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dc.contributor.authorSchiffer, Christian
dc.contributor.authorPeace, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorPhethean, Jordan
dc.contributor.authorGernigon, Laurent
dc.contributor.authorMcCaffrey, Ken
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Kenni D.
dc.contributor.authorFoulger, Gillian
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-28T09:53:21Z
dc.date.available2019-10-28T09:53:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-01
dc.identifier.citationSchiffer, C., Peace, A., Phethean, J., Gernigon, L., McCaffrey, K.J.W., Petersen, K.D. and Foulger, G.R., (2018). 'The Jan Mayen microplate complex and the Wilson cycle'. In 'tectonic evolution: 50 years of the Wilson cycle concept'. Geological Society of London Special Publications, 470, pp, 1-38. DOI: 10.1144/sp470.2en_US
dc.identifier.issn0305-8719
dc.identifier.issn2041-4927
dc.identifier.doi10.1144/sp470.2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/624258
dc.description.abstractThe opening of the North Atlantic region was one of the most important geodynamic events that shaped the present day passive margins of Europe, Greenland and North America. Although well-studied, much remains to be understood about the evolution of the North Atlantic, including the role of the Jan Mayen microplate complex. Geophysical data provide an image of the crustal structure of this microplate and enable a detailed reconstruction of the rifting and spreading history. However, the mechanisms that cause the separation of microplates between conjugate margins are still poorly understood. We assemble recent models of rifting and passive margin formation in the North Atlantic and discuss possible scenarios that may have led to the formation of the Jan Mayen microplate complex. This event was probably triggered by regional plate tectonic reorganizations rejuvenating inherited structures. The axis of rifting and continental break-up and the width of the Jan Mayen microplate complex were controlled by old Caledonian fossil subduction/suture zones. Its length is related to east–west-oriented deformation and fracture zones, possibly linked to rheological heterogeneities inherited from the pre-existing Precambrian terrane boundaries.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherGeological Society of Londonen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://sp.lyellcollection.org/content/470/1/393en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://dro.dur.ac.uk/24044/en_US
dc.subjectGeologyen_US
dc.subjectOcean Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectWater Science and Technologyen_US
dc.titleThe Jan Mayen microplate complex and the Wilson cycleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDurham Universityen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMemorial University of Newfoundland, Canadaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeological Survey of NorwayLeiven_US
dc.contributor.departmentAarhus University8000 Aarhus, Denmarken_US
dc.identifier.journalGeological Society Special Publicationsen_US
dc.source.volume470
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage393-414
dcterms.dateAccepted2018
dc.author.detail786723en_US


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