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dc.contributor.authorBarnard, K. D.
dc.contributor.authorDyson, P.
dc.contributor.authorSinclair, J. M. A.
dc.contributor.authorLawton, J.
dc.contributor.authorAnthony, Denis
dc.contributor.authorCranston, M.
dc.contributor.authorHolt, R. I. G.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-11T16:05:41Z
dc.date.available2019-01-11T16:05:41Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-13
dc.identifier.citationBarnard, K.D., et al., (2014). Alcohol health literacy in young adults with type 1 diabetes and its impact on diabetes management. Diabetic Medicine, 31(12), pp.1625-1630.en
dc.identifier.issn07423071
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/dme.12491
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623284
dc.description.abstractAIMS: To investigate the knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content of commonly consumed alcoholic drinks among young adults with Type 1 diabetes and to explore alcohol consumption while identifying diabetes self-management strategies used to minimize alcohol-associated risk. METHOD: We conducted an open-access, multiple-choice web survey to investigate knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content of typical alcoholic drinks using images. Respondents to the survey also recorded their current alcohol consumption and diabetes self-management strategies when drinking. RESULTS: A total of 547 people aged 18-30 years responded to the survey (341 women; 192 men; mean (sd) age 24.5 (3.7) years), of whom 365 (66.7%) drank alcohol. In all, 84 (32.9%) women and 31 (22.6%) men scored higher than the cut-off score for increased-risk drinking. Knowledge accuracy of alcohol units was poor: only 7.3% (n = 40) correctly identified the alcohol content of six or more out of 10 drinks. Knowledge of carbohydrate content was also poor: no respondent correctly identified the carbohydrate content of six or more out of 10 drinks. Various and inconsistent strategies to minimize alcohol-associated risk were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption was common among the survey respondents, but knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content was poor. Greater alcohol-related health literacy is required to minimize alcohol-associated risk. Further research should help develop effective strategies to improve health literacy and support safe drinking for young adults with Type 1 diabetes.
dc.description.sponsorshipDiabetes UKen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/dme.12491en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Diabetic Medicineen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectDiabetesen
dc.titleAlcohol health literacy in young adults with Type 1 diabetes and its impact on diabetes management.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Leedsen
dc.identifier.journalDiabetic Medicineen
dc.contributor.institutionHuman Development and Health Academic Unit; Faculty of Medicine; University of Southampton; Southampton UK
dc.contributor.institutionOCDEM; University of Oxford; OCDEM Churchill Hospital; Oxford UK
dc.contributor.institutionClinical and Experimental Sciences Academic Unit; Faculty of Medicine; University of Southampton; Southampton UK
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Population Health Sciences; University of Edinburgh; Edinburgh UK
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Healthcare; University of Leeds; Leeds UK
dc.contributor.institutionHuman Development and Health Academic Unit; Faculty of Medicine; University of Southampton; Southampton UK
dc.contributor.institutionHuman Development and Health Academic Unit; Faculty of Medicine; University of Southampton; Southampton UK
dc.dateAccepted2014-05-09
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T18:03:21Z
html.description.abstractAIMS: To investigate the knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content of commonly consumed alcoholic drinks among young adults with Type 1 diabetes and to explore alcohol consumption while identifying diabetes self-management strategies used to minimize alcohol-associated risk. METHOD: We conducted an open-access, multiple-choice web survey to investigate knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content of typical alcoholic drinks using images. Respondents to the survey also recorded their current alcohol consumption and diabetes self-management strategies when drinking. RESULTS: A total of 547 people aged 18-30 years responded to the survey (341 women; 192 men; mean (sd) age 24.5 (3.7) years), of whom 365 (66.7%) drank alcohol. In all, 84 (32.9%) women and 31 (22.6%) men scored higher than the cut-off score for increased-risk drinking. Knowledge accuracy of alcohol units was poor: only 7.3% (n = 40) correctly identified the alcohol content of six or more out of 10 drinks. Knowledge of carbohydrate content was also poor: no respondent correctly identified the carbohydrate content of six or more out of 10 drinks. Various and inconsistent strategies to minimize alcohol-associated risk were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption was common among the survey respondents, but knowledge of alcohol and carbohydrate content was poor. Greater alcohol-related health literacy is required to minimize alcohol-associated risk. Further research should help develop effective strategies to improve health literacy and support safe drinking for young adults with Type 1 diabetes.


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