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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Nicholas S. G.
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Mark W.
dc.contributor.authorVesk, Peter A.
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorHahs, Amy K.
dc.contributor.authorClemants, Steven E.
dc.contributor.authorCorlett, Richard T.
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Richard P.
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Briony, A.
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Ken
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Mark J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-14T09:08:56Z
dc.date.available2018-09-14T09:08:56Z
dc.date.issued2009-01
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, N. S. G. et al (2009) 'A conceptual framework for predicting the effects of urban environments on floras', Journal of Ecology, 97 (1):4 .en
dc.identifier.issn00220477
dc.identifier.issn13652745
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2745.2008.01460.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622981
dc.description.abstract1 With the majority of people now living in urban environments, urbanization is arguably the most intensive and irreversible ecosystem change on the planet. 2 Urbanization transforms floras through a series of filters that change: (i) habitat availability; (ii) the spatial arrangement of habitats; (iii) the pool of plant species; and (iv) evolutionary selection pressures on populations persisting in the urban environment. 3 Using a framework based on mechanisms of change leads to specific predictions of floristic change in urban environments. Explicitly linking drivers of floristic change to predicted outcomes in urban areas can facilitate sustainable management of urban vegetation as well as the conservation of biodiversity. 4 Synthesis. We outline how the use of our proposed framework, based on environmental filtering, can be used to predict responses of floras to urbanization. These floristic responses can be assessed using metrics of taxonomic composition, phylogenetic relatedness among species, plant trait distributions or plant community structure. We outline how this framework can be applied to studies that compare floras within cities or among cities to better understand the various floristic responses to urbanization.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe working group was funded by the ARC‐NZ Research Network for Vegetation Function. Financial support was also provided by The Baker Foundation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Ecological Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1365-2745.2008.01460.xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Ecologyen
dc.subjectCommunity phylogeneticsen
dc.subjectExtinctionen
dc.subjectFragmentationen
dc.subjectHabitat lossen
dc.subjectInvasionen
dc.subjectPlant traitsen
dc.subjectSelectionen
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subjectSustainabilityen
dc.subjectUrbanizationen
dc.titleA conceptual framework for predicting the effects of urban environments on floras.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal Botanic Gardens Melbourneen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Melbourneen
dc.contributor.departmentBrooklyn Botanic Gardensen
dc.contributor.departmentNational University of Singaporeen
dc.contributor.departmentLincoln Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sheffielden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Ecologyen
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-28T17:30:11Z
html.description.abstract1 With the majority of people now living in urban environments, urbanization is arguably the most intensive and irreversible ecosystem change on the planet. 2 Urbanization transforms floras through a series of filters that change: (i) habitat availability; (ii) the spatial arrangement of habitats; (iii) the pool of plant species; and (iv) evolutionary selection pressures on populations persisting in the urban environment. 3 Using a framework based on mechanisms of change leads to specific predictions of floristic change in urban environments. Explicitly linking drivers of floristic change to predicted outcomes in urban areas can facilitate sustainable management of urban vegetation as well as the conservation of biodiversity. 4 Synthesis. We outline how the use of our proposed framework, based on environmental filtering, can be used to predict responses of floras to urbanization. These floristic responses can be assessed using metrics of taxonomic composition, phylogenetic relatedness among species, plant trait distributions or plant community structure. We outline how this framework can be applied to studies that compare floras within cities or among cities to better understand the various floristic responses to urbanization.


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