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dc.contributor.authorHirtenlehner, Helmut
dc.contributor.authorFarrall, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-30T13:48:46Z
dc.date.available2019-01-30T13:48:46Z
dc.date.issued2014-08-02
dc.identifier.citationHirtenlehner, H., and Farrall, S. (2014) 'Is the ‘shadow of sexual assault’ responsible for women’s higher fear of burglary?', British Journal of Criminology, 54(6), pp. 1167-1185.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-0955
dc.identifier.issn1464-3529
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjc/azu054
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623448
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the ‘shadow of sexual assault hypothesis’ which posits that women’s higher fear of crime, compared to males, can be attributed to their elevated fear of sexual victimization. We argue that the previous, overwhelmingly supportive, research on this issue is incomplete in three ways: (1) the thesis has not yet been extensively tested outside of North America, (2) competing, possibly overlaying, shadow effects of physical violence have widely been ignored and (3) perceptually contemporaneous offences have always been measured in an indirect manner. Drawing on the example of fear of burglary, this work tackles the afore-mentioned deficiencies. Results from a crime survey conducted in the United Kingdom indicate that, when relying on a rather traditional test strategy, the ‘shadow of sexual assault hypothesis’ is supported. However, the findings are highly contingent on the employed methodology. When utilizing direct measures of perceptually contemporaneous offences, only physical, not sexual, assault turns out to cast a shadow over fear of burglary. The impact of fear of rape would appear to be reduced considerably once fear of broader physical harm is taken into account. We conclude that much of the existing evidence for the shadow thesis can be challenged on the grounds of failing to control for the effects of non-sexual physical assault and drawing on an inadequate operationalization of perceptually contemporaneous offences.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/bjc/article/54/6/1167/395401en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Journal of Criminologyen
dc.subjectfear of crimeen_US
dc.subjectSexual assaulten_US
dc.titleIs the ‘shadow of sexual assault’ responsible for women’s higher fear of burglary?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffielden_US
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Criminologyen_US
dc.dateAccepted2014


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