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dc.contributor.authorPease, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-24T12:24:35Z
dc.date.available2019-04-24T12:24:35Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-05
dc.identifier.citationPease K. (2014) 'Voles Don't Take Taxis'. Legal and Criminological Psychology, 19(2), pp. 221-223. DOI: 10.1111/lcrp.12056.en_US
dc.identifier.issn13553259
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/lcrp.12056
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623683
dc.description.abstractJohnson’s paper advances understanding of sequences of burglaries committed by thesame offender. Furthermore, it has heuristic value in suggesting new avenues for applicable research. Each of the current data shortcomings represents an opportunity for novel research approaches, and the optimum forager metaphor holds continuing appeal as an organizing principle helpful to operational policing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/lcrp.12056en_US
dc.subjectBurglaryen_US
dc.subjectoptimal forageren_US
dc.subjectpredictive poliding, optimal forageren_US
dc.titleVoles don't take taxisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn20448333
dc.contributor.departmentLoughborough Universityen_US
dc.identifier.journalLegal and Criminological Psychologyen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-02-01
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-24T12:24:35Z
dc.author.detail786018en_US


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