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dc.contributor.authorGodsmark, Oliver
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-21T12:50:09Z
dc.date.available2019-01-21T12:50:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-05
dc.identifier.citationGodsmark, O. (2018) Citizenship, community and democracy in India: from Bombay to Maharashtra, c. 1930 to 1960. London & New York: Routledge.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780815393627
dc.identifier.isbn9781351188234
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623336
dc.description.abstractThis book delivers ground-breaking perspectives upon nascent conceptions and workings of citizenship and democracy during the colonial/postcolonial transition. It examines how processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years contributed to demands and concerns and offers a broadened and imaginative outlook on India’s partition. Drawing upon a novel body of archival research, the book ultimately suggests Pakistan might also be considered as just one paradigmatic example of a range of coterminous calls for regional autonomy and statehood, informed by a majoritarian democratic logic that had an extensive contemporary circulation. It will be of interest to academics in the fields of South Asian history in general and the Partition in particular as well as to those interested in British colonialism and postcolonial studies.
dc.description.sponsorshipEconomic History Society; Indian National Trust of Art and Cultural Heritage; Royal Historical Societyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/Citizenship-Community-and-Democracy-in-India-From-Bombay-to-Maharashtra/Godsmark/p/book/9780815393627en
dc.subjectcitizenshipen
dc.subjectcommunityen
dc.subjectdemocracyen
dc.subjectIndiaen
dc.subjectMaharashtraen
dc.subjectBombayen
dc.subjectSouth Asiaen
dc.subjectlanguageen
dc.subjectcasteen
dc.subjectregionen
dc.titleCitizenship, community and democracy in India: from Bombay to Maharashtra, c. 1930 to 1960.en
dc.typeBooken
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffielden
html.description.abstractThis book delivers ground-breaking perspectives upon nascent conceptions and workings of citizenship and democracy during the colonial/postcolonial transition. It examines how processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years contributed to demands and concerns and offers a broadened and imaginative outlook on India’s partition. Drawing upon a novel body of archival research, the book ultimately suggests Pakistan might also be considered as just one paradigmatic example of a range of coterminous calls for regional autonomy and statehood, informed by a majoritarian democratic logic that had an extensive contemporary circulation. It will be of interest to academics in the fields of South Asian history in general and the Partition in particular as well as to those interested in British colonialism and postcolonial studies.


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