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dc.contributor.authorAdlington Martin*
dc.contributor.authorCeranic, Boris*
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-29T15:36:36Z
dc.date.available2018-10-29T15:36:36Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.identifier.citationAdlington M., Ceranic B. (2018) ‘A critical review of the impact of global warming on overheating In Buildings’, paper presented at the7th Global Conference on Global Warming, Izmir, Turkey, 24-28 June.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623086
dc.description.abstractOver the last century global average temperatures have increased up to 1°F. Indeed, since records of comprehensive global temperatures were available as early as 1880, the evidence suggests that 2001-2010 decade has been shown to be the warmest. This change is having a direct impact in terms of an increase in extremely hot days and warm nights and a decrease in cold days. Evidence suggests that different parts of the world are warming at a faster rate than others. However, research predicts that the long-term impact of global warming is only set to increase. One of the major contributors of global warming is the impact of carbon emissions and in an effort to reduce these emissions the UK Government implemented changes to UK regulations, such as Part L conservation of heat and power that dictates improved thermal insulation and enhanced air tightness. The UK is fully committed to achieving its carbon targets under the climate Change Act 2008. However, there is a caveat that comes with these changes, as coupled with climate change they are likely to exacerbate the problem of overheating in buildings. And because of this growing problem the health effects on occupants of these buildings may well be an issue. Increases in temperature can perhaps have a direct impact on the human body’s ability to retain thermoregulation and therefore the effects of heat related illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat syncope and even death can be imminent. This review paper presents a comprehensive evaluation of current literature on the impact of global warming/climate change on overheating in buildings. Firstly, an overview of the topic will be presented followed by an examination of global warming/overheating research work from the last decade. These papers will form the body of the article and will be grouped into a framework matrix summarising the source material identifying the differing methods of analysis of the impact of global warming on overheating. Cross case evaluation will identify systematic relationships between different variables within the matrix.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectGlobal Warmingen
dc.subjectClimate Changeen
dc.subjectOverheatingen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.titleA critical review of the impact of global warming on overheating in buildings.en
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T17:44:45Z
html.description.abstractOver the last century global average temperatures have increased up to 1°F. Indeed, since records of comprehensive global temperatures were available as early as 1880, the evidence suggests that 2001-2010 decade has been shown to be the warmest. This change is having a direct impact in terms of an increase in extremely hot days and warm nights and a decrease in cold days. Evidence suggests that different parts of the world are warming at a faster rate than others. However, research predicts that the long-term impact of global warming is only set to increase. One of the major contributors of global warming is the impact of carbon emissions and in an effort to reduce these emissions the UK Government implemented changes to UK regulations, such as Part L conservation of heat and power that dictates improved thermal insulation and enhanced air tightness. The UK is fully committed to achieving its carbon targets under the climate Change Act 2008. However, there is a caveat that comes with these changes, as coupled with climate change they are likely to exacerbate the problem of overheating in buildings. And because of this growing problem the health effects on occupants of these buildings may well be an issue. Increases in temperature can perhaps have a direct impact on the human body’s ability to retain thermoregulation and therefore the effects of heat related illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat syncope and even death can be imminent. This review paper presents a comprehensive evaluation of current literature on the impact of global warming/climate change on overheating in buildings. Firstly, an overview of the topic will be presented followed by an examination of global warming/overheating research work from the last decade. These papers will form the body of the article and will be grouped into a framework matrix summarising the source material identifying the differing methods of analysis of the impact of global warming on overheating. Cross case evaluation will identify systematic relationships between different variables within the matrix.


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