Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMacMahon, Barbara
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-10T15:08:08Z
dc.date.available2019-04-10T15:08:08Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-21
dc.identifier.citationMacMahon, B. (2018) 'Jane Austen, Free Indirect Style, Gender and Interiority in Literary Fiction'. In: Hopkins L. (eds) After Austen. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, pp, 221-243.en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-95894-1
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-95894-1_11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623660
dc.description.abstractIn this chapter I suggest that Jane Austen’s use of free indirect style has a far-reaching legacy in terms of establishing the form as central to a sense of literariness in prose fiction. More particularly, I argue that Austen’s use of language metarepresents the thoughts of female characters as a dynamic process of understanding themselves and their worlds. This coincides with a more general perception, construction and performance of ‘feminine’ thought and language use as hesitant, equivocal and spontaneous. I explore the influence of Austen’s style with close analysis and comparison of passages of interiority in Austen’s Mansfield Park, Katherine Mansfield’s short story ‘Millie’ and Monica Ali’s novel Brick Lane.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillanen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-95894-1_11#citeasen_US
dc.subjectFree indirect discourse, narrative point of view, metarepresentation, Austenen_US
dc.titleJane Austen free indirect style, gender and interiority in literary fictionen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-01-31
dc.author.detailBarbara MacMahonen_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record