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dc.contributor.authorRöthig, Till
dc.contributor.authorRoik, Anna
dc.contributor.authorYum, Lauren K.
dc.contributor.authorVoolstra, Christian R.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-15T15:17:15Z
dc.date.available2019-01-15T15:17:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-10
dc.identifier.citationRöthig T. et al. (2017) ‘Distinct bacterial microbiomes associate with the deep-sea coral Eguchipsammia fistula from the Red Sea and from aquaria settings’ Frontiers in Marine Science, 4: 259. Doi: 10.3389/fmars.2017.00259en
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmars.2017.00259
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623302
dc.description.abstractMicrobial communities associated with deep-sea corals are beginning to be studied in earnest and the contribution of the microbiome to host organismal function remains to be investigated. In this regard, the ability of the microbiome to adjust to prevailing environmental conditions might provide clues to its functional importance. In this study, we characterized bacterial community composition associated with the deep-sea coral Eguchipsammia fistula under natural (in situ) and aquaria (ex situ) settings using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. We compared freshly collected Red Sea coral specimens with those reared for >1 year at conditions that partially differed from the natural environment, in particular regarding increased oxygen and food availability under ex situ conditions. We found substantial differences between the microbiomes associated with corals under both environmental settings. The core microbiome comprised only six bacterial taxa consistently present in all corals, whereas the majority of bacteria were exclusively associated either with freshly collected corals or corals under long-term reared aquaria settings. Putative functional profiling of microbial communities showed that corals in their natural habitat were enriched for processes indicative of a carbon- and nitrogen-limited environment, which might be reflective of differences in diet under in situ and ex situ conditions. The ability of E. fistula to harbor distinct microbiomes under different environmental settings might contribute to the flexibility and phenotypic plasticity of this cosmopolitan coral. Future efforts should further assess the role of these different bacteria in holobiont function, in particular since E. fistula is naturally present in markedly different environments.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by baseline funds to CRV by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and by the Center Competitive Funding (CCF) Program FCC/1/1973-18-01.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmars.2017.00259/fullen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Frontiers in Marine Scienceen
dc.subjectDeep Sea Coralen
dc.subjectMicrobiomeen
dc.titleDistinct bacterial microbiomes associate with the deep-sea coral Eguchipsammia fistula from the Red Sea and from aquaria settings.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2296-7745
dc.contributor.departmentKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Marine Scienceen
dc.dateAccepted2017-07-28
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T18:04:42Z
html.description.abstractMicrobial communities associated with deep-sea corals are beginning to be studied in earnest and the contribution of the microbiome to host organismal function remains to be investigated. In this regard, the ability of the microbiome to adjust to prevailing environmental conditions might provide clues to its functional importance. In this study, we characterized bacterial community composition associated with the deep-sea coral Eguchipsammia fistula under natural (in situ) and aquaria (ex situ) settings using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. We compared freshly collected Red Sea coral specimens with those reared for >1 year at conditions that partially differed from the natural environment, in particular regarding increased oxygen and food availability under ex situ conditions. We found substantial differences between the microbiomes associated with corals under both environmental settings. The core microbiome comprised only six bacterial taxa consistently present in all corals, whereas the majority of bacteria were exclusively associated either with freshly collected corals or corals under long-term reared aquaria settings. Putative functional profiling of microbial communities showed that corals in their natural habitat were enriched for processes indicative of a carbon- and nitrogen-limited environment, which might be reflective of differences in diet under in situ and ex situ conditions. The ability of E. fistula to harbor distinct microbiomes under different environmental settings might contribute to the flexibility and phenotypic plasticity of this cosmopolitan coral. Future efforts should further assess the role of these different bacteria in holobiont function, in particular since E. fistula is naturally present in markedly different environments.


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