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dc.contributor.authorJennings, Will
dc.contributor.authorFarrall, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorGray, Emily
dc.contributor.authorHay, Colin
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-01T15:03:20Z
dc.date.available2019-02-01T15:03:20Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-02
dc.identifier.citationJennings, W., Farrall, S., Gray, E. and Hay, C., (2017). 'Penal populism and the public thermostat: Crime, public punitiveness, and public policy'. Governance, 30(3), pp.463-481. DOI: 10.1111/gove.12214.en_US
dc.identifier.issn09521895
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/gove.12214
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623476
dc.description.abstractThis article makes the case that feedback processes in democratic politics—between crime rates, public opinion, and public policy—can account for the growth of penal populism in Britain. It argues that the public recognize and respond to rising (and falling) levels of crime, and that in turn public support for being tough on crime is translated into patterns of imprisonment. This contributes to debates over the crime–opinion–policy connection, unpacking the dynamic processes by which these relationships unfold at the aggregate level. This uses the most extensive data set ever assembled on aggregate opinion on crime in Britain to construct a new over‐time measure of punitive attitudes. The analysis first tests the thermostatic responsiveness of punitive attitudes to changes in recorded crime rates as well as self‐reported victimization, and then examines the degree to which changes in mass opinion impact on criminal justice policy.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipESRCen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/gove.12214en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/97893/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Governanceen
dc.subjectThatcherismen_US
dc.subjectCrimeen_US
dc.titlePenal populism and the public thermostat: crime, public punitiveness, and public policy.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffielden_US
dc.identifier.journalGovernanceen_US
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Politics & International Relations; University of Southampton
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Criminological Research; University of Sheffield
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Criminological Research; University of Sheffield
dc.contributor.institutionSciences Po; Paris


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