Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHughes, Joelene
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Miles
dc.contributor.authorLumber, Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-02T11:44:41Z
dc.date.available2018-10-02T11:44:41Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-25
dc.identifier.citationHughes, J., Richardson, M., Lumber, R. (2018) 'Evaluating connection to nature and the relationship with conservation behaviour in children', Journal for Nature Conservation, 45(11), pp. 11-19. doi: 10.1016/j.jnc.2018.07.004.en
dc.identifier.issn16171381
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jnc.2018.07.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/623004
dc.description.abstract‘Connection to nature’ is a multidimensional trait thought to be important for developing positive conservation behaviours, and strengthening people’s connection to nature has become the focus for many conservation activities. A connection to nature may be developed through repeated engagement with nature, and experiences during childhood are thought to be particularly significant. However, many children today are considered to have a low connection to nature, presenting a critical challenge for the future of nature conservation. Several instruments have been developed for measuring connection to nature. These instruments are important for establishing current levels and thresholds of connection and evaluating efforts to improve connection, yet the way the instruments and the derived scores relate to the term ‘connection’ frequently used in conservation discourse has, so far, been overlooked. In this study, we interrogate Cheng et al.’s (2012) Connection to Nature Index (CNI) and develop a refined “gradient of connection” based on the instrument structure, proposing boundaries of low (below 4.06), mild (between 4.06 and 4.56) and strong (over 4.56) connection that are relevant for conservation activities. Furthermore, we show how the suggested boundaries relate to self-reported conservation behaviours with a high probability of performing behaviours (>70%) only reached at strong levels of connection. Our data show that, in agreement with current perceptions, the population of UK children surveyed have a low connection to nature and are unlikely to be performing many conservation behaviours. This demonstrates how the index can be used to measure and evaluate connection in populations in a way that will enhance future conservation efforts.
dc.description.sponsorshipn/aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttps://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1617138118300268en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal for Nature Conservationen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectNature connectednessen
dc.subjectConservationen
dc.titleEvaluating connection to nature and the relationship with conservation behaviour in childrenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal Society for the Protection of Birdsen
dc.contributor.departmentDe Montfort Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal for Nature Conservationen
html.description.abstract‘Connection to nature’ is a multidimensional trait thought to be important for developing positive conservation behaviours, and strengthening people’s connection to nature has become the focus for many conservation activities. A connection to nature may be developed through repeated engagement with nature, and experiences during childhood are thought to be particularly significant. However, many children today are considered to have a low connection to nature, presenting a critical challenge for the future of nature conservation. Several instruments have been developed for measuring connection to nature. These instruments are important for establishing current levels and thresholds of connection and evaluating efforts to improve connection, yet the way the instruments and the derived scores relate to the term ‘connection’ frequently used in conservation discourse has, so far, been overlooked. In this study, we interrogate Cheng et al.’s (2012) Connection to Nature Index (CNI) and develop a refined “gradient of connection” based on the instrument structure, proposing boundaries of low (below 4.06), mild (between 4.06 and 4.56) and strong (over 4.56) connection that are relevant for conservation activities. Furthermore, we show how the suggested boundaries relate to self-reported conservation behaviours with a high probability of performing behaviours (>70%) only reached at strong levels of connection. Our data show that, in agreement with current perceptions, the population of UK children surveyed have a low connection to nature and are unlikely to be performing many conservation behaviours. This demonstrates how the index can be used to measure and evaluate connection in populations in a way that will enhance future conservation efforts.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Publisher version
Thumbnail
Name:
Hughes et al J Nat Cons_ Postprint ...
Embargo:
2020-07-25
Size:
997.7Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
post-print

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Archived with thanks to Journal for Nature Conservation
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Archived with thanks to Journal for Nature Conservation