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dc.contributor.authorCheeseman, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-13T09:20:47Z
dc.date.available2018-09-13T09:20:47Z
dc.date.issued2018-07
dc.identifier.citationCheeseman, M. (2018) 'Bruno Schulz' in Lehóczky, Á. & Welsch, J. T. (eds.) Wretched strangers: transnational poetries edited by Ágnes Lehóczky and JT Welsch, Norwich: Boiler House Press.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781911343387
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622965
dc.description.abstractA creative non-fiction memoir of a lost friend who introduced me to Bruno Schulz. This is a chapter in a pro-EU anthology which was published on the anniversary of Brexit in response to surges of violent British nationalism and political paranoia. Edited by JT Welsch and Ágnes Lehóczky the anthology marks the vital contribution of non-UK-born writers to the UK's poetry culture. Wretched Strangers brings together innovative writing from around the globe, celebrating the irreducible diversity such work brings to ‘British’ poetry. While documenting the challenges faced by writers from elsewhere, these pieces offer hopeful re-conceptions of ‘shared foreignness’ as Lila Matsumoto describes it, and the ‘peculiar state of exiled human,’ in Fawzi Karim’s words.
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBoiler House Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.boilerhouse.press/wretched-strangersen
dc.subjectCreative writingen
dc.subjectPoetryen
dc.subjectBrexiten
dc.subjectMigrationen
dc.subjectRefugeesen
dc.titleBruno Schulz.en
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
html.description.abstractA creative non-fiction memoir of a lost friend who introduced me to Bruno Schulz. This is a chapter in a pro-EU anthology which was published on the anniversary of Brexit in response to surges of violent British nationalism and political paranoia. Edited by JT Welsch and Ágnes Lehóczky the anthology marks the vital contribution of non-UK-born writers to the UK's poetry culture. Wretched Strangers brings together innovative writing from around the globe, celebrating the irreducible diversity such work brings to ‘British’ poetry. While documenting the challenges faced by writers from elsewhere, these pieces offer hopeful re-conceptions of ‘shared foreignness’ as Lila Matsumoto describes it, and the ‘peculiar state of exiled human,’ in Fawzi Karim’s words.


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