Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorIgnatans, Dainis
dc.contributor.authorPease, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-24T12:08:57Z
dc.date.available2019-04-24T12:08:57Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.citationPease, K (2019) 'Are victims of crime mostly angry or mostly afraid?' Crime Prevention and Community Safety, pp. 1-11. (In press).en_US
dc.identifier.issn1460-3780
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623681
dc.description.abstractAnalysis of the Crime Survey for England and Wales identifies anger and annoyance rather than fear as the most common emotional responses to victimisation by crime, despite fear’s pre-eminence in the criminological literature. While the trend since 2003 shows an increase in fear relative to anger, anger remains more common for all crime categories and all levels of victim-rated offence seriousness. The writers contend that the mismatch between the preponderance of anger in victim accounts and the preponderance of fear in the academic literature is convenient for government and police. Subtly setting fear as the default ‘appropriate’ emotion to be evoked by victimisation makes for a populace less inclined to ‘take matters into its own hands’. Plans to develop research on victim anger are outlined.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer/ Palgraveen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.palgrave.com/gp/journal/41300/volumes-issues/latest-issueen_US
dc.subjectcrime, victim, anger, fearen_US
dc.titleAre victims of crime mostly angry or mostly afraid?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1743-4629
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalCrime Prevention and Community Safetyen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-02-26
dc.author.detail786018en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Anger Recent2.pdf
Size:
276.3Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Post print.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record