com/eprint/4HMS97XNXAPKPN5NUTUM/fullen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://livrepository.liverpool.ac.uk/3055313/en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectCultural Capitalen_US
dc.subjectSocial Mobilityen_US
dc.subjectInequalityen_US
dc.subjectSocial Reproductionen_US
dc.subjectSocial Reproduction Strategiesen_US
dc.subjectBourdieauen_US
dc.subjectMarxen_US
dc.subjectFeminismen_US
dc.subjectCompund Inequalityen_US
dc.titleSocial reproduction strategies: Understanding compound inequality in the intergenerational transfer of capital, assets and resourcesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn20410980
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Liverpoolen_US
dc.identifier.journalCapital and Classen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-20
refterms.dateFOA2019-10-31T10:15:14Z
dc.author.detail785344en_US


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