Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSimonovic, Boban
dc.contributor.authorStupple, Edward J. N.
dc.contributor.authorGale, Maggie
dc.contributor.authorSheffield, David
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-04T14:37:34Z
dc.date.available2018-10-04T14:37:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-28
dc.identifier.citationSimonovic B, Stupple E.J.N., Gale M and Sheffield D. (2018) Performance under stress: an eye-tracking investigation of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). Front. Behav. Neurosci. 12:217. doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00217en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623014
dc.description.abstractStress pervades everyday life and impedes risky decision making. The following experiment is the first to examine effects of stress on risky decision making in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), while measuring inspection time and conscious awareness of deck contingencies. This was original as it allowed a fine grained rigorous analysis of the way that stress impedes awareness of, and attention to maladaptive financial choices. The extended Cognitive Reflection Task (CRT) further afforded examination of the impact of impaired reflective thinking on risky decision making. Stressed participants were slower to avoid the disadvantageous decks and performed worse overall. They inspected disadvantageous decks for longer than the control condition and were slower in developing awareness of their poor deck quality compared to the control condition. Conversely, in the control condition greater inspection times for advantageous decks were observed earlier in the task, and better awareness of the deck contingencies was shown as early as the second block of trials than the stress condition. Path analysis suggested that stress reduced IGT performance by impeding reflective thinking and conscious awareness. Explicit cognitive processes, moreover, were important during the preliminary phase of IGT performance—a finding that has significant implications for the use of the IGT as a clinical diagnostic tool. It was concluded that stress impedes reflective thinking, attentional disengagement from poorer decks, and the development of conscious knowledge about choice quality that interferes with performance on the IGT. These data demonstrate that stress impairs risky decision making performance, by impeding attention to, and awareness of task characteristics in risky decision making.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00217/fullen
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subjectDecision makingen
dc.titlePerformance under stress: an eye-tracking investigation of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT).en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1662-5153
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscienceen
html.description.abstractStress pervades everyday life and impedes risky decision making. The following experiment is the first to examine effects of stress on risky decision making in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), while measuring inspection time and conscious awareness of deck contingencies. This was original as it allowed a fine grained rigorous analysis of the way that stress impedes awareness of, and attention to maladaptive financial choices. The extended Cognitive Reflection Task (CRT) further afforded examination of the impact of impaired reflective thinking on risky decision making. Stressed participants were slower to avoid the disadvantageous decks and performed worse overall. They inspected disadvantageous decks for longer than the control condition and were slower in developing awareness of their poor deck quality compared to the control condition. Conversely, in the control condition greater inspection times for advantageous decks were observed earlier in the task, and better awareness of the deck contingencies was shown as early as the second block of trials than the stress condition. Path analysis suggested that stress reduced IGT performance by impeding reflective thinking and conscious awareness. Explicit cognitive processes, moreover, were important during the preliminary phase of IGT performance—a finding that has significant implications for the use of the IGT as a clinical diagnostic tool. It was concluded that stress impedes reflective thinking, attentional disengagement from poorer decks, and the development of conscious knowledge about choice quality that interferes with performance on the IGT. These data demonstrate that stress impairs risky decision making performance, by impeding attention to, and awareness of task characteristics in risky decision making.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record