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dc.contributor.authorKirby, J
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-20T09:19:20Z
dc.date.available2019-03-20T09:19:20Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-09
dc.identifier.citationKirby, J.N. and Gilbert, P., (2019). 'Commentary Regarding Wilson et al.(2018)“Effectiveness of ‘Self-Compassion’Related Therapies: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.” All Is Not as It Seems'. Mindfulness, pp.1-11. DOI: 10.1007/s12671-018-1088-8.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1868-8535
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-018-1088-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623621
dc.description.abstractThis commentary paper reviews the recently made claims by Wilson et al. (Mindfulness, 2018) from their meta-analysis of what they call self-compassion therapies. They argue that a range of different therapy modalities can be classified as self-compassion therapies, including compassion-focused therapy, dialectical behaviour therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy and mindfulness-based interventions. The results from their meta-analyses found that these self-compassion therapies were effective at increasing self-compassion and reducing depressive and anxiety symptoms. This meta-analysis also found that self-compassion-related therapies did not produce better outcomes than active control conditions. This indicates that such self-compassion therapies are unlikely to have any specific effect over and above the general benefits of any active treatment. We will indicate a number of reasons why this conclusion is not warranted. We first contextualise what is meant by compassion-focused therapies, and we then discuss four key concerns: (1) the heterogeneity and classification of the “self-compassion therapies”; (2) the measure used to assess self-compassion; (3) the comparison to the active control conditions; and (4) the inaccurate comments made about the Kirby et al. (Behavior Therapy, 2017b) meta-analysis. Although it is encouraging to see the increasing number of randomised controlled trials, and now meta-analyses of compassion-focused therapies, the conclusions made by Wilson et al. (Mindfulness, 2018) in their meta-analysis are misleading.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer USen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12671-018-1088-8en_US
dc.subjectCompassionen_US
dc.subjectCompassion-focused therapyen_US
dc.subjectSelf-compassionen_US
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen_US
dc.titleCommentary Regarding Wilson et al. (2018) 'Effectiveness of ‘Self-Compassion’ Related Therapies: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.” All Is Not as It Seemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCompassionate Mind Research Group, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane 4072, Australiaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Derby, Derby, UKen_US
dc.identifier.journalMindfulnessen_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-12-28
dc.author.detailVchi583en_US


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