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dc.contributor.authorAtkins, Liz
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-21T14:02:50Z
dc.date.available2019-06-21T14:02:50Z
dc.date.issued23/03/2016
dc.identifier.citationAtkins, L., (2016). 'Dis (en) abled: legitimating discriminatory practice in the name of inclusion?'. British Journal of Special Education, 43(1), pp.6-21. DOI: 10.1111/1467-8578.12123
dc.identifier.issn9523383
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-8578.12123
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623901
dc.description.abstractThis article explores tensions between the policies and practice of inclusion and the lived experiences of disabled young people in education. Drawing on the narratives of two young men who participated in a small pilot study, it utilises theoretical concepts related to disability, structure and agency, and power and control, as it explores the ways in which inclusion can create subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) forms of exclusion. Focusing on the young men's experiences of further and higher education, it is argued that inclusive practices and policies, however well intentioned, can create new and subtle forms of marginalisation through the structures and discourse intended to address exclusion. I conclude by questioning whether, in a diverse and disparate society, in which all our lives are defined by the extent to which we are more or less equal than others, inclusion can ever be anything other than an illusory concept.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/A
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1467-8578.12123
dc.titleDis(en)abled: legitimating discriminatory practice in the name of inclusion?
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.eissn14678578
dc.contributor.departmentNorthumbria University
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Special Education
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-25T13:17:37Z


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