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dc.contributor.authorDimitrellou, Eleni
dc.contributor.authorHurry, Jane
dc.contributor.authorMale, Dawn
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-02T13:40:35Z
dc.date.available2018-10-02T13:40:35Z
dc.date.issued2018-08-21
dc.identifier.citationDimitrellou, E., Hurry, J., & Male, D (2018) Assessing the inclusivity of three mainstream secondary schools in England: challenges and dilemmas, International Journal of Inclusive Education, DOI: 10.1080/13603116.2018.1511757en
dc.identifier.issn1360-3116
dc.identifier.issn1464-5173
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13603116.2018.1511757
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623006
dc.description.abstractThe notion of inclusion has gained momentum worldwide, with most countries around the world embracing inclusive policies in their educational systems. However, there is still an ongoing debate as to what is inclusion and hence, the consequent challenge of coming up with an agreed definition, which could then be used to plan for and subsequently, evaluate, inclusion. This study adds to our understanding of inclusion by contrasting objective (i.e. School Census Statistics) and subjective (i.e. self- report questionnaire) measures of inclusivity in three mainstream secondary schools in England and by comparing the perceptions of school inclusivity of different groups of educational practitioners and pupils. The results of this study indicate that inclusion is a ‘slippery’ construct as the perception of inclusion of educational practitioners was found to be affected by their role at school while pupil perception on this matter depended upon their SEND category. However, despite these subjective differences in the way inclusion is perceived, there was also substantial agreement across the different categories of participants with regard to the relative ranking of inclusivity across the three schools suggesting that coming up with overarching themes on what is inclusion is achievable. The article ends with explaining the benefits of reaching an agreed definition at a national level.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13603116.2018.1511757en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Inclusive Educationen
dc.subjectInclusive educationen
dc.subjectdefinitions of inclusionen
dc.subjectEnglanden
dc.subjectmeasures of inclusionen
dc.subjectspecial educational needsen
dc.subjectviewsen
dc.titleAssessing the inclusivity of three mainstream secondary schools in England: challenges and dilemmasen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Inclusive Educationen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Education, University of Derby, Derby, UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK
dc.internal.reviewer-noteNo prepublication.en
dc.date.accepted2018-08-07
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T17:31:32Z
html.description.abstractThe notion of inclusion has gained momentum worldwide, with most countries around the world embracing inclusive policies in their educational systems. However, there is still an ongoing debate as to what is inclusion and hence, the consequent challenge of coming up with an agreed definition, which could then be used to plan for and subsequently, evaluate, inclusion. This study adds to our understanding of inclusion by contrasting objective (i.e. School Census Statistics) and subjective (i.e. self- report questionnaire) measures of inclusivity in three mainstream secondary schools in England and by comparing the perceptions of school inclusivity of different groups of educational practitioners and pupils. The results of this study indicate that inclusion is a ‘slippery’ construct as the perception of inclusion of educational practitioners was found to be affected by their role at school while pupil perception on this matter depended upon their SEND category. However, despite these subjective differences in the way inclusion is perceived, there was also substantial agreement across the different categories of participants with regard to the relative ranking of inclusivity across the three schools suggesting that coming up with overarching themes on what is inclusion is achievable. The article ends with explaining the benefits of reaching an agreed definition at a national level.


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