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dc.contributor.authorFalconer, Caroline, J.
dc.contributor.authorLobmaier, Janek, S.
dc.contributor.authorCristoforou, Marina
dc.contributor.authorKamboj, Sunjeev, K.
dc.contributor.authorKing, John, A.
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.contributor.authorBrewin, Chris, R.
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-20T09:55:35Z
dc.date.available2019-03-20T09:55:35Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-23
dc.identifier.citationFalconer C. J., Lobmaier J. S., Christoforou M., et al. (2019) 'Compassionate faces: Evidence for distinctive facial expressions associated with specific prosocial motivations'. PLoS ONE 14(1), pp. 1-17. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0210283en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0210283
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623622
dc.description.abstractCompassion is a complex cognitive, emotional and behavioural process that has important real-world consequences for the self and others. Considering this, it is important to understand how compassion is communicated. The current research investigated the expression and perception of compassion via the face. We generated exemplar images of two compassionate facial expressions induced from two mental imagery tasks with different compassionate motivations (Study 1). Our kind- and empathic compassion faces were perceived differently and the empathic-compassion expression was perceived as best depicting the general definition of compassion (Study 2). Our two composite faces differed in their perceived happiness, kindness, sadness, fear and concern, which speak to their underling motivation and emotional resonance. Finally, both faces were accurately discriminated when presented along a compassion continuum (Study 3). Our results demonstrate two perceptually and functionally distinct facial expressions of compassion, with potentially different consequences for the suffering of others.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCRB, PG, JAK and CJF were supported (MR/J009210/1) by the UK Medical Research Council (https://mrc.ukri.org/). JSL was supported by a grant (PP00P1_163758/1) from the Swiss National Science Foundation (www.snf.ch). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPLoS ONEen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0210283en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectfaceen_US
dc.subjectemotionsen_US
dc.subjectface recognitionen_US
dc.subjectprototypesen_US
dc.subjectbehavioren_US
dc.subjecthappinessen_US
dc.subjectfearen_US
dc.subjectprosocial behavioren_US
dc.titleCompassionate faces: Evidence for distinctive facial expressions associated with specific prosocial motivationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, United Kingdomen_US
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Psychology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerlanden_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen_US
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-12-19
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-20T09:55:35Z


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