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dc.contributor.authorCayli, Baris
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-21T13:40:37Z
dc.date.available2018-12-21T13:40:37Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-15
dc.identifier.citationCayli, B. (2018) ‘Crime, bandits, and community: how public panic shaped the social control of territory in the Ottoman Empire’, Territory, Politics, Governance. doi: 10.1080/21622671.2018.1557074en
dc.identifier.issn2162-2671
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/21622671.2018.1557074
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623249
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the role of crime, bandits, and public panic in in the nineteenth century Ottoman society by using archival documents and employing a comparative perspective. In addition to the social bandit concept of Eric Hobsbawm, there is an introduction of two new banditry forms in this study—opportunist bandits and imagined bandits. The comparison of different bandit forms clarifies that social bandits and opportunist bandits aggravated public panic and produced imagined bandits. Hence, public panic and the dissent of local people unveiled through rumors about the imagined bandits. The exploration of different forms of bandits in the Ottoman Empire is a response to the vexed issue concerning the challenges in the social control of territories in a multiethnic and multi-religious empire. This study provides new conceptual tools to rethink about the spatial dimensions in the emergence of bandits. This article shows that spatial factors in the social control of territory can be influenced by the reaction of local people from bottom-to-top and, in doing so, can determine the response of state authority. The present study, therefore, unveils the power relationship in the social control of territory whether it is manifested by physical force or public panic.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=rtep20en
dc.subjectCrimeen
dc.subjectBanditsen
dc.titleCrime, bandits, and community: how public panic shaped the social control of territory in the Ottoman Empireen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2162-268X
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalTerritory, Politics, Governanceen
dc.internal.reviewer-note28/11/2018 NYP SER 18 month embargo https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rtep20/currenten
dc.dateAccepted2018-11-27
html.description.abstractThis study explores the role of crime, bandits, and public panic in in the nineteenth century Ottoman society by using archival documents and employing a comparative perspective. In addition to the social bandit concept of Eric Hobsbawm, there is an introduction of two new banditry forms in this study—opportunist bandits and imagined bandits. The comparison of different bandit forms clarifies that social bandits and opportunist bandits aggravated public panic and produced imagined bandits. Hence, public panic and the dissent of local people unveiled through rumors about the imagined bandits. The exploration of different forms of bandits in the Ottoman Empire is a response to the vexed issue concerning the challenges in the social control of territories in a multiethnic and multi-religious empire. This study provides new conceptual tools to rethink about the spatial dimensions in the emergence of bandits. This article shows that spatial factors in the social control of territory can be influenced by the reaction of local people from bottom-to-top and, in doing so, can determine the response of state authority. The present study, therefore, unveils the power relationship in the social control of territory whether it is manifested by physical force or public panic.


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