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dc.contributor.authorApergis, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-11T14:05:51Z
dc.date.available2019-01-11T14:05:51Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-14
dc.identifier.citationApergis, N. (2016) ‘The impact of greenhouse gas emissions on personal well-being: evidence from a panel of 58 countries and aggregate and regional country samples’, Journal of Happiness Studies, 19 (1), pp. 69–80. Doi: 10.1007/s10902-016-9809-yen
dc.identifier.issn1389-4978
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10902-016-9809-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623282
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the link between personal well-being and per capita greenhouse gas emissions by considering a panel data methodological approach. The empirical findings illustrate that there is a significant effect of those emissions on personal well-being through the aggregate country sample. A robust finding is that similar results hold across regional samples, with the strongest effect being displayed in the case of the European regional component. The empirical findings are expected to carry important implications for consumers, corporations, and economic policy makers who all must take explicitly into consideration the impact of their economic decisions on the sustainability of economic growth plans.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPersonal well-beingen
dc.subjectGreenhouse effectsen
dc.subject58 countriesen
dc.subjectPanel methodologiesen
dc.titleThe impact of greenhouse gas emissions on personal well-being: evidence from a panel of 58 countries and aggregate and regional country samples.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1573-7780
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Piraeusen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Happiness Studiesen
html.description.abstractThis study investigates the link between personal well-being and per capita greenhouse gas emissions by considering a panel data methodological approach. The empirical findings illustrate that there is a significant effect of those emissions on personal well-being through the aggregate country sample. A robust finding is that similar results hold across regional samples, with the strongest effect being displayed in the case of the European regional component. The empirical findings are expected to carry important implications for consumers, corporations, and economic policy makers who all must take explicitly into consideration the impact of their economic decisions on the sustainability of economic growth plans.


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